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750 Best How To Win Friends And Influence People Quotes

1. “Always shoot for the moon. Even if you don’t hit the bulls-eye, you’ll at least get 80 percent.”


2. “Once you take the time to consider the other person's perspective, you will become sympathetic to his feel ins and ideas. You will be able to authentically and honestly say, "I don't blame you for feeling as you do. If I were in your position, I would feel just as you do.”


3. “Lincoln once began a letter saying: “Everybody likes a compliment.” William James said: “The deepest principle in human nature is the craving to be appreciated.”


4. Happiness doesn’t depend on any external conditions, it is governed by our mental attitude.


5. “As Lord Chesterfield said to his son: Be wiser than other people if you can; but do not tell them so.”


6. “edition all reading matter of all kinds on one average day,”


7. “Always make the other person feel important.”


8. “It is the individual who is not interested in his fellow men who has the greatest difficulties in life and provides the greatest injury to others.”


9. “Compared to what we ought to be,” said the famous Professor William James of Harvard, “compared to what we ought to be, we are only half awake. We are making use of only a small part of our physical and mental resources. Stating the thing broadly, the human individual thus lives far within his limits. He possesses powers of various sorts which he habitually fails to use.”


10. A barber lathers a man before he shaves him.


11. “To be interesting, be interested.”


12. “King George V had a set of six maxims displayed on the walls of his study at Buckingham Palace. One of these maxims said: ‘Teach me neither to proffer nor receive cheap praise.”


13. “Alfred Adler, the famous Viennese psychologist, wrote a book entitled What Life Should Mean to You. In that book he says: ‘It is the individual who is not interested in his fellow men who has the greatest difficulties in life and provides the greatest injury to others. It is from among such individuals that all human failures spring.’ You”


14. “The fact is that all people you meet have a high regard for themselves and like to be fine and unselfish in their own estimation.”


15. “The ability to remember names is almost as important in business and social contacts as it is in politics.” – Dale Carnegie


16. “If there is any one secret of success, it lies in the ability to get the other person’s point of view and see things from that person’s angle as well as from your own.”


17. “from Madeline Rosedale, a depositor, was published:* ”


18. It doesn’t matter what you are, what you have, who you are, and what things you do that make you happy, but what you think about the situation.


19. “Of course flattery seldom works with discerning people. It is shallow, selfish and insincere. It ought to fail and it usually does. True, some people are so hungry, so thirsty, for appreciation that they will swallow anything, just as a starving man will eat grass and fishworms.”


20. “Try honestly to see things from the other person’s point of view.”


21. “TECHNIQUES IN HANDLING PEOPLE Principle 1—Don’t criticize, condemn or complain. Principle 2—Give honest and sincere appreciation. Principle 3—Arouse in the other person an eager want.”


22. “When two partners always agree, one of them is not necessary.”


23. “B.F. Skinner, the world-famous psychologist, proved through his experiments that an animal rewarded for good behaviour will learn much more rapidly and retain what it learns far more effectively than an animal punished for bad behaviour. Later studies have shown that the same applies to humans. By criticising, we do not make lasting changes and often incur resentment. Hans”


24. “Don't be afraid of enemies who attack you. Be afraid of the friends who flatter you.”


25. “We are gods in the chrysalis.”


26. “Your smile is a messenger of your good will. Your smile brightens the lives of all who see it” – Dale Carnegie


27. “Over three hundred years ago Galileo said: You cannot teach a man anything; you can only help him to find it within himself.”


28. Every man I meet is my superior in some way, in that, I learn of him.


29. “But what do average people do? The exact opposite. If they don’t like a thing, they bawl out their subordinates; if they do like it, they say nothing.”


30. “Even god doesn’t propose to judge a man till his last days, why should you and I?”


31. “Actions speak louder than words, and a smile says, ‘I like you. You make me happy. I am glad to see you.”


32. Everybody likes a compliment.


33. “Now, if we stop thinking about ourselves for a while and begin to think of the other person’s good points, we won’t have to resort to flattery so cheap and false that it can be spotted almost before it is out of the mouth.”


34. “Let’s realize that the person we are going to correct and condemn will probably justify himself or herself, and condemn us in return;”


35. Everybody likes to be praised, but when praise is specific, it comes across as sincere.


36. “Bernard Shaw once remarked: ‘If you teach a man anything, he will never learn.”


37. “I have enough trouble overcoming my own limitations without fretting over the fact that God has not seen fit to distribute evenly the gift of intelligence.”


38. “Benjamin Franklin, tactless in his youth, became so diplomatic, so adroit at handling people, that he was made American Ambassador to France. The secret of his success? “I will speak ill of no man,” he said, “ … and speak all the good I know of everybody.”


39. “REGLA 1 La única forma de salir ganando de una discusión es evitándola.”


40. “All men have fears, but the brave put down their fears and go forward, sometimes to death, but always to victory”


41. “When a study was made a few years ago on runaway wives, what do you think was discovered to be the main reason wives ran away? It was “lack of appreciation.”


42. “A person’s toothache means more to that person than a famine in China which kills a million people. A boil on one’s neck interests one more than forty earthquakes in Africa. Think of that the next time you start a conversation.”


43. “I consider my ability to arouse enthusiasm among my people,” said Schwab, “the greatest asset I possess, and the way to develop the best that is in a person is by appreciation and encouragement. “There is nothing else that so kills the ambitions of a person as criticisms from superiors. I never criticize anyone. I believe in giving a person incentive to work. So I am anxious to praise but loath to find fault.”


44. “Instead of condemning people, let’s try to understand them. Let’s try to figure out why they do what they do. That’s a lot more profitable and intriguing than criticism; and it breeds sympathy, tolerance and kindness. “To know all is to forgive all.” As Dr. Johnson said: “God himself, sir, does not propose to judge man until the end of his days.” Why should you and I?”


45. Encourage them to express their ideas fully.


46. Abilities wither under criticism; they blossom under encouragement.


47. “Personally I am very fond of strawberries and cream, but I have found that for some strange reason, fish prefer worms. So when I went fishing, I didn’t think about what I wanted. I thought about what they wanted. I didn’t bait the hook with strawberries and cream. Rather, I dangled a worm or a grasshopper in front of the fish and said: “Wouldn’t you like to have that?” Why not use the same common sense when fishing for people?”


48. “The reason why rivers and seas receive the homage of a hundred mountain streams is that they keep below them. Thus they are able to reign over all the mountain streams. So the sage, wishing to be above men, putteth himself below them; wishing to be before them, he putteth himself behind them. Thus, though his place be above men, they do not feel his weight; though his place be before them, they do not count it an injury.”


49. “Se há algum segredo de sucesso, ele consiste na habilidade de apreender o ponto de vista da outra pessoa e ver as coisas tão bem pelo ângulo dela como pelo seu”. Essa”


50. “It took me years and cost me countless thousands of dollars in lost business before I finally learned that it doesn’t pay to argue, that it is much more profitable and much more interesting to look at things from the other person’s viewpoint and try to get that person saying ‘yes, yes’.” – Dale Carnegie


51. “The next time we are tempted to admonish somebody, let’s pull a five-dollar bill out of our pocket, look at Lincoln’s picture on the bill, and ask, “How would Lincoln handle this problem if he had it?”


52. “called Forest Park—and it was a forest, probably not much different in appearance from what it was when Columbus discovered America. I frequently walked in this park with Rex, my little Boston bulldog. He was a friendly, harmless little hound; and since we rarely”


53. “Most of the important things in the world have been accomplished by people who have kept on trying when there seemed to be no hope at all.”


54. You can make more friends in two months by becoming interested in other people that you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you.


55. “You can’t win an argument. You can’t because if you lose it, you lose it; and if you win it, you lose it. Why? Well, suppose you triumph over the other man and shoot his argument full of holes and prove that he is non compos mentis. Then what? You will feel fine. But what about him? You have made him feel inferior. You have hurt his pride. He will resent your triumph.”


56. “Become genuinely interested in other people.”


57. “Success is getting what you want. Happiness is wanting what you get.”


58. “There is only one way under high heaven to get anybody to do anything. Did you ever stop to think of that? Yes, just one way. And that is by making the other person want to do it. Remember,”


59. “Si hay un secreto del éxito, reside en la capacidad para apreciar el punto de vista del prójimo y ver las cosas desde ese punto de vista así como”


60. “Dr. Dewey said that the deepest urge in human nature is “the desire to be important.” Remember that phrase: “the desire to be important.” It is significant. You are going to hear a lot about it in this book.”


61. “A man convinced against his will


62. Don’t kick the beehive if you want to take honey home.


63. Remember, today is the tomorrow you worried about yesterday.


64. “Always make the other person feel important. John Dewey, as we have already noted, said that the desire to be important is the deepest urge in human nature; and William James said: “The”


65. “Any fool can try to defend his or her mistakes—and most fools do—but it raises one above the herd and gives one a feeling of nobility and exultation to admit one’s mistakes.”


66. “I am grateful because these people come to see me. They make it possible for me to make my living in a very agreeable way. I’m going to give them the very best I possibly can.”


67. “Every man I meet is my superior in some way. In that, I learn of him.” – Dale Carnegie


68. “Develop success from failure. Discouragement and failure are two of the surest stepping stones to success.”


