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Thank you to the 1,000 leaders who’ve generously done the 7 questions!

I hope reading

7 Questions with Jonathan Westall

helps you in your leadership.

 

Cheers,

Jonno White

7 Questions with Jonathan Westall

Name: Jonathan Westall

Current title: Vice President, Ancillary Services

Current organisation: Martin Luther King Jr. Community Hospital

Jonathan Westall, FACHE is currently the Vice President of Ancillary Services at MLK Jr. Community Hospital in South Los Angeles. He previously held multiple positions at Huntington Hospital in Pasadena including Manager of Security, Director of Security, and finally Director of Support Services. Prior to working in the acute care setting, Jonathan oversaw Security, Emergency Response, and Parking operations for Sony PlayStation and its subsidiary groups across the United States. Jonathan spent 8 years working in various Federal, State, and local correctional facilities where he oversaw security operations for an incarcerated population.

Jonathan holds a Bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice w/ a minor in Sociology from Upper Iowa University and a Master’s degree in Law Enforcement Administration from Grand Canyon University. He is also a graduate of ACHE’s Senior Executive Program. He is a volunteer leader with IAHSS and was the LA/OC Chapter Chair for 3 years, and now The International Board’s VP/Secretary. He also chaired The Hospital Association of Southern California’s Safety and Security Committee from 2018 to 2020 and remains an active member. He is currently The Vice-Chair of Sponsorship with HCE.

7 Questions with Jonathan Westall

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1. What have you found most challenging as a CEO or executive of a large enterprise?

I have been most challenged by breaking cultural norms within the professional world. So many processes are engrained, that need updating or modernizing, yet so many organizations stick to the way things have always been done. Innovation isn’t implemented.

2. How did you become a CEO or executive of a large enterprise? Can you please briefly tell the story?

I just never said no to ongoing responsibility. Personal education and certifications. Constantly proving I was up to the task and willing to put in the work to get the job done, no matter how large or how small. Not worried about short term gain, but long term success. And just generally be nice to people.

3. How do you structure your work days from waking up to going to sleep?

I try to wake up and adjust to the day with a few news articles or current events so I’m versed on what’s going on and then about a gallon of black ice coffee!! I then get to work before most to have all my emails from the overnight answers or structured in a way that folks know I received them and am working on it. Then spend the day tackling what arises and fitting in the long term stuff between the daily hot button issues. If it can be fixed and handled immediately I do it. Do not wait, no use in pushing something off that can be knocked out today. Finally I make sure I never go to bed with unread emails or texts. It will just bog down your next day. It takes 2 seconds to reply that you’re working on it and will follow up.

4. What's the most recent significant leadership lesson you've learned?

Take lessons from everyone… from the entry level employee to the most seasoned executive. They all teach you how to interact and communicate with people across all spectrums. Change how you speak depending on your audience, if you don’t you alienate people.

5. What's one book that has had a profound impact on your leadership so far? Can you please briefly tell the story of how that book impacted your leadership?

Extreme Ownership. It’s right in the title, if you’re the boss it’s on you. No other words or excuses it’s what it is, you have to own everything.

6. How do you build leadership capacity in a large enterprise?

Social Capital. Be approachable and easy to work with even if you know nothing about the task. Know when to follow and when to lead. Move between each role and you earned more implied authority then you actually have.