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550 Best Ikigai Quotes by Hector Garcia Puigcerver (2023)

1. “Bundle routine tasks—such as sending out invoices, making phone calls, and so on—and do them all at once.”


2. “When confronted with a big goal, try to break it down into parts and then attack each part one by one.”


3. “The Pomodoro Technique recommends 25 minutes of work and 5 minutes of rest for each cycle, but you can also do 50 minutes of work and 10 minutes of rest.”


4. “Düşündükleriniz, söyledikleriniz ve yaptıklarınız ahenk içinde olduğu sürece mutlu olursunuz.”


5. “Find your own IKIGAI by asking yourself how you want to serve your community. If you are undecided, remember your dreams from when you were younger, maybe in your youth. “


6. “Morita explained the idea of letting go of negative feelings with the following fable: A donkey that is tied to a post by a rope will keep walking around the post in an attempt to free itself, only to become more immobilized and attached to the post. The same thing applies to people with obsessive thinking who become more trapped in their own suffering when they try to escape from their fears and discomfort.5”


7. “Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way. ”


8. “A man is like a forest; individual and yet connected and dependent on others for growth. ” — Ken Mogi


9. “a happy man is too satisfied with the present to dwell on the future.”4”


10. “You don’t need to go to the gym for an hour every day or run marathons. As Japanese centenarians show us, all you need is to add movement to your day.”


11. “To focus on a task, we need: 1. To be in a distraction-free environment 2. To have control over what we are doing at every moment. ” — Hector Garcia


12. “8. Futurismo”


13. “The ten rules of ikigai We’ll conclude this journey with ten rules we’ve distilled from the wisdom of the long-living residents of Ogimi: Stay active; don’t retire. Those who give up the things they love doing and do well lose their purpose in life. That’s why it’s so important to keep doing things of value, making progress, bringing beauty or utility to others, helping out, and shaping the world around you, even after your “official” professional activity has ended. Take it slow. Being in a hurry is inversely proportional to quality of life. As the old saying goes, “Walk slowly and you’ll go far.” When we leave urgency behind, life and time take on new meaning. Don’t fill your stomach. Less is more when it comes to eating for long life, too. According to the 80 percent rule, in order to stay healthier longer, we should eat a little less than our hunger demands instead of stuffing ourselves. Surround yourself with good friends. Friends are the best medicine, there for confiding worries over a good chat, sharing stories that brighten your day, getting advice, having fun, dreaming . . . in other words, living. Get in shape for your next birthday. Water moves; it is at its best when it flows fresh and doesn’t stagnate. The body you move through life in needs a bit of daily maintenance to keep it running for a long time. Plus, exercise releases hormones that make us feel happy. Smile. A cheerful attitude is not only relaxing—it also helps make friends. It’s good to recognize the things that aren’t so great, but we should never forget what a privilege it is to be in the here and now in a world so full of possibilities. Reconnect with nature. Though most people live in cities these days, human beings are made to be part of the natural world. We should return to it often to recharge our batteries. Give thanks. To your ancestors, to nature, which provides you with the air you breathe and the food you eat, to your friends and family, to everything that brightens your days and makes you feel lucky to be alive. Spend a moment every day giving thanks, and you’ll watch your stockpile of happiness grow. Live in the moment. Stop regretting the past and fearing the future. Today is all you have. Make the most of it. Make it worth remembering. Follow your ikigai. There is a passion inside you, a unique talent that gives meaning to your days and drives you to share the best of yourself until the very end. If you don’t know what your ikigai is yet, as Viktor Frankl says, your mission is to discover it.”


14. “Avoid spending time doing things we don’t enjoy”


15. “What is my objective for today’s session in the studio? ▪ How many words am I going to write today for the article coming out next month? ▪ What is my team’s mission? ▪ How fast will I set the metronome tomorrow in order to play that sonata at an allegro tempo by the end of the week?”


16. “People can feel real ikigai only when, on the basis of personal maturity, the satisfaction of various desires, love, and happiness, encounters with others, and a sense of value of life, they proceed towards self-realization. ” — Tsukasa Kobayashi


17. “In an interview after Jobs’s death, Shakunaga said he was very proud that his work had been appreciated by the man who created the iPhone. He added that Jobs’s last purchase from him had been a set of twelve teacups. Jobs had asked for something special, “a new style.” To satisfy this request, Shakunaga made 150 teacups in the process of testing out new ideas. Of these, he chose the twelve best and sent them to the Jobs family.”


18. “He was simply someone in search of a new life’s purpose; as soon as he found it, his life took on deeper meaning.”


19. “To be able to concentrate for a considerable amount of time is essential to difficult achievement.”


20. “Only staying active will make you want


21. “It’s not what happens to you, but how you react that matters.”


22. “Discover your life’s purpose. We can’t control our emotions, but we can take charge of our actions every day. This is why we should have a clear sense of our purpose, and always keep Morita’s mantra in mind: “What do we need to be doing right now? What action should we be taking?” The key to achieving this is having dared to look inside yourself to find your ikigai.”


23. “Defalarca ne yapıyorsak oyuz. Bu yüzden mükemmellik bir eylem değil, bir alışkanlıktır.”


24. “As Nassim Nicholas Taleb explains in Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder,4 we use the word fragile to describe people, things, and organizations that are weakened when harmed, and the words robust and resilient for things that are able to withstand harm without weakening, but we don’t have a word for things that get stronger when harmed (up to a point).”


25. “When doing business in Japan, process, manners, and how you work on something is more important than the final results.”


26. “Science has shown that sleep is a key antiaging tool, because when we sleep we generate melatonin, a hormone that occurs naturally in our bodies. The pineal gland produces it from the neurotransmitter serotonin according to our diurnal and nocturnal rhythms, and it plays a role in our sleep and waking cycles. A powerful antioxidant, melatonin helps us live longer, and also offers the following benefits: It strengthens the immune system. It contains an element that protects against cancer. It promotes the natural production of insulin. It slows the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. It helps prevent osteoporosis and fight heart disease.”


27. “Learn why the world wags and what wags it. That is the only thing which the mind can never exhaust, never alienate, never be tortured by, never fear or distrust, and never dream of regretting.”


28. “We don’t create the meaning of our life, we discover it!”


29. “Ikigai is the reason why some people wake up energized and excited every morning, while others drag themselves out of bed with dread.” – Neil Pasricha


30. “Solo si amas lo que haces lograrás resultados increíbles.”


31. “He who has a why to live for can bear with almost any how.”


32. “Igigai is the action we take in pursuit of happiness. ” — Yukari Mitsuhashi


33. “Existential frustration arises when our life is without purpose, or when that purpose is skewed.”


34. “Hayatımızın anlamını biz yaratmayız, onu keşfederiz.”


35. “We’re all going to die. Some people are scared of dying. Never be afraid to die. Because you’re born to die.”


36. “another central tenet of Stoicism is knowing what we can control and what we can’t,”


37. “To focus on a task we need: 1. To be in a distraction-free environment 2. To have control over what we are doing at every moment”


38. “To satisfy this request, Shakunaga made 150 teacups in the process of testing out new ideas. Of these, he chose the twelve best and sent them to the Jobs family.”


39. “This book first came into being on a rainy night in Tokyo, when its authors sat down together for the first time in one of the city’s tiny bars. We had read each other’s”


40. “To be able to concentrate for a considerable amount of time is essential to difficult achievement. ” — Hector Garcia


41. “Living your ikigai means living with purpose, passion, and meaning, and embracing the challenges and opportunities that come with it.” – Shingai Mavima


42. “Spend no more than twenty minutes on Facebook per day”


43. “Your ikigai is the treasure map that leads you to the treasure of your life, the ultimate destination of your journey.” – Neil Pasricha CHANCE THE RAPPER FAMOUS QUOTES


44. “Precisión”


45. “which help us enter a state of flow. When we have only a big goal in front of us, we might feel lost or overwhelmed by it; rituals help us by giving us the process, the substeps, on the path to achieving a goal. When confronted with a big goal, try to break it down into parts and then attack each part one by one.”


46. “una actitud que podemos cultivar para mantenernos centrados en lo importante de la vida en vez de en lo urgente, sin”


47. “Have a clear, concrete objective”


48. “appreciate the beauty of imperfection as an opportunity for growth.”


49. “One surprising thing you notice, living in Japan, is how active people remain after they retire. In fact, many Japanese people never really retire—they keep doing what they love for as long as their health allows.”


50. “If we want to get better at reaching a state of flow, meditation is an excellent antidote to our smartphones and their notifications constantly clamoring for our attention.”