69. “Cualquier tonto puede criticar, censurar y quejarse, y casi todos los tontos lo hacen. Pero se necesita carácter y dominio de sí mismo para ser comprensivo y capaz de perdonar.”


70. If you are going to prove anything, don’t let anybody know it.


71. “your room alone. Just a few minutes ago, as I sat reading my paper in the library, a stifling wave of remorse swept over me. Guiltily I came to your bedside. There are the things I was thinking, son: I had been cross to you. I scolded you as you were dressing for school because you gave your face merely a dab with a towel. I took you to task for not cleaning your shoes. I called out angrily when you threw some of your things on the floor.”


72. “Remember that a person’s name is to that person the sweetest and most important sound in any language.”


73. “I have asked thousands of business people to smile at someone every hour of the day for a week and then come to class and talk about the results.”


74. Every successful person loves the game. The chance to prove his worth, to excel, to win.


75. “That is what every successful person loves: the game. The chance for self-expression. The chance to prove his or her worth, to excel, to win. That is what makes footraces and hog-calling and pie-eating contests. The desire to excel. The desire for a feeling of importance. PRINCIPLE”


76. “Primero, despertar en la otra persona un franco deseo. Quien puede hacerlo tiene al mundo entero consigo. Quien no puede, marcha solo por el camino.”


77. “Resentment caused by a brash order may last a long time—even if the order was given to correct an obviously bad situation.”


78. “Exclusive attention to the person who is speaking to you is very important. Nothing else is so flattering as that.”


79. “Always avoid the acute angle.”


80. The average person is more interested in her own name than in all the other names on earth put together.


81. “Remember that other people may be totally wrong. But they don’t think so. Don’t condemn them. Any fool can do that. Try to understand them. Only wise, tolerant, exceptional people even try to do that.”


82. “Criticism is futile because it puts a person on the defensive and usually makes him strive to justify himself. Criticism is dangerous, because it wounds a person’s precious pride, hurts his sense of importance, and arouses resentment.”


83. “If You Want to Gather Honey, Don't Kick Over the Beehive”


84. “If you want to know how to make people shun you and laugh at you behind your back and even despise you, here is the recipe: Never listen to anyone for long. Talk incessantly about yourself. If you have an idea while the other person is talking, don’t wait for him or her to finish: bust right in and interrupt in the middle of a sentence.”


85. “I had done my best, and that my lack of experience, not my lack of ability, was the reason for the failure.”


86. “By fighting you never get enough, but by yielding you get more than you expected.” – Dale Carnegie


87. “If you want to gather honey, don't kick over the beehive.”


88. “Criticism is futile because it puts a person on the defensive and usually makes them strive to justify themselves.”


89. Instead of blaming people, it is better to understand them.


90. “Don’t criticise them; they are just what we would be under similar circumstances.” Yet”


91. “Electrical Manufacturers Association. Isn’t that so?’ ‘He agreed it was. I had gotten my first “yes.” ‘“The Electrical Manufacturers Association regulations say that a properly designed motor may have a temperature of 72 degrees Fahrenheit above room temperature. Is that correct?”


92. “A great man shows his greatness,” said Carlyle, “by the way he treats little men.” (How to Win Friends and Influence People Quotes)


93. “So if you aspire to be a good conversationalist, be an attentive listener. To be interesting, be interested. Ask questions that other persons will enjoy answering. Encourage them to talk about themselves and their accomplishments. Remember”


94. “So if you aspire to be a good conversationalist, be an attentive listener. To be interesting, be interested. Ask questions that other persons will enjoy answering. Encourage them to talk about themselves and their accomplishments.”


95. “Any fool can criticize, complain, and condemn—and most fools do. But it takes character and self-control to be understanding and forgiving.”


96. “bait the hook to suit the fish.”


97. “A great man shows his greatness,” said Carlyle, “by the way he treats little men.” B”


98. “General Obregon’s philosophy: “Don’t be afraid of enemies who attack you. Be afraid of the friends who flatter you.”


99. “You may be right, dead right, as you speed along in your argument; but as far as changing another’s mind is concerned, you will probably be just as futile as if you were wrong.”


100. “most of our so-called reasoning consists in finding arguments for going on believing as we already do.”


101. “To repeat Professor Overstreet’s wise advice: First, arouse in the other person an eager want. He who can do this has the whole world with him. He who cannot walks a lonely way.”


102. “The Secret of Success Is To Triple Your Rate of Failure.”


103. “In other words, don’t argue with your customer or your spouse or your adversary. Don’t tell them they are wrong, don’t get them stirred up. Use a little diplomacy.”


104. “And the pathetic part of it is that frequently those who have the least justification for a feeling of achievement bolster up their egos by a show of tumult and conceit which is truly nauseating. As Shakespeare put it: “ … man, proud man, / Drest in a little brief authority, / … Plays such fantastic tricks before high heaven / As make the angels weep.”


105. The secret of success is to speak all the good things about a person.


106. “Criticism is futile because it puts a person on the defensive and usually makes him strive to justify himself.”


107. “We often take our spouses so much for granted that we never let them know we appreciate them.”


108. “It isn’t what you have or who you are or where you are or what you are doing that makes you happy or unhappy. It is what you think about it. For example, two people may be in the same place, doing the same thing; both may have about an equal amount of money and prestige—and yet one may be miserable and the other happy. Why? Because of a different mental attitude.”


109. Criticism is dangerous because it wounds a person’s pride, hurts his sense of importance, and arouses resentment.


110. “If you want to help others to improve, remember… Principle 8 Use encouragement. Make the fault seem easy to correct.”


111. If you argue and rankle and contradict, you may achieve a victory sometimes; but it will be an empty victory because you will never get your opponent’s goodwill.


112. “When dealing with people, let us remember we are not dealing with creatures of logic. We are dealing with creatures of emotion, creatures bristling with prejudices and motivated by pride and vanity. B”


113. “The way to get things done,” says Schwab, “is to stimulate competition. I do not mean in a sordid, money-getting way, but in the desire to excel.”


114. “Sympathy the human species universally craves.”


115. “And that was the killer who said: ‘Under my coat is a weary heart, but a kind one—one that would do nobody any harm.”


116. “Actions speaker louder than words, and a smile says, ‘I like you. You make me happy. I am glad to see you.'” – Dale Carnegie


117. “Emerson said: “Every man I meet is my superior in some way. In that, I learn of him.”


118. “Ask questions instead of giving direct orders.”


119. “PRINCIPLE 1 The only way to get the best of an argument is to avoid it. PRINCIPLE 2 Show respect for the other person’s opinions. Never say, “You’re wrong.” PRINCIPLE 3 If you are wrong, admit it quickly and emphatically. PRINCIPLE 4 Begin in a friendly way. PRINCIPLE 5 Get the other person saying “yes, yes” immediately. PRINCIPLE 6 Let the other person do a great deal of the talking. PRINCIPLE 7 Let the other person feel that the idea”


120. “the only way on earth to influence other people is to talk about what they want and show them how to get it.”


121. “Bernard Shaw once remarked: “If you teach a man anything, he will never learn.” Shaw was right. Learning is an active process. We learn by doing. So, if you desire to master the principles you are studying in this book, do something about them. Apply these rules at every opportunity. If you don’t you will forget them quickly. Only knowledge that is used sticks in your mind.”


122. “It isn’t what you have or who you are or where you are or what you are doing that makes you happy or unhappy. It is what you think about it. For”


123. “Napoleon was criticized for giving “toys” to war-hardened veterans, and Napoleon replied, “Men are ruled by toys.”


124. Arouse in the other person an eager want. He who can do this has the whole world with him.


125. Flaming enthusiasm backed up by horse sense and persistence is the quality that most frequently makes for success.


126. “the great aim of education,’ said Herbert Spencer, ‘is not knowledge but action.”


127. “Personally I am very fond of strawberries and cream, but I have found that for some strange reason, fish prefer worms. So when I went fishing, I didn’t think about what I wanted. I thought about what they wanted. I didn't bait the hook with strawberries and cream. Rather, I dangled a worm or grasshopper in front of the fish and said: "Wouldn't you like to have that?"


128. “John D. Rockefeller said, “the ability to deal with people is as purchasable a commodity as sugar or coffee. And I will pay more for that ability than for any other under the sun.”


129. “En comparación con lo que deberíamos ser -decía el famoso profesor William James, de la Universidad de Harvard-, sólo estamos despiertos a medias. Sólo empleamos una pequeña parte de nuestros recursos físicos y mentales. En términos generales, el individuo vive así muy dentro de sus límites Posee cualidades de diversas especies que habitualmente no usa.”


130. “To be interesting, be interested. Ask questions that other persons will enjoy answering. Encourage them to talk about themselves and their accomplishments.”


131. The easy way to make friends is by bringing interest in them instead of waiting for their interest in you.


132. “way to get things done,” says Schwab, “is to stimulate competition.”


133. “Looking at the other person’s point of view and arousing in him an eager want for something is not to be construed as manipulating that person so that he will do something that is only for your benefit and his detriment. Each party should gain from the negotiation.”


134. A barber is often seen lathering a man before shaving him.


135. “That’s why encouragement is a much more effective teaching device than punishment.”


136. “You never read a book on psychology, Tippy. You didn’t need to. You knew by some divine instinct that you can make more friends in two months by becoming genuinely interested in other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you. Let me repeat that. You can make more friends in two months by becoming interested in other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you.”