51. “Morita explained the idea of letting go of negative feelings with the following fable: A donkey that is tied to a post by a rope will keep walking around the post in an attempt to free itself, only to become more immobilized and attached to the post. The same thing applies to people with obsessive thinking who become more trapped in their own suffering when they try to escape from their fears and discomfort. ”


52. ‘Young people often say that they have nothing to live for. But that is natural. Isolated people have no reason to live. What makes life worth living is human relationships. Human beings were not created to live alone. Buried in the mire of human relationships, the warmth of human skin gives us a reason to live.’


53. “Yedi kez düş, sekiz kez kalk."


54. “It's very easy to find happiness. Just grab a bottle of your favorite drink, devour foods that give you so much comfort and stress-relief, go for a run (happy hormones), or watch an NBA championship game at ringside! It's as instant as microwaveable foods! But joy is a different thing. Joy takes time to build, but it's worth the time. And one of the best ways to find joy in life is by discovering and living out our purpose - the reason why we've been put on this Earth! There's something about being in one's purpose and living it out.”


55. “Ikigai is the ultimate form of self-care, the practice of nurturing your physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being, and living a balanced and harmonious life.” – Hector Garcia Puigcerver


56. ‘If one sees the meaning, or intrinsic nature of experience, more like ikigai, they can appreciate that change. Probably these people may not see it as a problem, it’s something that.. some learning experience or some different path. That’s where ikigai and resilience come across each other. That resilience is also this ability to bounce back from difficulties. And for those who live with ikigai, can appreciate and find meaning in life’s difficulties.’


57. “The grand essentials to happiness in this life are something to do, something to love, and something to hope for.”2”


58. “radio taiso”


59. Fluid


60. “La regla de las diez mil horas”


61. “The happiest people are not the ones who achieve the most. They are the ones who spend more time than others in a state of flow.”


62. “Metabolism slows down 90 percent after 30 minutes of sitting.”


63. “There is no future, no past. There is only the present.”


64. “It is much more important to have a compass pointing to a concrete objective than to have a map. ”


65. “Di sebuah dunia tempat nilai kita sebagai seorang manusia dan harga-diri kita utamanya ditentukan oleh kesuksesan kita, banyak orang meng­alami tekanan yang tidak diperlukan. Anda mungkin merasa bahwa sistem nilai apa pun yang Anda anut hanya akan bernilai dan dikukuhkan jika ia terwujud menjadi prestasi-prestasi konkret—sebuah promosi, contohnya, atau investasi yang menguntungkan.”


66. “Based on his own experience, Frankl believed that our health depends on that natural tension that comes from comparing what we’ve accomplished so far with what we’d like to achieve in the future. What we need, then, is not a peaceful existence, but a challenge we can strive to meet by applying all the skills at our disposal.”


67. “What do Japanese artisans, engineers, Zen philosophy, and cuisine have in common? Simplicity and attention to detail. It is not a lazy simplicity but a sophisticated one that searches out new frontiers, always taking the object, the body and mind, or the cuisine to the next level, according to one’s ikigai.”


68. “We should never forget that everything we have and all the people we love will disappear at some point. This is something we should keep in mind, but without giving in to pessimism.”


69. “Concentrating on one thing at a time may be the single most important factor in achieving flow. ” — Hector Garcia


70. “You don’t need to go to the gym for an hour every day or run marathons. As Japanese centenarians show us, all you need is to add movement to your day. Practicing any of these Eastern disciplines on a regular basis is a great way to do so. An added benefit is that they all have well-defined steps, and as we saw in chapter IV, disciplines with clear rules are good for flow. If you don’t like any of these disciplines, feel free to choose a practice that you love and that makes you move.”


71. Don’t seek the perfect life instead seek the happy life


72. Intraday chart for Ikigai Ventures Limited. 5-day change. 1st Jan Change


73. “In Zen Buddhism, meditation is a way to become aware of our desires and emotions and thereby free ourselves from them. It is not simply a question of keeping the mind free of thoughts but instead involves observing our thoughts and emotions as they appear, without getting carried away by them. In this way, we train our minds not to get swept up in anger, jealousy, or resentment.”


74. “His experiences as a prisoner at Auschwitz showed him that “Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”


75. “Ogimi,”


76. “Our ikigai is different for all of us, but one thing we have in common is that we are all searching for meaning. When we spend our days feeling connected to what is meaningful to us, we live more fully; when we lose the connection, we feel despair. Modern life estranges us more and more from our true nature, making it very easy for us to lead lives lacking in meaning. Powerful forces and incentives (money, power, attention, success) distract us on a daily basis; don’t let them take over your life.”


77. “There is a tension between what is good for someone and what they want to do. This is because people, especially older people, like to do things as they've always done them. The problem is that when the brain develops ingrained habits, it doesn't need to think anymore. Things get done very quickly and efficiently on automatic pilot, often in a very advantageous way. This creates a tendency to stick to routines, and the only way of breaking these is to confront the brain with new information.”


78. “A powerful antioxidant, melatonin helps us live longer, and also offers the following benefits: ▪ It strengthens the immune system. ▪ It contains an element that protects against cancer. ▪ It promotes the natural production of insulin. ▪ It slows the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. ▪ It helps prevent osteoporosis and fight heart disease.”


79. “A donkey that is tied to a post by a rope will keep walking around the post in an attempt to free itself, only to become more immobilized and attached to the post. The same thing applies to people with obsessive thinking who become more trapped in their own suffering when they try to escape from their fears and discomfort.”


80. “the things we love are like the leaves of a tree: They can fall at any moment with a gust of wind. He also said that changes in the world around us are not accidental but rather form part of the essence of the universe”


81. Samsung Galaxy S9


82. “According to a study by Boston Consulting Group, when asked about their bosses, the number one complaint of employees at multinational corporations is that they don’t “communicate the team’s mission clearly,” and that, as a result, the employees don’t know what their objectives are.”


83. “Our intuition and curiosity are very powerful internal compasses to help us connect with our ikigai.”


84. “Walk slowly and you’ll go far.”


85. “Write all of them on a piece of paper, then ask yourself these questions: What do the activities that drive you to flow have in common? Why do those activities drive you to flow? For example, are all the activities you most like doing ones that you practice alone or with other people? Do you flow more when doing things that require you to move your body or just to think?”


86. “We are what we repeatedly do.


87. “There is a tension between what is good for someone and what they want to do. This is because people, especially older people, like to do things as they’ve always done them. The problem is that when the brain develops ingrained habits, it doesn’t need to think anymore. Things get done very quickly and efficiently on automatic pilot, often in a very advantageous way. This creates a tendency to stick to routines, and the only way of breaking these is to confront the brain with new information.”


88. “He who has a why to live for can bear with almost anyhow. ”


89. “One of the first words one learns when starting Japanese lessons is ganbaru, which means “to persevere” or “to stay firm by doing one’s best.”


90. “A donkey that is tied to a post by a rope will keep walking around the post in an attempt to free itself, only to become more immobilized and attached to the post. The same thing applies to people with obsessive thinking who become more trapped in their own suffering when they try to escape from their fears and discomfort.” (Ikigai Quotes)


91. “«todo le puede ser arrebatado a una persona, excepto una cosa, la última de las libertades humanas: la elección de cómo se enfrenta uno a las circunstancias que le son dadas, la elección del propio camino».”


92. “For many, helping others might be an ikigai strong enough to keep them alive.”


93. Don’t hide them, welcome them


94. “Being busy is not the same as being fulfilled. Only when your work aligns with your ikigai can you truly experience a sense of purpose and satisfaction.” – Shingai Mavima


95. “Yiyin ve uyuyun. Uzun yaşarsınız o zaman”


96. “The purpose of life is a life of purpose. ” — Robert Byrne


97. “«quien tiene un porqué para vivir, puede soportar casi cualquier cómo».”


98. “The grand essentials to happiness in this life are something to do, something to love, and something to hope for.”


99. “Essentials to happiness in this life are something to do, something to love, and something to hope for. ” — Hector Garcia


100. “God, give us grace to accept with serenity


101. “Ikigai is not a concept, but a way of life. It’s about finding joy in the simple things, cherishing your relationships, and doing work that makes a difference.” – Hector Garcia Puigcerver


102. “os segredos para uma vida longa são a dieta, o exercício, ter um propósito (um ikigai) e boas ligações sociais, ou seja, muitos amigos e boas relações na família.”