137. “Action springs out of what we fundamentally desire ... and the best piece of advice which can be given to would-be persuaders, whether in business, in the home, in the school, in politics, is: First, arouse in the other person an eager want. He who can do this has the whole world with him. He who cannot walks a lonely way”


138. Ask yourself: What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.


139. “Judge not, that ye be not judged.”


140. “IN A NUTSHELL FUNDAMENTAL TECHNIQUES IN HANDLING PEOPLE PRINCIPLE 1 Don’t criticize, condemn or complain. PRINCIPLE 2 Give honest and sincere appreciation. PRINCIPLE 3 Arouse in the other person an eager want.”


141. “SuperSummary guides are very thorough, accurate, and easy to understand and navigate. The information is chapter specific and so it's easy to target certain things.”


142. “All men have fears, but the brave put down their fears and go forward.” – Dale Carnegie


143. “Ver las cosas según el punto de vista ajeno puede facilitarlo todo cuando los problemas personales se vuelven abrumadores.”


144. “I consider my ability to arouse enthusiasm among my people,” said Schwab, “the greatest asset I possess, and the way to develop the best that is in a person is by appreciation and encouragement.”


145. “Even if we are right and the other person is definitely wrong, we only destroy ego by causing someone to lose face. The legendary French aviation pioneer and author Antoine de Saint-Exupéry wrote: “I have no right to say or do anything that diminishes a man in his own eyes. What matters is not what I think of him, but what he thinks of himself. Hurting a man in his dignity is a crime.”


146. “A great man shows his greatness,” said Carlyle, “by the way he treats little men.” Bob”


147. “The secret of his success? “I will speak ill of no man,” he said, “. . and speak all the good I know of everybody.”


148. “Nobody in the heavens above or on the earth beneath or in the waters under the earth will ever object to your saying: ‘I may be wrong. Let’s examine the facts.”


149. “God has not seen fit to distribute evenly the gift of intelligence.”


150. “hearty in your approbation and lavish in your praise,”


151. “please feel free to work an extra half hour from time to time if you feel you need to do those “once-in-a-while” things like polishing the cup holders and the like. I, of course, will pay you for the extra time. “The next day, when I walked into my office,” Dr. Fitzhugh reported, “my desk had been polished to a mirror-like finish, as had my chair, which I nearly slid out of.”


152. “If you argue and rankle and contradict, you may achieve a victory sometimes; but it will be an empty victory because you will never get your opponent’s good will.”


153. “Every successful person loves the game. The chance to prove his worth, to excel, to win.” – Dale Carnegie


154. “if you aspire to be a good conversationalist, be an attentive listener. To be interesting, be interested. Ask questions that other persons will enjoy answering. Encourage them to talk about themselves and their accomplishments.”


155. “Hay una divinidad que forja nuestros fines, por mucho que queramos alterarlos".”


156. “There you are; human nature in action, wrongdoers, blaming everybody but themselves.”


157. “When dealing with people, remember you are not dealing with creatures of logic, but with creatures bristling with prejudice and motivated by pride and vanity.”


158. “It is the individual who is not interested in his fellow men who has the greatest difficulties in life and provides the greatest injury to others. It is from among such individuals that all human failures spring.”


159. Exclusive attention to the person who is speaking to you is very important. Nothing else is so flattering as that.


160. “I shall pass this way but once; any good, therefore, that I can do or any kindness that I can show to any human being, let me do it now. Let me not defer nor neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again.”


161. “If you can be sure of being right only 55 percent of the time, you can go down to Wall Street and make a million dollars a day. If you can’t be sure of being right even 55 percent of the time, why should you tell other people they are wrong?”


162. “mistakes did I make that time?’ “‘What did I do that was right—and in what way could I have improved my performance?’ “‘What lessons can I learn from that experience?”


163. “Let’s realize that criticisms are like homing pigeons. They always return home. Let’s realize that the person we are going to correct and condemn will probably justify himself or herself, and condemn us in return;”


164. Always try to make good memories and leave good impressions on a trip because you will surprise in the future when these small things lead to a beautiful life ahead.


165. “Thus they are able to reign over all the mountain streams. So the sage, wishing to be above men, putteth himself below them; wishing to be before them, he putteth himself behind them. Thus, though his place be above men, they do not feel his weight; though his place be before them, they do not count it an injury.”


166. “is his or hers. PRINCIPLE 8 Try honestly to see things from the other person’s point of view. PRINCIPLE 9 Be sympathetic with the other person’s ideas and desires. PRINCIPLE 10 Appeal to the nobler motives. PRINCIPLE 11 Dramatize your ideas. PRINCIPLE 12 Throw down a challenge.”


167. “Encourage others to talk about themselves”.


168. Calling attention to one’s mistakes indirectly works wonders with sensitive people who may resent bitterly any direct criticism.


169. “Let me repeat that. You can make more friends in two months by becoming interested in other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you.”


170. “The successful man will profit from his mistakes and try again in a different way.”


171. “You can measure the size of a person by what makes him or her angry.”


172. If someone is hungry for emotional importance, they will go insane to achieve it.


173. “Except How to win friends and influence people, I am looking for a kind of book like that”


174. “So the rare individual who unselfishly tries to serve others has an enormous advantage.”


175. “Hay que evitar siempre el ángulo agudo.”


176. “wrongdoers, blaming everybody but themselves. We”


177. “If you want to be enthusiastic, act enthusiastic.”


178. Happiness can be achieved by controlling your thoughts, depending on the inner conditions.


179. Actions are always the reflections of what we desire. Our actions should be positive, so as your desires.


180. “The only way to influence people is to talk in terms of what the other person wants” – Dale Carnegie


181. The rare individual who unselfishly tries to serve others has an enormous advantage.


182. “Success is getting what you want..


183. “It isn’t what you have or who you are or where you are or what you are doing that makes you happy or unhappy. It is what you think about it.”


184. “Harry A. Overstreet in his illuminating book Influencing Human Behavior said: “Action springs out of what we fundamentally desire … and the best piece of advice which can be given to would-be persuaders, whether in business, in the home, in the school, in politics, is: First, arouse in the other person an eager want. He who can do this has the whole world with him. He who cannot walks a lonely way.”


185. “Buddha said: ‘Hatred is never ended by hatred but by love,’ and a misunderstanding is never ended by an argument but by tact, diplomacy, conciliation and a sympathetic desire to see the other person’s viewpoint.”


186. “So figure it out for yourself. Which would you rather have, an academic, theatrical victory or a person’s good will? You can seldom have both. The Boston Transcript once printed this bit of significant doggerel: Here lies the body of William Jay, Who died maintaining his right of way— He was right, dead right, as he sped along, But he’s just as dead as if he were wrong.”


187. “Peruse this bit of sage advice from the essayist and publisher Elbert Hubbard....


188. “Whenever you go out-of-doors, draw the chin in, carry the crown of the head high, and fill the lungs to the utmost; drink in the sunshine; greet your friends with a smile, and put soul into every handclasp.”


189. I can fulfil your work, but it depends on what you want.


190. “Actions speak louder than words, and a smile says, ‘I like you. You make me happy. I am glad to see you.’ That is why dogs make such a hit. They are so glad to see us that they almost jump out of their skins. So, naturally, we are glad to see them.”


191. “the expression one wears on one’s face is far more important than the clothes one wears on one’s back.”


192. To be interesting, be interested.


193. “When we are not engaged in thinking about some definite problem, we usually spend about 95 percent of our time thinking about ourselves.”


194. “It is an interesting paradox that the more you surrender the credit for something you've done, the more memorable you become, and the more you actually end up receiving credit.”


195. “No hablaré mal hombre alguno y de todos diré todo lo bueno que sepa”


196. “Daca ceea ce doriti sa faceti este corect si credeti in el, porniti spre implinire! Puneti visele inainte, si nu conteaza ce spune gura lumii daca va confruntati cu infrangerea temporara, caci poate ca lumea nu stie ca orice esec aduce cu el germenele unui eventual succes.”


197. “Adler’s statement is so rich with meaning that I am going to repeat it in italics: It is the individual who is not interested in his fellow men who has the greatest difficulties in life and provides the greatest injury to others. It is from among such individuals that all human failures spring.”


198. “If there is any one secret of success,” said Henry Ford, “it lies in the ability to get the other person’s point of view and see things from that person’s angle as well as from your own.”


199. “I will speak ill of no man,” he said, “ … and speak all the good I know of everybody.”


200. You shouldn’t be afraid of the enemies, rather than be afraid of the friends who might backstab you.


201. “Teach me neither to proffer nor receive cheap praise.” That”


202. One reason why birds and horses are not unhappy is because they are not trying to impress other birds and horses.


203. “It is an old and true maxim that “a drop of honey catches more flies than a gallon of gall.” So with men, if you would win a man to you cause, first convince him that you are his sincere friend. Therein is a drop of honey that catches his heart; which, say what you will, is the great high road to his reason.”


204. “Once I did bad and that I heard ever. Twice I did good, but that I heard never.”