103. “We often think that combining tasks will save us time, but scientific evidence shows that it has the opposite effect. Even those who claim to be good at multitasking are not very productive. In fact, they are some of the least productive people. Our brains can take million bits of information but can only actually process of few dozen per second. When we say we're multitasking, what we're really doing is switching back and forth between tasks very quickly. Unfortunately, we're not computers adept at parallel processing. We end up spending all our energy alternative between tasks, instead of focusing on doing one of them well. Concentrating on one thing at a time may be the single most important factor in achieving flow.”


104. “when you have a clear purpose, no one can stop you.”


105. “Métela en un sobre, ponle tu propia dirección y, después de pegarle un sello, échala a un buzón de correos.”


106. “Es decir, si eres feliz con lo que tienes en tu vida y no deseas nada que no poseas ahora mismo, serás más feliz que alguien que tiene mucho más que tú, pero sigue deseando cosas que no posee.”


107. The future depends on what you do today


108. ‘I think it’s about a sense of purpose, feeling a sense of purpose. I specifically say feeling a sense of purpose separate from purpose because it is used casually. I can imagine being on a fishing boat with a friend and seeing the waves and seeing the sun and catching a fish and looking over and saying, “Wow, this really gives me a sense of ikigai!”. It is this sense of purpose, of living in a moment that makes you feel alive. That’s what I think ikigai is about. It’s the sense of having a purpose and a sense of living, a sense of being present. I think for some people it can tie to your actual purpose in life if you do find one, but I don’t think it has to be that by any means.’


109. ‘There is nothing more for humans to live life fully than ikigai. Therefore, there is no cruelty greater than to deprive humans of their ikigai. And there is no greater love than to give humans their ikigai.’


110. “The Seven Conditions for Achieving Flow According to researcher Owen Schaffer of DePaul University, the requirements for achieving flow are: 1. Knowing what to do 2. Knowing how to do it 3. Knowing how well you are doing 4. Knowing where to go (where navigation is involved) 5. Perceiving significant challenges 6. Perceiving significant skills 7. Being free from distractions”


111. “The funny thing is that someone else might really enjoy the same task, but we want to finish as quickly as possible. What makes us enjoy doing something so much that we forget about whatever worries we might have while we do it? When are we happiest? These questions can help us discover our ikigai.”


112. “It has been scientifically shown that if we continually ask our brains to switch back and forth between tasks, we waste time, make more mistakes, and remember less of what we’ve done.”


113. “Por todos estos motivos, la melatonina es un gran aliado de la juventud sostenida.”


114. “What do takumis (artisans), engineers, inventors, and otakus (fans of anime and manga) have in common? They all understand the importance of flowing with their ikigai at all times.”


115. “longevity, a woman who was about to turn 100 years old sang the following song for us in a mixture of Japanese and the local dialect: To keep healthy and have a long life, eat just a little of everything with relish, go to bed early, get up early, and then go out for a walk. We live each day with serenity and we enjoy the journey. To keep healthy and have a long life, we get on well with all of our friends. Spring, summer, fall, winter, we happily enjoy all the seasons. The secret is to not get distracted by how old the fingers are; from the fingers to the head and back once again. If you keep moving with your fingers working, 100 years will come to you.*”


116. “the keys to longevity are diet, exercise, finding a purpose in life (an ikigai), and forming strong social ties—”


117. “The Japanese word ikigai is formed of two Japanese characters, or kanji: 'iki' meaning life, and 'gai' meaning came or worth. Ikigai, then, is the value of life, or happiness in life. Put simply, it's the reason you get up in the morning.”


118. “A happy man is too satisfied with the present to dwell on the future. ” — Hector Garcia


119. “Concentrating on one thing at a time may be the single most important factor in achieving flow”


120. “This is why we should have a clear sense of our purpose, and always keep Morita’s mantra in mind: “What do we need to be doing right now? What action should we be taking?” The key to achieving this is having dared to look inside yourself to find your ikigai.”


121. “To keep healthy and have a long life, eat just a little of everything with relish, go to bed early, get up early, and then go out for a walk. We live each day with serenity and we enjoy the journey. To keep healthy and have a long life, we get on well with all of our friends. Spring, summer, fall, winter, we happily enjoy all the seasons. The secret is to not get distracted by how old the fingers are; from the fingers to the head and back once again. If you keep moving with your fingers working, 100 years will come to you. *”


122. “A wise person can live with these pleasures but should always remain conscious of how easy it is to be enslaved by them.”


123. “The documentary Jiro Dreams of Sushi gives us another example of a takumi, this time in the kitchen. Its protagonist has been making”


124. “What often happens, especially in big companies, is that the executives get lost in the details of obsessive planning, creating strategies to hide the fact that they don’t have a clear objective. It’s like heading out to sea with a map but no destination. It is much more important to have a compass pointing to a concrete objective than to have a map. Joi Ito, director of the MIT Media Lab, encourages us to use the principle of “compass over maps” as a tool to navigate our world of uncertainty.”


125. “The students who were the most addicted to multitasking typically alternated among more than four tasks; for example, taking notes while reading a textbook, listening to a podcast, answering messages on their smartphone, and sometimes checking their Twitter timeline.”


126. “No te preocupes demasiado por el futuro lejano.”


127. “Concentrating on one thing at a time may be the single most important factor in achieving flow.”


128. “Your ikigai lies at the intersection of what you are good at, what you love doing, what the world needs, and what you can be paid for.” – Neil Pasricha


129. “Having a clear objective is important in achieving flow, but we also have to know how to leave it behind when we get down to business. Once the journey has begun, we should keep this objective in mind without obsessing over it.”


130. Do what you can be rewarded for


131. “As the quip attributed to Einstein goes, “Put your hand on a hot stove for a minute and it seems like an hour. Sit with a pretty girl for an hour, and it seems like a minute. That is relativity.”


132. “▪ Stop snacking between meals ▪ Eat sweets only once a week ▪ Gradually pay off all debt ▪ Avoid spending time with toxic people ▪ Avoid spending time doing things we don’t enjoy, simply because we feel obligated to do them ▪ Spend no more than twenty minutes on Facebook per day”


133. “Your ikigai is the source of your vitality, the spark that ignites your creativity, and the force that drives you towards your goals.” – Hector Garcia Puigcerver


134. “Along with the experience of joy, the experience of suffering also makes life worth living. When we encounter adversity, we endure suffering, challenge it, and overcome it, which makes our life worth living. ” — Professor Yoshikazu Ueda


135. “Living your ikigai means living with passion, purpose, and integrity, and making a positive impact on the world around you.” – Shingai Mavima


136. “Taking a hit or two can be viewed as either a misfortune or an experience that we can apply to all areas of our lives, as we continually make corrections and set new and better goals.”


137. “flow is “the state in which people are so involved in an activity that nothing else seems to matter; the experience itself is so enjoyable that people will do it even at great cost, for the sheer sake of doing it.”


138. “Find your own ikigai by asking yourself how you want to serve your community. If you are undecided, remember your dreams from when you were younger, maybe in your youth. ” — Tsutomu Hotta


139. “Every day I say to myself, ‘Today will be full of health and energy. Live it to the fullest.”


140. “Imagine that a writer has to finish a novel in three months. The objective is clear; the problem is that the writer can't stop obsessing over it. Every day she wakes up thinking, "I have to write that novel," and every day she sets about reading the newspaper and cleaning the house. Every evening she feels frustrated and promises she'll get to work the next day. Days, weeks, and months pass, and the writer still has't gotten anything down on the page, when all it would have taken was to sit down and get that first word out, then the second . . . to flow with the project, expressing their ikigai. As soon as you take these first small steps, your anxiety will disappear and you will achieve a pleasant flow in the activity you're doing.”


141. “In other words, those who face challenges with a positive outlook and are able to manage their emotions are already well on their way toward longevity.”


142. “10. Valentía”


143. “Again, the mysterious ikigai. But what is it, exactly? How do you get it? It never ceased to surprise us that this haven of nearly eternal life was located precisely in Okinawa, where two hundred thousand innocent lives were lost at the end of World War II. Rather than harbor animosity toward outsiders, however, Okinawans live by the principle of ichariba chode, a local expression that means “treat everyone like a brother, even if you’ve”


144. “Walk to work, or just go on a walk for at least twenty minutes each day. ▪ Use your feet instead of an elevator or escalator. This is good for your posture, your muscles, and your respiratory system, among other things. ▪ Participate in social or leisure activities so that you don’t spend too much time in front of the television. ▪ Replace your junk food with fruit and you’ll have less of an urge to snack, and more nutrients in your system. ▪ Get the right amount of sleep. Seven to nine hours is good, but any more than that makes us lethargic. ▪ Play with children or pets, or join a sports team. This not only strengthens the body but also stimulates the mind and boosts self-esteem. ▪ Be conscious of your daily routine in order to detect harmful habits and replace them with more positive ones.”


145. “One thing that everyone with a clearly defined ikigai has in common is that they pursue their passion no matter what. They never give up, even when the cards seem stacked against them or they face one hurdle after another.”


146. “Ikigai is unique to every individual and is the reason why people wake up every morning. ” — Dr. Johanna Lamm


147. “Fall seven times, rise eight.”


148. “Defalarca ne yapıyorsak oyuz.


149. “Try to let go of the quest for perfection and instead accept the beauty that lies in all of life’s imperfections. The result will be extra energy, less stress, and a longer life. ” — Blinkist


150. “Along with the experience of joy, the experience of suffering also makes life worth living. When we encounter adversity, we endure suffering, challenge it, and overcome it, which makes our life worth living.”


151. “Soaking up a moderate amount of sun each day.”


152. “Albert Einstein, “a happy man is too satisfied with the present to dwell on the future.”4”


153. “The term”


154. “«Somos lo que hacemos día a día. La excelencia no es un acto, sino un hábito.» ARISTÓTELES”


155. “Read and respond to e-mail only once or twice per day. Define those times clearly and stick to them.”


156. “It is more important to have a compass pointing to a concrete object than to have a map. ” — Hector Garcia


157. “Doing many different things every day. Always staying busy, but doing one thing at a time, without getting overwhelmed.”


158. We all are dependent on each other to grow


159. “Ikigai is the art of staying young while growing old, the secret of happiness and longevity that the people of Okinawa have discovered.” – Hector Garcia Puigcerver


160. “According to scientists who have studied the five Blue Zones, the keys to longevity are diet, exercise, finding a purpose in life (an ikigai), and forming strong social ties—that is, having a broad circle of friends and good family relations.”


161. “Life is not a problem to be solved. ” — Hector Garcia


162. “«A veces escribo mejor de lo que sé».”


163. “Is the point just to live longer, or should I seek a higher purpose?”


164. Live the moment. Live in the present


165. “1. Responsabilidad”


166. Stay happy. Stay active


167. “essentials to happiness in this life are something to do, something to love, and something to hope for. ”


168. “The secret is smiling and having a good time.”


169. “The grand essentials to happiness in this life are something to do, something to love, and something to hope for. ”


170. “Mindfulness is the basic human ability to be fully present, aware of where we are and what we’re doing, and not overly reactive or overwhelmed by what’s going on around us.”


171. “jamás se rinden,”


172. “Keep going; don’t change your path.”


173. “Just possibly, ikigai, makes a Peter Pan of all of us. ” — Ken Mogi


174. “Even those who claim to be good at multitasking are not very productive. In fact, they are some of the least productive people.”


175. “We often think that combining tasks will save us time, but scientific evidence shows that it has the opposite effect. Even those who claim to be good at multitasking are not very productive. In fact, they are some of the least productive people. Our brains can take million bits of information but can only actually process of few dozen per second. When we say we’re multitasking, what we’re really doing is switching back and forth between tasks very quickly. Unfortunately, we’re not computers adept at parallel processing. We end up spending all our energy alternative between tasks, instead of focusing on doing one of them well. Concentrating on one thing at a time may be the single most important factor in achieving flow.”


176. “Being in a hurry is inversely proportional to quality of life. ” — Hector Garcia


177. “Foods that should be eliminated are refined sugar and grains, processed baked goods, and prepared foods, along with cow’s milk and all its derivatives.”


178. “O tipo de vida que uma pessoa leva é tão ou mais importante para a longevidade”,”


179. “Try the Pomodoro Technique: Get yourself a kitchen timer (some are made to look like a pomodoro, or tomato) and commit to working on a single task as long as it’s running. The Pomodoro Technique recommends 25 minutes of work and 5 minutes of rest for each cycle, but you can also do 50 minutes of work and 10 minutes of rest. Find the pace that’s best for you; the most important thing is to be disciplined in completing each cycle.”


180. “Your ikigai is the essence of your being, the core of your identity, and the foundation of your legacy.” – Neil Pasricha


181. “the keys to longevity are diet, exercise, finding a purpose in life (an ikigai), and forming strong social ties—that is, having a broad circle of friends and good family relations. Members of these communities manage their time well in order to reduce stress, consume little meat or processed foods, and drink alcohol in moderation.1 They don’t do strenuous exercise, but they do move every day, taking walks and working in their vegetable gardens. People in the Blue Zones would rather walk than drive. Gardening, which involves daily low-intensity movement, is a practice almost all of them have in common.”


182. “According to Stoicism, our pleasures and desires are not the problem. We can enjoy them as long as they don’t take control of us.”


183. “Escríbete una larga carta en la que explicas a un misterioso maestro todo lo que te preocupa, todas tus dudas y preguntas.”


184. “Nurturing friendships, eating light, getting enough rest, and doing regular, moderate exercise are all part of the equation of good health,”


185. “Our neurons start to age while we are still in our twenties. This process is slowed, however, by intellectual activity, curiosity, and a desire to learn. Dealing with new situations, learning something new every day, playing games, and interacting with other people seem to be essential antiaging strategies for the mind.”


186. “It’s wonderful that as human beings, we have an ikigai enabling us to experience that. ” — Professor Gordon Mathews


187. “the happiness of always being busy,”


188. “One widespread stereotype about people in Japan is that they're exceptionally dedicated and hardworking, even though some Japanese people say they look like they're working harder than they really are. There is no doubt, though, about their ability to be completely absorbed in a task, or about their perseverance when there is a problem to be solved. One of the first words one learns when starting Japanese lessons is ganbaru, which means "to persevere" or "to stay firm by doing one's best." Japanese people often apply themselves to even the most basic tasks with an intensity that borders on obsession. We see this in all kinds of contexts, from the "retirees" taking meticulous care of their rice fields in the mountains on Nagano to the college students working the weekend shift in convenience stores known as kobinis. If you go to Japan, you'll experience this attention to detail firsthand in almost every transaction.”


189. “From this, he concluded that a small dose of stress is a positive thing, as those who live with low levels of stress tend to develop healthier habits, smoke less, and drink less alcohol.2 Given this, it is not surprising that many of the supercentenarians—people who live to be 110 or more—whom we’ll meet in this book talk about having lived intense lives and working well into old age. A”


190. “In the here and now, the only thing in my life is your life.” いまここにしかないわたし


191. “Albert Einstein, “a happy man is too satisfied with the present to dwell on the future.”


192. “¿Qué no voy a hacer con mi vida?”


193. “the people who live the longest have two dispositional traits in common: a positive attitude and a high degree of emotional awareness. In other words, those who face challenges with a positive outlook and are able to manage their emotions are already well on their way toward longevity.”


194. Life is all about your perspective


195. “There is no future, no past. There is only the present. ” — Hector Garcia


196. “Rather than harbor animosity toward outsiders, however, Okinawans live by the principle of ichariba chode, a local expression that means “treat everyone like a brother, even if you’ve never met them before.”


197. “encuentra la felicidad en lo que ya tiene, mientras que el niño la busca en lo que le falta. ¿Cómo elegir tu camino entre tantas opciones?”


198. “Be led by your curiosity, and keep busy by doing things that fill you with meaning and happiness. ”


199. “■ El hombre no inventa el sentido de su existencia, como decía Sartre, sino que lo descubre”


200. “We often think that combining tasks will save us time, but scientific evidence shows that it has the opposite effect. Even those who claim to be good at multitasking are not very productive. In fact, they are some of the least productive people.”


201. “the moment. Stop regretting the past and fearing the future. Today is all you have. Make the most of it. Make it worth remembering.”


202. “It was not, however, an artisan from Kyoto who won Steve Jobs’s devotion, but rather a takumi from Toyama named Yukio Shakunaga, who used a technique called Etchu Seto-yaki, known by only a few.”


203. “One way to reach a state of mindfulness is through meditation, which helps filter the information that reaches us from the outside world. It can also be achieved through breathing exercises, yoga, and body scans. ”


204. “Ikigai is the fountain of youth that rejuvenates your body, mind, and soul, and helps you live a long, healthy, and happy life.” – Marc Winn


205. “God, give us grace to accept with serenity the things that cannot be changed, Courage to change the things which should be changed, and the Wisdom to distinguish the one from the other.”


206. “finding flow in the tasks you’ve chosen to do, eating in a balanced and mindful way, doing low-intensity exercise, and learning not to give in when difficulties arise. In order to do this, you have to accept that the world—like the people who live in it—is imperfect, but that it is still full of opportunities for growth and achievement.”