205. “Any fool can criticize, condemn, and complain – and most fools do.” – Dale Carnegie


206. “Let’s realize that the person we are going to correct and condemn will probably justify himself or herself, and condemn us in return; or, like the gentle Taft, will say: “I don’t see how I could have done any differently from what I have.” On”


207. “Cooperativeness in conversation is achieved when you show that you consider the other person’s ideas and feelings as important as your own.”


208. “Let's realise that criticisms are like homing pigeons. They always return home. Let's realise that the person we are going to correct and condemn will probably justify himself o herself, and condemn us in return.”


209. “I have aced all my essays and writing assignments since using SuperSummary. The guide themes, chapter outlines and character summaries are more detailed than other sites.”


210. “It is the way we react to circumstances that determine our feelings.”


211. “Si hay un secreto del éxito —dijo Henry Ford— reside en la capacidad para apreciar el punto de vista del prójimo y ver las cosas desde ese punto de vista así como del propio.”


212. “Abilities wither under criticism; they blossom under encouragement. To become a more effective leader of people, apply… Principle 6 Praise the slightest improvement and praise every improvement. Be “hearty in your approbation and lavish in your praise.”


213. So the only way to influence other people is to talk about what they want and show them how to get it.


214. You should be interested in someone so that they will be interested in you.


215. “When dealing with people, let us remember we are not dealing with creatures of logic. We are dealing with creatures of emotion, creatures bristling with prejudices and motivated by pride and vanity. Bitter”


216. People will listen to you for many hours if you talk about them.


217. As much as we thirst for approval, we dread condemnation.


218. “Don’t be afraid of enemies who attack you. Be afraid of the friends who flatter you.” No!”


219. “Publilius Syrus, remarked: ‘We are interested in others when they are interested in us.”


220. “Men must be taught as if you taught them not And things unknown proposed as things forgot.”


221. “Here lies the body of William Jay, Who died maintaining his right of way— He was right, dead right, as he sped along, But he’s just as dead as if he were wrong.”


222. “And when Mrs. Lincoln and others spoke harshly of the southern people, Lincoln replied: “Don’t criticize them; they are just what we would be under”


223. “Principle 1 Become genuinely interested in other people.”


224. “If you are satisfied with the results you are now getting, why change? If you are not satisfied, why not experiment?”


225. “By fighting you never get enough, but by yielding you get more than you expected.”


226. “Over three hundred years ago Galileo said: You cannot teach a man anything; you can only help him to find it within himself.”


227. “People who smile,” he said, “tend to manage, teach and sell more effectively, and to raise happier children. There’s far more information in a smile than a frown. That’s why encouragement is a much more effective teaching device than punishment.” The”


228. “There you are; human nature in action, wrongdoers, blaming everybody but themselves. We are all like that.”


229. “Buda dijo: "El odio nunca es vencido por el odio sino por el amor", y un malentendido no termina nunca gracias una discusión sino gracias al tacto, la diplomacia, la conciliación, y un sincero deseo de apreciar el punto de vista de los demás.”


230. “I shall pass this way but once; any good, therefore, that I can do or any kindness that I can show to any human being, let me do it now. Let me not defer nor neglect it, for I shall not”


231. “the great aim of education," said Herbert Spencer, "is not knowledge but action.”


232. “I shall pass this way but once; any good, therefore, that I can do or any kindness that I can show to any human being, let me do it now. Let me not defer nor neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again. Emerson”


233. “Remember that the people you are talking to are a hundred times more interested in themselves and their wants and problems than they are in you and your problems.”


234. “Why talk about what we want? That is childish. Absurd. Of course, you are interested in what you want. You are eternally interested in it. But no one else is. The rest of us are just like you: we are interested in what we want.”


235. “What has habit been doing to me?”


236. “Pay less attention to what men say. Just watch what they do.” – Dale Carnegie


237. “Remember what Lincoln said: ‘A drop of honey catches more flies than a gallon of gall.”


238. “Let’s realize that criticisms are like homing pigeons. They always return home. Let’s realize that the person we are going to correct and condemn will probably justify himself or herself, and condemn us in return; or,”


239. “Be concerned with your character than with your reputation, for your character is what you are, while your reputation is merely what others think you are.”


240. “Oh, no, no! I am not going to wet this bed.” The boy kept his promise, for his pride was involved. That was his bed. He and he alone had bought it. And he was wearing pajamas now like a little man. He wanted to act like a man. And he did.”


241. “Wouldn’t you like to have a magic phrase that would stop arguments, eliminate ill feeling, create good will, and make the other person listen attentively? Yes? All right. Here it is: “I don’t blame you one iota for feeling as you do. If I were you I would undoubtedly feel just as you do.”


242. “Don’t criticize, condemn or complain.”


243. “people you are talking to are a hundred times more interested in themselves and their wants and problems than they are in you and your problems.”


244. It is always easier to listen to unpleasant things after we have heard some praise for our good points.


245. “We nourish the bodies of our children and friends and employees, but how seldom do we nourish their self-esteem? We provide them with roast beef and potatoes to build energy, but we neglect to give them kind words of appreciation that would sing in their memories for years like the music of the morning stars.”


246. “success in dealing with people depends on a sympathetic grasp of the other person’s viewpoint.”


247. “We ride roughshod over the feelings of others, getting our own way, finding fault, issuing threats, criticising a child or an employee in front of others, without even considering the hurt to the other person’s pride. Whereas a few minutes’ thought, a considerate word or two, a genuine understanding of the other person’s attitude, would go so far toward alleviating the sting!”


248. Take a chance! All life is a chance. The man who goes furthest is generally the one who is willing to do and dare.


249. “we all crave appreciation and recognition, and will do almost anything to get it. But nobody wants insincerity. Nobody wants flattery. Let”


250. “The difference between appreciation and flattery? That is simply. One is sincere and the other insincere. One comes from the heart out; the other from the teeth out. One is unselfish; the other selfish. One is universally admired; the other universally condemned.”


251. “I consider my ability to arouse enthusiasm among my people,” said Schwab, “the greatest asset I possess, and the way to develop the best that is in a person is by appreciation and encouragement. “There is nothing else that so kills the ambitions of a person as criticisms from superiors.”


252. “A man without a smiling face must not open a shop.” Your”


253. “Anyone who takes the time to disagree with you is interested in the same things you are. Think of them as people who really want to help you and you turn your opponents into friends.” – Dale Carnegie


254. “The only way on earth to influence the other fellow is to talk about what he wants and show him how to get it.”


255. “This man declared that during all that time he had never heard Owen D. Young give a direct order to anyone. He always gave suggestions, not orders. Owen D. Young never said, for example, “Do this or do that,” or “Don’t do this or don’t do that.” He would say, “You might consider this,” or “Do you think that would work?” Frequently he would say, after he had dictated a letter, “What do you think of this?”


256. “Did you ever stop to think that a dog is the only animal that doesn’t have to work for a living? A hen has to lay eggs, a cow has to give milk, and a canary has to sing. But a dog makes his living by giving you nothing but love.”


257. “She didn’t realize what everyone knows: namely, that the expression one wears on one’s face is far more important than the clothes one wears on one’s back.”


258. “Success is not something that must be deserved or earned. It is more an inherent right—an inherent responsibility. The only qualification for success is that you be you, that you utilize whatever combination of talent you possess to the fullest extent possible.”


259. “Remember that other people may be totally wrong. But they don’t think so.”


260. “Listening is just as important in one’s home life as in the world of business.”


261. “Any fool can criticize, condemn and complain - and most fools do. But it takes character and self-control to be under-standing and forgiving.”


262. “Action seems to follow feeling, but really action and feeling go together; and by regulating the action, which is under the more direct control of the will, we can indirectly regulate the feeling, which is not.”


263. “The resentment that criticism engenders can demoralize employees, family members and friends, and still not correct the situation that has been condemned.”


264. “Alfred Adler, the famous Viennese psychologist, wrote a book entitled What Life Should Mean to You. In that book he says: ‘It is the individual who is not interested in his fellow men who has the greatest difficulties in life and provides the greatest injury to others. It is from among such individuals that all human failures spring.”


265. “No one likes to feel that he or she is being sold something or told to do a thing. We much prefer to feel that we are buying of our own accord or acting on our own ideas. We like to be consulted about our wishes, our wants, our thoughts. Take the case of Eugene Wesson.”


266. “If you tell me how you get your feeling of importance, I’ll tell you what you are. That determines your character. That is the most significant thing about you.”


267. “Try to build bridges of understanding. Don’t build higher barriers of misunderstanding.”


268. “Remember, today is the tomorrow you worried about yesterday. ”


269. The difference between appreciation and flattery? That is simple. One is sincere and the other is insincere.


270. “If there is any one secret of success, it lies in the ability to get the other person’s point of view and see things from that person’s angle as well as from your own.’ That”


271. “You deserve very little credit for being what you are—and remember, the people who come to you irritated, bigoted, unreasoning, deserve very little discredit for being what they are. Feel sorry for the poor devils. Pity them. Sympathize with them. Say to yourself: “There, but for the grace of God, go I.” Three-fourths”


272. Criticisms are like homing pigeons. They always return home.


273. “This great contemporary psychologist has shown by experiments with animals and with humans that when criticism is minimized and praise emphasized, the good things people do will be reinforced and the poorer things will atrophy for lack of attention.”


274. “Any fool can criticize, condemn and complain—and most fools do. But it takes character and self-control to be understanding and forgiving.”