207. “They consume fewer calories: an average of 1,785 per day, compared to 2,068 in the rest of Japan. In fact, low caloric intake is common among the five Blue Zones.”


208. “Only staying active will make you want to live a hundred years. ” — Japanese proverb


209. “The central premise of this stress-reduction method is focusing on the self: noticing our responses, even if they are conditioned by habit, in order to be fully conscious of them. In”


210. “Your ikigai is the ultimate source of happiness, the key to a meaningful and abundant life, and the legacy that you leave behind.” – Neil Pasricha


211. Tea is what you need!


212. The real beauty lies in imperfection


213. “There is nothing wrong with enjoying life’s pleasures as long as they do not take control of your life as you enjoy them. ” — Hector Garcia


214. “Artists know how important it is to protect their space, control their environment, and be free of distractions”


215. “Hara hachi bu,”


216. “No esperes en el sofá a que la inspiración te llegue, tienes que ir tú en busca de la inspiración”


217. “His experiences as a prisoner at Auschwitz showed him that “Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way. ” - ikigai quotes by hector garcia


218. Don’t retire!


219. “Ikigai can be defined as ’a sense of being alive now, an individual’s consciousness as a motive to live. ’” — Aikihiro Hasegawa


220. Get in shape for your next birthday. Water moves; it is at its best when it flows fresh and doesn't stagnate


221. “Estar perdido es bueno. Si no te pierdes, no te puedes encontrar.”


222. “At some point in our conversation, the mysterious word ikigai came up. This Japanese concept, which translates roughly as “the happiness of always being busy,” is like logotherapy, but it goes a step beyond. It also seems to be one way of explaining the extraordinary longevity of the Japanese, especially on the island of Okinawa, where there are 24.55 people over the age of 100 for every 100,000 inhabitants—far more than the global average.”


223. “If you are angry and want to fight, think about it for three days before coming to blows. After three days, the intense desire to fight will pass on its own.”7”


224. “Si usted no tiene una misión en la vida —le respondía el doctor Frankl—, yo le daré una: encontrarla. A partir de ahora su misión será descubrir cuál es su propósito en la vida.”


225. “hara hachi bu. It’s easy to do: When you notice you’re almost full but could have a little more . . . just stop eating!”


226. “It will show you how to leave urgency behind, find your purpose, nurture friendships and throw yourself into your passions.”


227. “Ikigai is the antidote to burnout, stress, and boredom. When you are engaged in work that aligns with your ikigai, you feel energized, fulfilled, and alive.” – Marc Winn


228. “APRENDER, SIEMPRE APRENDER «Podrás hacerte viejo y tembloroso, podrás permanecer despierto de noche escuchando el desorden en tus venas, podrás añorar tu único amor, podrás ver el mundo a tu alrededor devastado por maníacos malvados, o tu honor pisoteado en las cloacas de las mentes simples. Sólo queda una cosa entonces: aprender. Aprender por qué el mundo se mueve y qué lo mueve. Es la única cosa que la mente nunca puede agotar, alienar, ni ser torturada por ello, ni temer ni desconfiar, y ni soñar con lamentarlo.»”


229. “De zondagsneurose, bijvoorbeeld, doet haar opwachting wanneer de doordeweekse verplichtingen en drukte wegvallen en de persoon zijn innerlijke leegte gewaarwordt. Daar moeten dan oplossingen voor worden gezocht. En bovenal een doel, een reden om het bed uit te komen.”


230. “The fruit is extremely acidic: It is impossible to drink shikuwasa juice without diluting it first with water. Its taste is somewhere between that of a lime and a mandarin orange, to which it bears a family resemblance. Shikuwasas also contain high levels of nobiletin, a flavonoid rich in antioxidants.”


231. ‘There is a difference between ikigai and the sense of well being. Ikigai is more concerned with the future: for example, even when one feels that one’s present life is dark, possessing a desire or goal for the future allows one to feel ikigai.’


232. “afrontar tus problemas con valentía logrará sacar lo mejor de ti.”


233. “El resiliente sabe mantenerse centrado en sus objetivos, en lo importante, sin dejarse llevar por el desánimo. Su fuerza procede de la flexibilidad, de saber adaptarse a los cambios y a los golpes del destino. Se centra en los factores sobre los que tiene control sin preocuparse por cosas que no puede controlar.”


234. “fiel a su palabra y siempre hace lo correcto.”


235. “Living your ikigai means embracing your uniqueness, expressing your authentic self, and creating a life that reflects your values and aspirations.” – Shingai Mavima


236. “always keep Morita’s mantra in mind: “What do we need to be doing right now? What action should we be taking?”


237. Do what you’re good at


238. “penultimate town before Cape Hedo, the northernmost point”


239. “Strategy 3: Concentrate on a single task”


240. “This is what Ernest Hemingway meant when he said, “Sometimes I write better than I can.”


241. “Happiness is not something ready-made. It comes from your own actions. ” — Dalai Lama


242. “qigong”


243. “One way to reach a state of mindfulness is through meditation, which helps filter the information that reaches us from the outside world. It can also be achieved through breathing exercises, yoga, and body scans.”


244. “Youthfulness of mind is important in ikigai, but so is commitment and passion, however seemingly insignificant your goal. ” — Ken Mogi


245. ‘Ibasho is the interpersonal side of ikigai that I found important. And it’s about authentic relationship, where you can be who you think you really are. It’s a really philosophical question about who we really are. But it’s also a fact that many of us have this sense that, “this version of me”, whatever you’re doing, whatever you’re feeling, whatever you’re saying, feels right to you. And just be consistent with that. And that’s very important across social relationship.’


246. “Okinawa is one of the areas in Japan that were most affected by World War II. As a result not only of conflicts on the battlefield but also of hunger and a lack of resources once the war ended, the average life expectancy was not very high during the 1940s and 1950s.”


247. “The easiest way to check if there is enough variety on your table is to make sure you’re “eating the rainbow.” A table featuring red peppers, carrots, spinach, cauliflower, and eggplant, for example, offers great color and variety.”


248. “a happy man is too satisfied with the present to dwell on the future.”


249. “Life is pure imperfection, as the philosophy of wabi-sabi teaches us, and the passage of time shows us that everything is fleeting, but if you have a clear sense of your ikigai, each moment will hold so many possibilities that it will seem almost like an eternity.”


250. “We don’t create our feelings; they simply come to us, and we have to accept them.”


251. “Esforzarte y hacerlo lo mejor posible, en cambio, depende de ti.”


252. “Having a clearly defined ikigai brings satisfaction, happiness, and meaning to our lives.”


253. ‘There are many ways to define Ikigai. One way put it is to say that Ikigai is the reason you get up in the morning. It could be something very small like having a cup of coffee and a chocolate. And something that makes your day go on. That is Ikigai.


254. “▪ We don’t create the meaning of our life, as Sartre claimed—we discover it. ▪ We each have a unique reason for being, which can be adjusted or transformed many times over the years. ▪ Just as worry often brings about precisely the thing that was feared, excessive attention to a desire (or “hyper-intention”) can keep that desire from being fulfilled. ▪ Humor can help break negative cycles and reduce anxiety. ▪ We all have the capacity to do noble or terrible things. The side of the equation we end up on depends on our decisions, not on the condition in which we find ourselves.”


255. “Oṃ maṇi padme hūṃ,” in which oṃ is the generosity that purifies the ego, ma is the ethics that purifies jealousy, ṇi is the patience that purifies passion and desire, pad is the precision that purifies bias, me is the surrender that purifies greed, and hūṃ is the wisdom that purifies hatred.”


256. “Metabolism slows down 90 percent after 30 minutes of sitting. The enzymes that move the bad fat from your arteries to your muscles, where it can get burned off, slow down. And after two hours, good cholesterol drops 20 percent. Just getting up for five minutes is going to get things going again. These things are so simple they’re almost stupid,” says Gavin Bradley1 in a 2015 interview with Brigid Schulte for the Washington Post.2 Bradley is one of the preeminent experts on the subject, and the director of an international organization dedicated to building awareness of how detrimental sitting all the time can be to our health.”


257. “Información”


258. “Don’t look at any kind of screen for the first hour you’re awake and the last hour before you go to sleep. ▪ Turn off your phone before you achieve flow. There is nothing more important than the task you have chosen to do during this time. If this seems too extreme, enable the “do not disturb” function so only the people closest to you can contact you in case of emergency. ▪ Designate one day of the week, perhaps a Saturday or Sunday, a day of technological “fasting,” making exceptions only for e-readers (without Wi-Fi) or MP3 players. ▪ Go to a café that doesn’t have Wi-Fi. ▪ Read and respond to e-mail only once or twice per day. Define those times clearly and stick to them. ▪ Try the Pomodoro Technique: Get yourself a kitchen timer (some are made to look like a pomodoro, or tomato) and commit to working on a single task as long as it’s running. The Pomodoro Technique recommends 25 minutes of work and 5 minutes of rest for each cycle, but you can also do 50 minutes of work and 10 minutes of rest. Find the pace that’s best for”


259. “Hello, solitude. How are you today? Come, sit with me, and I will care for you.”


260. “Con el tiempo, sin embargo, echas la mirada atrás y te das cuenta de que la travesía del desierto, por dura que fuera, nos trajo justamente lo que necesitábamos aprender para el siguiente paso. Por eso nunca hay que menospreciar los caminos que parecen no conducir a ningún sitio.”


261. “Happiness is in the doing, not in the result. As a rule of thumb, remind yourself: “Rituals over goals.”


262. “those who face challenges with a positive outlook and are able to manage their emotions are already well on their way toward longevity.”


263. ” People who isolate themselves can’t have ikigai – meaning or purpose. Meaning and purpose are only found in interpersonal relationships. ” — Tatsuzō Ishikawa


264. “25 minutes of work and 5 minutes of rest for each cycle,”


265. “aceptar con buen ánimo el rechazo, ya que no todo el mundo te comprenderá; • buscar personas que crean en ti; • aprovechar las oportunidades que se presenten.”


266. “Don’t look at any kind of screen for the first hour you’re awake and the last hour before you go to sleep. ▪ Turn off your phone before you achieve flow. There is nothing more important than the task you have chosen to do during this time. If this seems too extreme, enable the “do not disturb” function so only the people closest to you can contact you in case of emergency. ▪ Designate one day of the week, perhaps a Saturday or Sunday, a day of technological “fasting,” making exceptions only for e-readers (without Wi-Fi) or MP3 players. ▪ Go to a café that doesn’t have Wi-Fi. ▪ Read and respond to e-mail only once or twice per day. Define those times clearly and stick to them.”


267. “Little things that add up to a long and happy life”


268. “As soon as you take those first small steps, your anxiety will disappear, and you will achieve a pleasant flow in the activity you’re doing. ” — Hector Garcia


269. “My secret to a long life is always saying to myself, ‘Slow down,’ and ‘Relax.’ You live much longer if you’re not in a hurry.”


270. “One of the most common mistakes among people starting to meditate is worrying about doing it “right,” achieving absolute mental silence, or reaching “nirvana.” The most important thing is to focus on the journey.”


271. “you have to accept that the world—like the people who live in it—is imperfect, but that it is still full of opportunities for growth and achievement.”


272. “ayuda de los demás es necesaria para llevar a cabo todos los grandes proyectos.”


273. “Logotherapy does not see this frustration as mental illness, the way other forms of therapy do, but rather as spiritual anguish—a natural and beneficial phenomenon that drives those who suffer from it to seek a cure, whether on their own or with the help of others, and in so doing to find greater satisfaction in life. It helps them change their own destiny.”


274. “sushi every day for more than eighty years, and owns a small sushi restaurant near the Ginza subway station in Tokyo.”


275. “What have I received from person X? What have I given to person X? What problems have I caused person X?”


276. “Strategy 2: Have a clear, concrete objective”


277. “«El hombre es afectado no por los eventos, sino por la forma en que los considera», decía Epicteto.”


278. “We often think that combining tasks will save us time, but scientific evidence shows that it has the opposite effect. Even those who claim to be good at multitasking are not very productive. ” — Hector Garcia


279. “If you can make the process of making the effort your primary source of happiness, then you have succeeded in the most important challenge of your life. ” — Ken Mogi


280. “The 80 percent secret One of the most common sayings in Japan is “Hara hachi bu,” which is repeated before or after eating and means something like “Fill your belly to 80 percent.”


281. “Researchers at the Heidelberg University Hospital conducted a study in which they subjected a young doctor to a job interview, which they made even more stressful by forcing him to solve complex math problems for thirty minutes. Afterward, they took a blood sample. What they discovered was that his antibodies had reacted to stress the same way they react to pathogens, activating the proteins that trigger an immune response. The problem is that this response not only neutralizes harmful agents, it also damages healthy cells, leading them to age prematurely.”


282. “We have to learn to turn off the autopilot that’s steering us in an endless loop. We all know people who snack while talking on the phone or watching the news. You ask them if the omelet they just ate had onion in it, and they can’t tell you.”


283. “people who live the longest have two dispositional traits in common: a positive attitude and a high degree of emotional awareness.”


284. Take it slow: "walk slowly and you'll go far


285. Stay active; don't retire


286. “Stress: Accused of killing longevity”


287. “Morita likened emotions to the weather: We can’t predict or control them; we can only observe them.”


288. “We should never forget that everything we have and all the people we love will disappear at some point. This is something we should keep in mind, but without giving in to pessimism. Being aware of the impermanence of things does not have to make us sad; it should help us love the present moment and those who surround us.”


289. “Hello, solitude. How are you today? Come, sit with me, and I will care for you.”6”


290. “True silence is the rest of the mind, and is to the spirit what sleep is to the body, nourishment, and refreshment. ” — William Penn


291. “mens sana in corpore sano”


292. “That resilience is also this ability to bounce back from difficulties. And for those who live with ikigai can appreciate and find meaning in life’s difficulties. ” — Dr. Yasuhiro Kotera


293. “Take it slow. Being in a hurry is inversely proportional to quality of life. As the old saying goes, “Walk slowly and you’ll go far.” When we leave urgency behind, life and time take on new meaning.”


294. “Los budistas tienen una fórmula para la felicidad que va en sentido contrario: FELICIDAD = REALIDAD – DESEOS”


295. “This brings us back to the 80 percent rule we mentioned in the first chapter, a concept known in Japanese as hara hachi bu. It’s easy to do: When you notice you’re almost full but could have a little more . . . just stop eating!”


296. “Artists know how important it is to protect their space, control their environment, and be free of distractions.”


297. The purpose of our lives is to be happy


298. “Life is not a problem to be solved. Just remember to have something that keeps you busy doing what you love while being surrounded by the people who love you.”


299. “«Entonces, ¿usted por qué sigue viviendo?».”


300. “Instead of worrying about the past or the future, we should appreciate things just as they are in the moment, in the now.”


301. “Case study: The grief-stricken doctor An elderly doctor, unable to overcome the deep depression into which he’d fallen after the death of his wife two years earlier, went to Frankl for help. Instead of giving him advice or analyzing his condition, Frankl asked him what would have happened if he had been the one who died first. The doctor, horrified, answered that it would have been terrible for his poor wife, that she would have suffered tremendously. To which Frankl responded, “You see, doctor? You have spared her all that suffering, but the price you have to pay for this is to survive, and mourn her.” The doctor didn’t say another word. He left Frankl’s office in peace, after taking the therapist’s hand in his own. He was able to tolerate the pain in place of his beloved wife. His life had been given a purpose.”


302. Because the right path will not always be the easiest


303. “Fight for yourself”


304. “Fuerza”


305. “Focus on enjoying your daily rituals, using them as tools to enter a state of flow. Don’t worry about the outcome—it will come naturally. Happiness is in the doing, not in the result. As a rule of thumb, remind yourself: “Rituals over goals.”


306. “ichariba chode, a local expression that means “treat everyone like a brother, even if you’ve never met them before.” It turns out that one of the secrets to happiness of Ogimi’s residents is feeling like part of a community. From an early age they practice yuimaaru, or teamwork, and so are used to helping one another. Nurturing friendships, eating light, getting enough rest, and doing regular, moderate exercise are all part of the equation of good health, but at the heart of the joie de vivre that inspires these centenarians to keep celebrating birthdays and cherishing each new day is their ikigai. The purpose of this book is to bring the secrets of Japan’s centenarians to you and give you the tools to find your own ikigai. Because those who discover their ikigai have everything they need for a long and joyful journey through life. Happy travels! Héctor García and Francesc Miralles”


307. Reconnect with nature


308. “Even after receiving a three-star rating from Michelin, they never considered opening other locations or expanding the business. They serve just ten patrons at a time at the bar of their small restaurant. Jiro’s family isn’t looking to make money; instead they value good working conditions and creating an environment in which they can flow while making the best sushi in the world.”