275. “Little phrases such as “I’m sorry to trouble you,” “Would you be so kind as to—?” “Won’t you please?” “Would you mind?” “Thank you”—little courtesies like these oil the cogs of the monotonous grind of everyday life—and, incidentally, they are the hallmark of good breeding.”


276. We are interested in others when they are interested in us.


277. We like to be consulted about our wishes, our wants, our thoughts.


278. Deal with people by thinking they are creatures of emotion, prejudices, and motivated by pride.


279. “gran objetivo de la educación -dijo Herbert Spencer no es el conocimiento, sino la acción".”


280. You can change the level of respect to change someone’s behavior.


281. “Good manners,” said Emerson, “are made up of petty sacrifices.”


282. “Don’t you have much more faith in ideas that you discover for yourself than in ideas that are handed to you on a silver platter? If so, isn’t it bad judgment to try to ram your opinions down the throats of other people? Isn’t it wiser to make suggestions—and let the other”


283. “John Wanamaker, founder of the stores that bear his name, once confessed: "I learned thirty years ago that it is foolish to scold. I have enough trouble overcoming my own limitations without fretting over the fact that God has not seen fit to distribute evenly the gift of intelligence.”


284. “Criticism is dangerous, because it wounds a person's precious pride, hurts his sense of importance, and arouses resentment.”


285. “Don’t be afraid of enemies who attack you. Be afraid of the friends who flatter you.” – Dale Carnegie


286. First, arouse in the other person an eager want. He who can do this has the whole world with him. He who cannot walks a lonely way.


287. “He declared he never stepped in front of the footlights without first saying to himself over and over: "I love my audience. I love my audience.”


288. “Why prove to a man he is wrong? Is that going to make him like you? Why not let him save his face? He didn’t ask for your opinion. He didn’t want it. Why argue with him? Always avoid the acute angle.”


289. “Names are the sweetest and most important sound in any language.”


290. “Keep busy. It’s the cheapest kind of medicine there is.”


291. The only way I can get you to do anything is by giving you what you want.


292. If you can’t sleep, then get up and do something instead of lying there and worrying. It’s the worry that gets you, not the loss of sleep.


293. “A man without a smiling face must not open a shop.’ Your”


294. “Saberlo todo es perdonarlo todo”


295. “Shakespeare said, “Assume a virtue, if you have it not.”


296. The main reason the wives run away is the lack of appreciation from their husbands. So you should always respect and appreciate others for their work.


297. “Everybody in the world is seeking happiness—and there is one sure way to find it. That is by controlling your thoughts. Happiness doesn't depend on outward conditions. It depends on inner conditions.”


298. “I have no right to say or do anything that diminishes a man in his own eyes. What matters is not what I think of him, but what he thinks of himself. Hurting a man in his dignity is a crime.”


299. “IN A NUTSHELL SIX WAYS TO MAKE PEOPLE LIKE YOU PRINCIPLE 1 Become genuinely interested in other people. PRINCIPLE 2 Smile. PRINCIPLE 3 Remember that a person’s name is to that person the sweetest and most important sound in any language. PRINCIPLE 4 Be a good listener. Encourage others to talk about themselves. PRINCIPLE 5 Talk in terms of the other person’s interests. PRINCIPLE 6 Make the other person feel important—and do it sincerely.”


300. “It was this desire for a feeling of importance that inspired Dickens to write his immortal novels. This desire inspired Sir Christoper Wren to design his symphonies in stone. This desire made Rockefeller amass millions that he never spent! And this same desire made the richest family in your town build a house far too large for its requirements. T”


301. “If out of reading this book you get just one thing—an increased tendency to think always in terms of other people’s point of view, and see things from their angle—if you get that one thing out of this book, it may easily prove to be one of the building blocks of your career. Looking”


302. “Tanto como anhelamos la aprobación, tememos la condena”


303. “But the very instant we break the law, we shall get into endless trouble. The law is this: Always make the other person feel important. John Dewey, as we have already noted, said that the desire to be important is the deepest urge in human nature; and William James said: “The deepest principle in human nature is the craving to be appreciated.”


304. “A man without a smiling face must not open a shop.”


305. Inaction breeds doubt and fear. Action breeds confidence and courage. If you want to conquer fear, do not sit home and think about it. Go out and get busy.


306. “there is only one way under high heaven to get the best of an argument—and that is to avoid it. Avoid it as you would avoid rattlesnakes and earthquakes.”


307. The people who help unselfishly are often taken for granted by others.


308. “Wanamaker learned this lesson early, but I personally had to blunder through this old world for a third of a century before it even began to dawn upon me that ninety-nine times out of a hundred, people don’t criticise themselves for anything no matter how wrong it may be.”


309. “There is nothing else that so kills the ambitions of a person as criticisms from superiors. I never criticize any-one. I believe in giving a person incentive to work. So I am anxious to praise but loath to find fault. If I like anything, I am hearty in my approbation and lavish in my praise.”


310. “In looking over a letter of one of his assistants, he would say, “Maybe if we were to phrase it this way it would be better.” He always gave people the opportunity to do things themselves; he never told his assistants to do things; he let them do them, let them learn from their mistakes.”


311. “The rapidity with which we forget is astonishing. So,”


312. Every successful person loves the game rather than winning it. You should enjoy the game as winning and losing is a part of the game.


313. “Any fool can criticize, condemn and complain—and most fools do. But it takes character and self-control to be understanding and forgiving. “A great man shows his greatness,” said Carlyle, “by the way he treats little men.”


314. One should always encourage people instead of demoralizing them. That is why encouragement can lead you to many things instead of punishment.


315. “El mismo Dios, señor, no se propone juzgar al hombre hasta el fin de sus días”


316. “A man convinced against his will Is of the same opinion still. Years”


317. “Talk about your own mistakes before criticising the other person.”


318. “Criticism is futile because it puts a person on the defensive and usually makes him strive to justify himself. Criticism is dangerous, because it wounds a person's precious pride, hurts his sense of importance, and arouses resentment.”


319. “The reason why rivers and seas receive the homage of a hundred mountain streams is that they keep below them. Thus they are able to reign over all the mountain streams. So the sage, wishing to be above men, putteth himself below them, wishing to be before them, he putteth himself behind them. Thus, though his place be above men, they do not feel his weight; though his place be before them, they do not count it an injury.”


320. “If you tell me how you get your feeling of importance, I'll tell you what you are.”


321. “John D. Rockefeller said that “the ability to deal with people is as purchasable a commodity as sugar or coffee. And I will pay more for that ability,”


322. “Judge not, that ye be not judged.” And”


323. “People who smile,” he said, “tend to manage, teach and sell more effectively, and to raise happier children. There’s far more information in a smile than a frown. That’s why encouragement is a much more effective teaching device than punishment.”


324. “when I went fishing, I didn’t think about what I wanted. I thought about what they wanted.”


325. “You must have a good time meeting people if you expect them to have a good time meeting you.”


326. “alrededor del quince por ciento del éxito financiero de cada uno se debe al conocimiento técnico, y alrededor del 85 por ciento se debe a la habilidad en la tecnología humana: la personalidad y la capacidad para tratar con la gente.”


327. “Control your temper. Remember, you can measure the size of a person by what makes him or her angry.”


328. “Tanto como anhelamos la aprobación, tenemos la condena”


329. “the expression one wears on one’s face is far more important than the clothes one wears on one’s back”


330. “Strategies for Influence” explores and shares the BIG IDEAS from the Leaders of Influence that can help you with your Career, Business, and Leadership. Click on any of the links below to explore the Big Ideas that have influenced our work and culture.


331. “We nourish the bodies of our children and friends and employees, but how seldom do we nourish their self-esteem?”


332. “when praise is specific, it comes across as sincere—not something the other person may be saying just to make one feel good.”


333. “I had all I could do to keep from breaking down, but I resolved I would not cry and have all those men make remarks about women not being able to handle a management job because they are too emotional.”


334. Actions and feelings go hand in hand.


335. “La diferencia entre la apreciación y la adulación es muy sencilla. Una es sincera y la otra no. Una procede del corazón; la otra sale de la boca. Una es altruista; la otra egoísta. Una despierta la admiración universal; la otra es universalmente condenada.”


336. “When we are dealing with people, let us remember we are not dealing with creatures of logic. We are dealing with creatures of emotion, creatures bristling with prejudices and motivated by pride and vanity.” – Dale Carnegie


337. “Praise is like sunlight to the warm human spirit; we cannot flower and grow without it. And yet, while most of us are only too ready to apply to others the cold wind of criticism, we are somehow reluctant to give our fellow the warm sunshine of praise.”


338. “Action breeds confidence and courage.”


339. “was proud of them because he himself had painted them. The order for the seats amounted to $90,000. Who do you suppose got the order—James Adamson or one of his competitors? From the time of this story until Mr. Eastman’s death,”


340. “Action seems to follow feeling, but really action and feeling go together; and by regulating the action, which is under the more direct control of the will, we can indirectly regulate the feeling, which is not. “Thus the sovereign voluntary path to cheerfulness, if our cheerfulness be lost, is to sit up cheerfully and to act and speak as if cheerfulness were already there. …”


341. “The royal road to a man’s heart is to talk to him about the things he treasures most.”