309. “Once you discover your ikigai, pursuing it and nurturing it every day will bring meaning to your life. ” — Francesc Miralles


310. “Repitiendo la operación, envíala por correo. 5. Al recibir esta segunda carta en casa, léela con atención y ten muy presente todo lo que se dice ella. Es una lección de vida del mejor maestro del mundo: tú mismo.”


311. “One way to reach a state of mindfulness is through meditation, which helps filter the information that reaches us from the outside world. It can also be achieved through breathing exercises, yoga, and body scans. ” - ikigai quotes by hector garcia


312. “The ten rules of ikigai We’ll conclude this journey with ten rules we’ve distilled from the wisdom of the long-living residents of Ogimi: 1. Stay active; don’t retire. Those who give up the things they love doing and do well lose their purpose in life. That’s why it’s so important to keep doing things of value, making progress, bringing beauty or utility to others, helping out, and shaping the world around you, even after your “official” professional activity has ended. 2. Take it slow. Being in a hurry is inversely proportional to quality of life. As the old saying goes, “Walk slowly and you’ll go far.” When we leave urgency behind, life and time take on new meaning. 3. Don’t fill your stomach. Less is more when it comes to eating for long life, too. According to the 80 percent rule, in order to stay healthier longer, we should eat a little less than our hunger demands instead of stuffing ourselves. 4. Surround yourself with good friends. Friends are the best medicine, there for confiding worries over a good chat, sharing stories that brighten your day, getting advice, having fun, dreaming … in other words, living. 5. Get in shape for your next birthday. Water moves; it is at its best when it flows fresh and doesn’t stagnate. The body you move through life in needs a bit of daily maintenance to keep it running for a long time. Plus, exercise releases hormones that make us feel happy. 6. Smile. A cheerful attitude is not only relaxing—it also helps make friends. It’s good to recognize the things that aren’t so great, but we should never forget what a privilege it is to be in the here and now in a world so full of possibilities. 7. Reconnect with nature. Though most people live in cities these days, human beings are made to be part of the natural world. We should return to it often to recharge our batteries. 8. Give thanks. To your ancestors, to nature, which provides you with the air you breathe and the food you eat, to your friends and family, to everything that brightens your days and makes you feel lucky to be alive. Spend a moment every day giving thanks, and you’ll watch your stockpile of happiness grow. 9. Live in the moment. Stop regretting the past and fearing the future. Today is all you have. Make the most of it. Make it worth remembering. 10. Follow your ikigai. There is a passion inside you, a unique talent that gives meaning to your days and drives you to share the best of yourself until the very end. If you don’t know what your ikigai is yet, as Viktor Frankl says, your mission is to discover it.”


313. “APRENDER, SIEMPRE APRENDER «Podrás hacerte viejo y tembloroso, podrás permanecer despierto de noche escuchando el desorden en tus venas, podrás añorar tu único amor, podrás ver el mundo a tu alrededor devastado por maníacos malvados, o tu honor pisoteado en las cloacas de las mentes simples. Sólo queda una cosa entonces: aprender. Aprender por qué el mundo se mueve y qué lo mueve. Es la única cosa que la mente nunca puede agotar, alienar, ni ser torturada por ello, ni temer ni desconfiar, y ni soñar con lamentarlo.» T. H. White, El único y futuro rey”


314. Live in the moment. Stop regretting the past and fearing the future


315. “As Csikszentmihalyi asserts in his book Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience, flow is “the state in which people are so involved in an activity that nothing else seems to matter; the experience itself is so enjoyable that people will do it even at great cost, for the sheer sake of doing it.”


316. “Strategy 1: Choose a difficult task (but not too difficult!)”


317. “prática da atenção plena (mindfulness).”


318. “simply interacting with others—playing a game, for example—offers new stimuli and helps prevent the depression that can come with solitude. ”


319. “Our ikigai is different for all of us, but one thing we have in common is that we are all searching for meaning. ”


320. “When we say we’re multitasking, what we’re really doing is switching back and forth between tasks very quickly. Unfortunately, we’re not computers adept at parallel processing. We end up spending all our energy alternating between tasks, instead of focusing on doing one of them well.”


321. “Only things that are imperfect, incomplete, and ephemeral can truly be beautiful because only those things resemble the natural world. ” — Hector Garcia


322. “We have to learn to turn off the autopilot that’s steering us in an endless loop. We all know people who snack while talking on the phone or watching the news. You ask them if the omelet they just ate had onion in it, and they can’t tell you,” - ikigai quotes by hector garcia


323. “Experts point out that, for one thing, Okinawa is the only province in Japan without trains. Its residents have to walk or cycle when not driving. It is also the only province that has managed to follow the Japanese government’s recommendation of eating less than ten grams of salt per day.”


324. “What have I received from person X? 2. What have I given to person X? 3. What problems have I caused person X?”


325. “We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit.”


326. ‘What makes life worth living?… It is ikigai, I’ve maintained, one’s deepest sense of social commitment, most often to one’s dream, family, work or religious belief. My argument has been that selves seek, through ikigai, a sense of their social significance and, beyond that, hints if not assurances of their transcendent significance, linking their own meanings to the meanings of life.’


327. “Morita therapy focuses on teaching patients to accept their emotions without trying to control them, since their feelings will change as a result of their actions.”


328. “In an increasingly unpredictable world moving ever more quickly, a detailed map may lead you deep into the woods at an unnecessarily high cost. A good compass, though, will always take you where you need to go. It doesn’t mean that you should start your journey without any idea where you’re going. What it does mean is understanding that while the path to your goal may not be straight, you’ll finish faster and more efficiently than you would have if you had trudged along a preplanned route.”


329. “Modification of brain waves Improved balance of sex hormones Lower mortality rate from heart attacks Lower blood pressure in patients with hypertension Greater bone density Better circulation Deceleration of symptoms associated with senility Greater balance and efficiency of bodily functions”


330. “para ti lo estable es el cambio».”


331. “essentials to happiness in this life are something to do, something to love, and something to hope for.”


332. “Keep going; don’t change your path.” そのままでいいがな”


333. “Stress has a degenerative effect over time. A sustained state of emergency affects the neurons associated with memory, as well as inhibiting the release of certain hormones, the absence of which can cause depression. Its secondary effects include irritability, insomnia, anxiety, and high blood pressure.”


334. “Debes prepararte para los desafíos que se avecinan.”


335. “When confronted with a big goal, try to break it down into parts and then attack each part one by one. ”


336. “The purpose of life is not to be in the majority but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane. ” — Marcus Aurelius


337. “Being in a hurry is inversely proportional to quality of”


338. “Defalarca ne yapıyorsak oyuz. Bu yüzden mükemmellik bir eylem değil, bir alışkanlıktır.” (Aristoteles)”


339. “centenarians”


340. “In feelings, it is best to be wealthy and generous.”


341. “study conducted by Frankl in his Vienna clinic found that among both patients and personnel, around 80 percent believed that human beings needed a reason for living, and around 60 percent felt they had someone or something in their lives worth dying for.2”


342. “One easy way to start applying the concept of hara hachi bu is to skip dessert. Or to reduce portion size. The idea is to still be a little bit hungry when you finish.”


343. Create your own happiness


344. “Dealing with new situations, learning something new every day, playing games, and interacting with other people seem to be essential anti-aging strategies for the mind. Furthermore, a more positive outlook in this regard will yield greater mental benefits.”


345. “It is this sense of purpose, of living in a moment, that makes you feel alive. That’s what I think ikigai is about. ” — Yohei Nakajima


346. “He who has a why to live for can bear with almost any how. ” — Hector Garcia


347. “concreta qué quieres conseguir exactamente. Apunta bien y… ¡acertarás!”


348. “Ikigai is the reason why you get up in the morning, the thing that motivates you to keep going, and the passion that fuels your soul.” – Francesc Miralles


349. “Keep going; don’t change your path. ” — Hector Garcia


350. “Hara hachi bu,” which is repeated before or after eating and means something like “Fill your belly to 80 percent.”


351. “then decide we can’t live without a sailboat. We finally win the heart of the man or woman we’ve been pining for and suddenly find we have a wandering eye. People can be insatiable. The Stoics believed that these kinds of desires and ambitions are not worth pursuing. The objective of the virtuous person is to reach a state of tranquility (apatheia): the absence of negative feelings such as anxiety, fear, shame, vanity, and anger, and the presence of positive feelings such as happiness, love, serenity, and gratitude. In order to keep their minds virtuous, the Stoics practiced something like negative visualization: They imagined the worst thing that could happen in order to be prepared if certain privileges and pleasures were taken from them. To practice negative visualization, we have to reflect on negative events, but without worrying about them.”