342. “I will chum with you, and suffer when you suffer, and laugh when you laugh. I will bite my tongue when impatient words come. I will keep saying as if it were a ritual: "He is nothing but a boy -- a little boy!”


343. “To change somebody's behavior, change the level of respect she receives by giving her a fine reputation to live up to. Act as though the trait you are trying to influence is already one of the person's outstanding characteristics.”


344. Your friends will excel you if you have true friends.


345. “Happiness doesn’t depend on outward conditions. It depends on inner conditions.”


346. People sometimes became invalids in order to win sympathy and attention, and get a feeling of importance.


347. “Did you ever stop to think that a dog is the only animal that doesn't have to work for a living? A hen has to lay eggs, a cow has to give milk, and a canary has to sing. But a dog makes his living by giving you nothing but love.”


348. “Abe Lincoln once remarked that “most folks are about as happy as they make up their minds to be.” He was right.”


349. “Lincoln, “with malice toward none, with charity for all,” held”


350. “ninety- nine times out of a hundred, people don’t criticize themselves for anything, no matter how wrong it may be. C”


351. “Don’t complain about the snow on your neighbor’s roof,” said Confucius, “when your own doorstep is unclean.”


352. “People rarely succeed unless they have fun in what they are doing.”


353. “If you teach a man anything, he will never learn.” Shaw was right.”


354. Criticism isn’t good because it puts people on defensive mode, and people find it easy to blame someone rather than take responsibility, which makes you lazier.


355. “The world is full of people who are grabbing and self-seeking. So the rare individual who unselfishly tries to serve others has an enormous advantage. He has little competition. Owen D. Young, a noted lawyer and one of America’s great business leaders, once said: “People who can put themselves in the place of other people who can understand the workings of their minds, need never worry about what the future has in store for them.”


356. “the person who has technical knowledge plus the ability to express ideas, to assume leadership, and to arouse enthusiasm among people—that person is headed for higher earning power.”


357. “Criticism is dangerous, because it wounds a person’s precious pride, hurts his sense of importance and arouses resentment.”


358. Desire is important.


359. Criticism wounds a person’s pride and hence tries to avoid it, which is hazardous.


360. “So, she merely remarked that it would make an excellent article for the North American Review. In other words, she praised it and at the same time subtly suggested that it wouldn’t do as a speech. Lyman Abbott saw the point,”


361. “People who smile,” he said, “tend to manage, teach and sell more effectively, and to raise happier children.”


362. When dealing with people, let us remember we are not dealing with creatures of logic. We are dealing with creatures of emotion, creatures bristling with prejudices and motivated by pride and vanity.


363. “Men must be taught as if you taught them not And things unknown proposed as things forgot. Over”


364. “The Value of a Smile at Christmas It costs nothing, but creates much. It enriches those who receive, without impoverishing those who give. It happens in a flash and the memory of it sometimes lasts forever. None are so rich they can get along without it, and none so poor but are richer for its benefits. It creates happiness in the home, fosters good will in a business, and is the countersign of friends.”


365. “Pasaré una sola vez por este camino; de modo que cualquier bien que pueda hacer o cualquier cortesía que pueda tener para con cualquier ser humano, que sea ahora. No la dejaré para mañana, ni la olvidaré, porque nunca más volveré a pasar por aquí." Emerson dijo: "Todo hombre que conozco es superior a mí en algún sentido. En ese sentido, aprendo de él".”


366. “Asking questions not only makes an order more palatable; it often stimulates the creativity of the persons whom you ask. People are more likely to accept an order if they have had a part in the decision that caused the order to be issued.”


367. “Mr. Funkhouser, I believe I can make money for you.”


368. “I discovered, quite by accident, how richly it sometimes pays to let the other person do the talking.” – Dale Carnegie


369. “The only reason, for example, that you are not a rattlesnake is that your mother and father weren't rattlesnakes. You deserve very little credit for being what you are”


370. “If a man’s heart is rankling with discord and ill feeling toward you, you can’t win him to your way of thinking with all the logic in Christendom. Scolding parents and domineering bosses and husbands and nagging wives ought to realize that people don’t want to change their minds. They can’t be forced or driven to agree with you or me. But they may possibly be led to, if we are gentle and friendly, ever so gentle and ever so friendly.”


371. “When one person yells the other should listen. When two people yell, there’s no communication.”


372. “it was necessary to bait the hook to suit the fish.”


373. “I have come to the conclusion that there is only one way under high heaven to get the best of an argument— and that is to avoid it. Avoid it as you would avoid rattlesnakes and earthquakes.”


374. “Begin with praise and honest appreciation.”


375. “Sigmund Freud said that everything you and I do springs from two motives: the sex urge and the desire to be great. John”


376. “Il est certain que le plus sûr moyen de connaître le bonheur serait de contrôler nos pensées. La félicité ne dépend pas des conditions extérieures, elle est régie par notre attitude mentale.”


377. “If you argue and rankle and contradict, you may achieve a victory sometimes; but it will be an empty victory because you will never get your opponent's good will.”


378. “I will speak ill of no man, and speak all the good I know of everybody.”


379. Three-fourths of the people you will meet are hungering for sympathy. Give it to them and they will love you.


380. “You may be right, dead right, as you speed along in your argument; but as far as changing another’s mind is concerned, you will probably be just as futile as if you were wrong. Frederick”


381. Develop success from failures. Discouragement and failure are two of the surest stepping stones to success.


382. Knowledge should stick to your mind and nothing else.


383. “As much as we seek approval, we dread condemnation”


384. “The legendary French aviation pioneer and author Antoine de Saint-Exupéry wrote: “I have no right to say or do anything that diminishes a man in his own eyes. What matters is not what I think of him, but what he thinks of himself. Hurting a man in his dignity is a crime.”


385. “If you tell me how you get your feeling of importance, I’ll tell you what you are.”


386. You can get many things by yielding instead of fighting with someone.


387. “Be wiser than other people if you can; but do not tell them so.”


388. The secret of success is to see from the other person’s angle.


389. “You can make more friends in two months by becoming interested in other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you. Yet”


390. “My popularity, my happiness and sense of worth depend to no small extent upon my skill in dealing with people.”


391. “The ability to speak is a shortcut to distinction. It puts a person in the limelight, raises one head and shoulders above the crowd. And the person who can speak acceptably is usually given credit for an ability out of all proportion to what he or she really possesses.”


392. “One can for example, hire mere technical ability in engineering, accountancy, architecture or any other profession at nominal salaries. But the person who has technical knowledge plus the ability to express ideas, to assume leadership, and to arouse enthusiasm among people—that person is headed for higher earning power.”


393. “Tell your child, your spouse, or your employee that he or she is stupid or dumb at a certain thing, has no gift for it, and is doing it all wrong, and you have destroyed almost every incentive to try to improve.”


394. “I have quit telling people they are wrong. And I find that it pays.”


395. “you can measure the size of a person by what makes him or her angry. Listen”


396. “The world is full of people who are grabbing and self-seeking. So the rare individual who unselfishly tries to serve others has an enormous advantage.” – Dale Carnegie


397. “All men have fears, but the brave put down their fears and go forward, sometimes to death, but always to victory.”


398. All men have fears, but the brave put down their fears and go forward.


399. “el único medio de influir sobre la gente es hablar acerca de lo que el otro quiere.”


400. “The Boston Transcript once printed this bit of significant doggerel: Here lies the body of William Jay, Who died maintaining his right of way— He was right, dead right, as he sped along, But he’s just as dead as if he were wrong. You”


401. “For “the great aim of education,” said Herbert Spencer, “is not knowledge but action.” And”


402. If you do a terrible thing, you will hear it many times; similarly, if you do two good things, you might not hear it after you do it.


403. “Be wiser than other people if you can, but do not tell them so.” – Dale Carnegie


404. “the deepest urge in human nature is “the desire to be important.”


405. “For Roosevelt knew, as all leaders know, that the royal road to a person’s heart is to talk about the things he or she treasures most.”


406. “Remember that other people may be totally wrong. But they don’t think so. Don’t condemn them. Any fool can do that. Try to understand them. Only wise, tolerant, exceptional people even try to do that.” – Dale Carnegie


407. “Three-fourths of the people you will ever meet are hungering and thirsting for sympathy. Give it to them, and they will love you.”


408. “Take a chance! All life is a chance. The man who goes furthest is generally the one who is willing to do and dare.”


409. “Frases insignificantes, como "Lamento molestarlo", "Tendría usted la bondad de...", "Quiere hacer el favor de...", "Tendría usted la gentileza", o "Gracias”; pequeñas cortesías como éstas sirven para aceitar las ruedas del monótono mecanismo de la vida diaria y, de paso, son la seña de la buena educación.”


410. In any language, names are the sweetest sounds.


411. “Only knowledge that is used sticks in your mind.” – Dale Carnegie


412. “Fear doesn’t exist anywhere except in the mind.”


413. “Instead of condemning people, let’s try to understand them. Let’s try to figure out why they do what they do. That’s a lot more profitable and intriguing than criticism; and it breeds sympathy, tolerance and kindness. “To know all is to forgive all.” ” – Dale Carnegie


414. “Three-fourths of the people you will meet tomorrow are hungering and thirsting for sympathy. Give it to them and they will love you.”


415. “There is only one way under high heaven to get anybody to do anything. Did you ever stop to think of that? Yes, just one way. And that is by making the other person want to do it.”


416. Temper should always be in control, or you will face the consequences.


417. “certain we are that it is justified. When dealing with people, let us remember we are not dealing with creatures of logic. We are dealing with creatures of emotion, creatures bristling with prejudices and motivated by pride and vanity.”


418. “I have known people,” he said, “who succeeded because they had a rip-roaring good time conducting their business. Later, I saw those people change as the fun became work. The business had grown dull.”


419. Remember a name and call it easily and you have paid a subtle and very effective compliment.


420. Praise is like sunlight to the warm human spirit; we cannot flower and grow without it.


421. “Winning friends begins with friendliness.”


422. “Dealing with people is probably the biggest problem you face,”


423. “J. Pierpont Morgan observed, in one of his analytical interludes, that a person usually has two reasons for doing a thing: one that sounds good and a real one. The person himself will think of the real reason. You don’t need to emphasize that. But all of us, being idealists at heart, like to think of motives that sound good. So, in order to change people, appeal to the nobler motives.”


424. Never try to spoon. feed others because they will never learn anything, and you will be wasting your own time on them.


425. “I consider my ability to arouse enthusiasm among my people,’ said Schwab, ‘the greatest asset I possess, and the way to develop the best that is in a person is by appreciation and encouragement.”


426. “the ability to deal with people is as purchasable a commodity as sugar or coffee. And I will pay more for that ability,” said John D., “than for any other under the sun.”


427. “Happiness doesn’t depend on any external conditions, it is governed by our mental attitude.” – Dale Carnegie


428. “So, because I had apologized and sympathized with her point of view, she began apologizing and sympathizing with my point of view. I had the satisfaction of controlling my temper, the satisfaction of returning kindness for an insult. I got infinitely more real fun out of making her like me than I could ever have gotten out of telling her to go and take a jump in the Schuylkill River.”


429. “Once I did bad and that I heard ever/Twice I did good, but that I heard never.”


430. “Recordemos que Emerson dijo: "Todos los hombres que encuentro son superiores a mí en algún sentido; y en tal sentido puedo aprender de todos".”


431. Success is getting what you want. Happiness is wanting what you get.


432. “When we hate our enemies, we are giving them power over us: power over our sleep, our appetites, our blood pressure, our health, and our happiness.”


433. “the average person is more interested in his or her own name than in all the other names on earth put together.”


434. “The unvarnished truth is that almost all the people you meet feel themselves superior to you in some way, and a sure way to their hearts is to let them realize in some subtle way that you recognize their importance, and recognize it sincerely.”


435. Judge not, that ye be not judged.


436. There is a reason why the other man thinks and acts as he does.


437. “That is what every successful person loves: the game. The chance for self-expression. The chance to prove his or her worth, to excel, to win. That is what makes foot-races, and hog-calling, and pie-eating contests. The desire to excel. The desire for a feeling of importance.”


438. “By becoming interested in the cause, we are less likely to dislike the effect.”


439. “Do the thing you fear to do and keep on doing it, that is the quickest and surest way ever yet discovered to conquer fear.”


440. The acute angle should always be avoided.


441. “The only way I can get you to do anything is by giving you what you want.” – Dale Carnegie


442. “It was this desire for a feeling of importance that led an uneducated, poverty-stricken grocery clerk to study some law books he found in the bottom of a barrel of household plunder that he had bought for fifty cents. You have probably heard of this grocery clerk. His name was Lincoln.”


443. It is correctly said that you can’t win an argument because you will still lose if you win.


444. “i really like reading books”


445. You want recognition of your true worth. You want a feeling that you are important in your little world.


446. The longer we argued, the more stubborn he became. So I decided to avoid an argument, change the subject, and give him appreciation.


447. “liberal with your encouragement, make the thing seem easy to do, let the other person know that you have faith in his ability to do it, that he has an undeveloped flair for it—and he will practice until the dawn comes in the window in order to excel.”


448. “Pasaré una sola vez por este camino; de modo que cualquier bien que pueda hacer o cualquier cortesía que pueda tener para con cualquier ser humano, que sea ahora. No la dejaré para mañana, ni la olvidaré, porque nunca más volveré a pasar por aquí."


449. “All men have fears, but the brave put down their fears and go forward, sometimes to death, but always to victory” was the motto of the King’s Guard in ancient Greece.”


450. “Instead of condemning people, let’s try to understand them. Let’s try to figure out why they do what they do. That’s a lot more profitable and intriguing than criticism; and it breeds sympathy, tolerance and kindness.”


451. “Big shots are only little shots who kept on shooting.”


452. “criticisms are like homing pigeons. They always return home.”


453. “Today is life, the only life you are sure of. Make the most of today. Get interested in something. Shake yourself awake. Develop a hobby. Let the winds of enthusiasm sweep through you. Live today with gusto.”


454. “To recall a voter’s name is statesmanship. To forget it is oblivion.”


455. “Education,” said Dr. John G. Hibben, former president of Princeton University, “is the ability to meet life’s situations.”


456. “We ride roughshod over the feelings of others, getting our own way, finding fault, issuing threats, criticizing a child or an employee in front of others, without even considering the hurt to the other person’s pride. Whereas a few minutes’ thought, a considerate word or two, a genuine understanding of the other person’s attitude, would go so far toward alleviating the sting!”


457. “Happiness doesn’t depend on any external conditions, it is governed by our mental attitude.”


458. “It enriches those who receive, without impoverishing those who give. It happens in a flash and the memory of it sometimes lasts forever.”


459. Do the hard jobs first. The easy jobs will take care of themselves.


460. “Fear not those who argue but those who dodge.”


461. “People who talk only of themselves think only of themselves. And "those people who think only of themselves," Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler, longtime president of Columbia University, said, "are hopelessly uneducated. They are not educated," said Dr. Butler, "no matter how instructed they may be.”


462. “As the Readers’s Digest once said: ‘Many persons call a doctor when all they want is an audience.”


463. “Say ‘Hello’ in tones that bespeak how pleased you are to have the person call.”


464. Success in dealing with people depends on a sympathetic grasp of the other person’s viewpoint.


465. “People trudge through most days with little excitement in their lives. But our digital age provides so many opportunities to give people an authentic view of who you are or what your company strives to be, thus creating touch points of commonality that draw you into closer friendship with others.”


466. “Doing business in the digital age is predicated on doing the business of humanity well.”


467. “If you tell me how you get your feeling of importance, I’ll tell you what you are. That determines your character.”


468. “Criticism is futile because it puts a man on the defensive, and usually makes him strive to justify himself. Criticism is dangerous, because it wounds a man’s precious pride, hurts his sense of importance, and arouses his resentment.” – Dale Carnegie


469. Learn from every man you meet in your life.


470. “Are you bored with life? Then throw yourself into some work you believe in with all your heart, live for it, die for it, and you will find happiness that you had thought could never be yours.”


471. “IF YOU WANT TO GATHER HONEY, DON’T KICK OVER THE BEEHIVE’ ON”


472. “Libraries and museums owe their richest collections to people who cannot bear to think that their names might perish from the memory of the race.”


473. “Praise is like sunlight to the warm human spirit; we cannot flower and grow without it. And yet, while most of us are only too ready to apply to others the cold wind of criticism, we are somehow reluctant to give our fellow the warm sunshine of praise.”*”


474. “If a person makes a statement that you think is wrong—yes, even that you know is wrong—isn’t it better to begin by saying: “Well, now, look. I thought otherwise, but I may be wrong. I frequently am. And if I am wrong, I want to be put right. Let’s examine the facts.” There’s magic, positive magic, in such phrases as: “I may be wrong. I frequently am. Let’s examine the facts.”


475. “Criticism is dangerous, because it wounds a person's pride, hurts his sense of importance, and arouse resentment”


476. “FATHER FORGETS W. Livingston Larned Listen, son: I am saying this as you lie asleep, one little paw crumpled under your cheek and the blond curls stickily wet on your damp forehead. I have stolen into your room alone. Just a few minutes ago, as I sat reading my paper in the library, a stifling wave of remorse”


477. We should always talk about others’ points of view and respect them. So that people will understand you and respect your point of view.


478. “criticism is dangerous, because it wounds a person's precious pride, hurt his sense of importace and arouse resentment.”


479. “all of us like people who admire us. Take”


480. “The world is full of people who are grabbing and self-seeking. So the rare individual who unselfishly tries to serve others has an enormous advantage.”


481. “Three -fourths of the people you will ever meet are hungering and thirsting for sympathy. Give it to them, and they will love you.” – Dale Carnegie


482. “PRINCIPLE 1 Don’t criticize, condemn or complain. PRINCIPLE 2 Give honest and sincere appreciation. PRINCIPLE 3 Arouse in the other person an eager want.”


483. “Half the nation savagely condemned these incompetent generals, but Lincoln, “with malice toward none, with charity for all,” held his peace. One of his favorite quotations was “Judge not, that ye be not judged.”


484. “As wise old Ben Franklin used to say: If you argue and rankle and contradict, you may achieve a victory sometimes; but it will be an empty victory because you will never get your opponent’s good will.”


485. “William Winter señaló una vez que la "expresión del yo es la necesidad dominante en el carácter humano".”


486. You can never teach a man about anything; you can just help him find his way.


487. “Don’t complain about the snow on your neighbour’s roof,” said Confucius, “when your own doorstep is unclean.” When”


488. “No juzgues si no quieres ser juzgado”


489. “God himself, sir, does not propose to judge man until the end of his days.”


490. Most of the important things in the world have been accomplished by people who have kept on trying when there seemed to be no hope at all.


491. You can’t win an argument. You can’t because if you lose it, you lose it; and if you win it, you lose it.


492. “One thing only I know, and that is that I know nothing.”


493. “White Motor Company’s plant struck for higher wages and a union shop, Robert F. Black, then president of the company,”


494. “John Wanamaker, founder of the American stores that bear his name, once confessed: ‘I learned thirty years ago that it is foolish to scold. I have enough trouble overcoming my own limitations without fretting over the fact that God has not seen fit to distribute evenly the gift of intelligence.”


495. “The rare individual who unselfishly tries to serve others has an enormous advantage.”


496. “It is the first time I have ever had the good fortune to meet the representatives of the employees of this great company, its officers and superintendents, together, and”


497. “Remember, today is the tomorrow you worried about yesterday.”


498. “Everyone who was ever a guest of Theodore Roosevelt was astonished at the range and diversity of his knowledge. Whether his visitor was a cowboy or a Rough Rider, a New York politician or a diplomat, Roosevelt knew what to say. And how was it done? The answer was simple. Whenever Roosevelt expected a visitor, he sat up late the night before, reading up on the subject in which he knew his guest was particularly interested. For”


499. “Shaw once remarked: “If you teach a man anything, he will never learn.”


500. “Abilities wither under criticism; They blossom under encouragement.” – Dale Carnegie


501. “So if you aspire to be a good conversationalist, be an attentive listener. To be interesting, be interested.”


502. Three-fourths of the people you will ever meet are hungering and thirsting for sympathy. Give it to them, and they will love you.


503. “Any fool can criticize, condemn and complain—and most fools do.”


504. “If you teach a man anything, he will never learn.”


505. “The little word ‘my’ is the most important one in human affairs, and properly to reckon with it is the beginning of wisdom. It has the same force whether it is ‘my’ dinner, ‘my’ dog, and ‘my’ house, or ‘my’ father, ‘my’ country, and ‘my’ God.”


506. “If we want to make friends, let’s put ourselves out to do things for other people—thins that require time, energy, unselfishness and thoughtfulness.” – Dale Carnegie


507. “to be genuinely interested in other people is a most important quality for a sales-person to possess—for any person, for that matter.”


508. “Do you know someone you would like to change and regulate and improve? Good! That is fine. I am all in favor of it. But why not begin on yourself? From a purely selfish standpoint, that is a lot more profitable than trying to improve others—yes, and a lot less dangerous. “Don’t complain about the snow on your neighbor’s roof,” said Confucius, “when your own doorstep is unclean.” When”


509. “Cuando tratamos con la gente debemos recordar que no tratamos con criaturas lógicas. Tratamos con criaturas emotivas, criaturas erizadas de prejuicios e impulsadas por el orgullo y la vanidad.”


510. “If some people are so hungry for a feeling of importance that they actually go insane to get it, imagine what miracle you and I can achieve by giving people honest appreciation this side of insanity.”


511. If you disagree with them you may be tempted to interrupt. But don’t. It is dangerous.


512. “It isn't what you have or who you are or where you are or what you are doing that makes you happy or unhappy. It is what you think about it.”


513. “If out of reading this book you get just one thing—an increased tendency to think always in terms of other people’s point of view, and see things from their angle—if you get that one thing out of this book, it may easily prove to be one of the building blocks of your career.” – Dale Carnegie


514. “Education,’ said Dr. John G. Hibben, former president of Princeton University, ‘is the ability to meet life’s situations.”


515. “Try leaving a friendly trail of little sparks of gratitude on your daily trips. You will be surprised how they will set small flames of friendship that will be rose beacons on your next visit.”


516. “If there is any one secret of success, it lies in the ability to get the other person’s point of view and see things from that person’s angle as well as from your own.” That”


517. “The sun can make you take off your coat more quickly than the wind; and kindliness, the friendly approach and appreciation can make people change their minds more readily than all the bluster and storming in the world. Remember”


518. There is only one way to get the best of an argument -- and that is to avoid it.


519. “For “the great aim of education,” said Herbert Spencer, “is not knowledge but action.” And this is an action book.”


520. “As Dr. Johnson said: “God himself, sir, does not propose to judge man until the end of his days.” Why should you and I?”


521. “said: “People who can put themselves in the place of other people, who can understand the workings of their minds, need never worry about what the future has in store for them.”


522. The great man always shows his greatness by respecting little people.


523. And so I had him thinking of me as a good conversationalist when, in reality, I had been merely a good listener and had encouraged him to talk.


524. “Knowledge isn’t power until it is applied.”


525. “Criticism is dangerous, because it wounds a person’s precious pride, hurt his sense of importace and arouse resentment.”


526. “A man usually has two reasons for doing a thing: the one that sounds good and the real one.”


527. Everyone has fear, but some sometimes go against it to achieve success, even to death.


528. “If there is any one secret of success,’ said Henry Ford, ‘it lies in the ability to get the other person’s point of view and see things from that person’s angle as well as from your own.”


529. People are more likely to accept an order if they had a part in the decision that caused the order to be issued.


530. It is effortless to criticize, condemn and complain about things, but a great character understands every situation and doesn’t criticize or blame others for it.


531. Everybody wants to be appreciated by others.


532. “Talk in terms of the other person’s interests.”


533. “A great man shows his greatness,” said Carlyle, “by the way he treats little men.”


534. Ridicule and abuse never do.


535. All men have fears, but the brave put down their fears and go forward, sometimes to death, but always to victory.


536. “Every act you have ever performed since the day you were born was performed because you wanted something.” – Dale Carnegie


537. “If you are not in the process of becoming the person you want to be, you are automatically engaged in becoming the person you don’t want to be.”


538. Beginning with praise is like the dentist who begins his work with Novocain.


539. “Cuando dos socios siempre están de acuerdo, uno de ellos no es necesario".”


540. “Working hard becomes a habit, a serious kind of fun. You get self-satisfaction from pushing your self to the limit, knowing that all the effort is going to pay off.” ― Mary Lou Retton


541. “If there is any one secret of success, it lies in the ability to get the other person’s point of view and see things from that person’s angle as well as from your own.” – Dale Carnegie


542. “Nine times out of ten, an argument ends with each of the contestants more firmly convinced than ever that he is absolutely right.”


543. “[You desire! You desire. You unmitigated ass.”


544. “Could my opponents be right? Partly right? Is there truth


545. If there is any one secret of success, it lies in the ability to get the other person’s point of view and see things from that person’s angle as well as from your own.


546. “In the heyday of his activity, John D. Rockefeller said that “the ability to deal with people is as purchasable a commodity as sugar or coffee. And I will pay more for that ability,” said John D., “than for any other under the sun.”


547. “Action springs out of what we fundamentally desire ”


548. We are often interested in those who have the same interests in us.


549. That is what every successful person loves: the game.


550. “Letting the other person feel that the idea is his or hers not only works in business and politics, it works in family life as well.”


551. “Instead of condemning people, let's try to understand them. Let's try to figure out why they do what they do. That's a lot more profitable and intriguing than criticism; and it breeds sympathy, tolerance and kindness. "To know all is to forgive all.”


552. “We are interested in others when they are interested in us.” – Dale Carnegie


553. “Winning friends begins with friendliness.” – Dale Carnegie


554. “Only knowledge that is used sticks in your mind.”


555. “Compared with what we ought to be, we are only half awake. We are making use of only a small part of our physical and mental resources. Stating the thing broadly, the human individual thus lives far within his limits. He possesses powers of various sorts which he habitually fails to use.”


556. “Instead of condemning people, let's try to understand them. Let's try to figure out why they do what they do. That's a lot more profitable and intriguing than criticism; and it breeds sympathy, tolerance and kindness. [...]


557. “PRINCIPLE 1 Don’t criticize, condemn or complain.”


558. “Alfred Adler, the famous Viennese psychologist, wrote a book entitled What Life Should Mean to You. In that book he says: “It is the individual who is not interested in his fellow men who has the greatest difficulties in life and provides the greatest injury to others.”


559. “People who can put themselves in the place of other people, who can understand the workings of their minds, need never worry about what the future has in store for them.”


560. “I am convinced now that nothing good is accomplished and a lot of damage can be done if you tell a person straight out that he or she is wrong. You only succeed in stripping that person of self-dignity and making yourself an unwelcome part of any discussion.”


561. “Esto es lo que hacía Schwab. Pero, ¿qué hace la persona común? Precisamente lo contrario. Si alguna cosa no le gusta, arma un escándalo; si le gusta, no dice nada.”


562. “Buddha said: “Hatred is never ended by hatred but by love,”


563. “La Rochefoucauld, the French philosopher, said: “If you want enemies, excel your friends; but if you want friends, let your friends excel you.”


564. “When dealing with people, let us remember we are not dealing with creatures of logic. We are dealing with creatures of emotion, creatures bristling with prejudices and motivated by pride and vanity.”


565. “You cannot teach a man anything; you can only help him to find it within himself.”