352. “Grains are the foundation of their diet. Japanese people eat white rice every day, sometimes adding noodles. Rice is the primary food in Okinawa, as well.”


353. “charged up” and allows us to face challenges.”


354. “Do what you should be doing.”


355. ‘Some people say,”My work is my ikigai”. But these people are confusing hatarakigai [the sense that one’s work is worth doing] with ikigai [the sense that one’s life is worth living]. Some people hold that gētobōru [“gateball,” croquet, the stereotypical pastime of old people in Japan] or raising chrysanthemums, or writing haiku is their ikigai; but that’s just asobigai [play that is worth doing], not ikigai [the sense that one’s life is worth living]. Real ikigai is more than that… People can feel real ikigai only when, on the basis of personal maturity, the satisfaction of various desires, love and happiness, encounters with others, and a sense of value of life, they proceed towards self-realisation.’


356. “Sevdiğiniz bir yamaçtan aşağıya kaydığınızı hayal edin. Kar, beyaz kum gibi iki yanınızda uçuşuyor.”


357. More ikigai (activities). Less ikigai (activities)


358. “It is much more important to have a compass pointing to a concrete objective than to have a map. Joi Ito, director of the MIT Media Lab, encourages us to use the principle of “compass over maps” as a tool to navigate our world of uncertainty. In the book Whiplash: How to Survive Our Faster Future, he and Jeff Howe write, “In an increasingly unpredictable world moving ever more quickly, a detailed map may lead you deep into the woods at an unnecessarily high cost. A good compass, though, will always take you where you need to go. It doesn’t mean that you should start your journey without any idea where you’re going. What it does mean is understanding that while the path to your goal may not be straight, you’ll finish faster and more efficiently than you would have if you had trudged along a preplanned route.”


359. “Instead of having a single salary, try to find a way to make money from your hobbies, at other jobs, or by starting your own business. If you have only one salary, you might be left with nothing should your employer run into trouble, leaving you in a position of fragility. On the other hand, if you have several options and you lose your primary job, it might just happen that you end up dedicating more time to your secondary job, and maybe even make more money at it. You would have beaten that stroke of bad luck and would be, in that case, antifragile.”


360. “Por eso nunca hay que menospreciar los caminos que parecen no conducir a ningún sitio.”


361. “Morita explained the idea of letting go of negative feelings with the following fable: A donkey that is tied to a post by a rope will keep walking around the post in an attempt to free itself, only to become more immobilized and attached to the post. The same thing applies to people with obsessive thinking who become more trapped in their own suffering when they try to escape from their fears and discomfort.“


362. “A moai is an informal group of people with common interests who look out for one another. For many, serving the community becomes part of their ikigai. The moai has its origins in hard times, when farmers would get together to share best practices and help one another cope with meager harvests. Members of a moai make a set monthly contribution to the group. This payment allows them to participate in meetings, dinners, games of go and shogi (Japanese chess), or whatever hobby they have in common.”


363. “Sunday neurosis, for example, is what happens when, without the obligations and commitments of the workweek, the individual realizes how empty he is inside.”


364. “Happiness is always determined by your heart.”


365. Fixed


366. “Ikigai is the recipe for a fulfilling life, the formula for a successful career, and the blueprint for a happy and healthy existence.” – Marc Winn


367. “one’s”


368. “Logotherapy pushes patients to consciously discover their life’s purpose in order to confront their neuroses. Their quest to fulfill their destiny then motivates them to press forward, breaking the mental chains of the past and overcoming whatever obstacles they encounter along the way.”


369. “What do Japanese artisans, engineers, Zen philosophy, and cuisine have in common? Simplicity and attention to detail.”


370. “When we say we’re multitasking, what we’re really doing is switching back and forth between tasks very quickly. Unfortunately, we’re not computers adept at parallel processing. We end up spending all our energy alternating between tasks, instead of focusing on doing one of them well. Concentrating on one thing at a time may be the single most important factor in achieving flow.”


371. “Money does not buy you happiness, but lack of money certainly buys you misery.”


372. SPORTS. FEATURED


373. Because only present moments are in your hand


374. “Your ikigai is like a compass that guides you towards the path of your dreams, the journey that you were meant to take.” – Francesc Miralles


375. “Stoicism, which centers on the idea that there is nothing wrong with enjoying life’s pleasures as long as they do not take control of your life as you enjoy them. You have to be prepared for those pleasures to disappear.”


376. “Just as worry often brings about precisely the thing that was feared, excessive attention to a desire (or “hyper-intention”) can keep that desire from being fulfilled.”


377. “One way to reach a state of mindfulness is through meditation, which helps filter the information that reaches us from the outside world. ” — Hector Garcia


378. “Cuando te llegue a casa, imagina que no eres tú quién la ha escrito, sino un amigo lejano que necesita tus consejos. Tú eres el maestro, así que escribirás una nueva carta para dar respuesta a todo lo que plantea la que has recibido.”


379. “9. Rebeldía”


380. “If we try to get rid of one wave with another, we end up with an infinite sea.”


381. “Yoga—originally from India, though very popular in Japan—and China’s qigong and tai chi, among other disciplines, seek to create harmony between a person’s body and mind so they can face the world with strength, joy, and serenity.”


382. “El enemigo es el miedo, la armadura es el amor.”


383. “In Japanese, ikigai is written as 生き甲斐, combining 生き, which means “life,” with 甲斐, which means “to be worthwhile.” 甲斐 can be broken down into the characters 甲, which means “armor,” “number one,” and “to be the first” (to head into battle, taking initiative as a leader), and 斐, which means “beautiful” or “elegant.”


384. “Only things that are imperfect, incomplete, and ephemeral can truly be beautiful, because only those things resemble the natural world.”


385. “Determinación”


386. “ichi-go ichi-e,”


387. “fuerza de espíritu, ese es el verdadero superpoder.”


388. “The key is to accept that there are certain things over which we have no control, like the passage of time and the ephemeral nature of the world around us.”


389. “felicidad siempre la decide tu corazón».”


390. Follow your ikigai. If you don't know what your ikigai is yet, your mission is to discover it


391. “Duygularımızı biz yaratmayız, onlar bize gelirler ve onları kabul etmek zorundayız. İşin püf noktası onları hoş karşılamaktır. Morita duyguları havaya benzetir: onları öngöremez ya da kontrol edemeyiz onları sadece gözlemleyebiliriz.”


392. Surround yourself with good friends. Friends are the best medicine


393. “What motivates a person is a sense of meaning. A clearly defined, even uniquely determined role in life brings about life satisfaction.”


394. “expectancy”


395. “La lista puede ser todo lo larga que tú quieras. De hecho, es bueno que tenga muchos NO, ya que con cada posibilidad que eliminas, estás un poco más cerca de saber lo que sí te gusta.”


396. “Your ikigai is where your talent, passion, mission, and profession intersect to create a fulfilling and meaningful life.” – Marc Winn


397. “«una persona feliz está demasiado satisfecha con el presente como para pensar en el futuro».”


398. “We’re talking about resilience, a concept that has become influential among psychologists. But resilience isn’t just the ability to persevere. As we’ll see in this chapter, it is also an outlook we can cultivate to stay focused on the important things in life rather than what is most urgent, and to keep ourselves from being carried away by negative emotions.”


399. “Be led by your curiosity, and keep busy by doing things that fill you with meaning and happiness.”


400. “Presented with new information, the brain creates new connections and is revitalized. This is why it is so important to expose yourself to change, even if stepping outside your comfort zone means feeling a bit of anxiety.”


401. “Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”


402. “Ikigai is more concerned with the future: for example, even when one feels that one’s present life is dark, possessing a desire or goal for the future allows one to feel ikigai. ” — Noriyuki Nakanishi


403. “As a rule of thumb, remind yourself: “Rituals over goals.” The happiest people are not the ones who achieve the most. They are the ones who spend more time than others in a state of flow.”


404. “Antifragility is beyond resilience or robustness. The resilient resists shocks and stays the same; the antifragile gets better.”


405. “ikigai brings you focus and direction, and serves as an anchor in your life. With ikigai in mind, you will not have to think twice about what matters to you, and hence you will know what to prioritize. We are bombarded with endless decisions to be made day after day, but knowing your ikigai will eliminate your insecurities about your decisions and allow you to make better ones. Your will find that simple decisions, like how you spend your time, will automatically be made for you when you know your ikigai.”


406. “Ikigai is the perfect balance between doing what you love, what you’re good at, what the world needs, and what you can be rewarded for.” – Marc Winn


407. “Carmen Herrera, pintora de 100 años, vendió su primera pintura a los 89 años. Hoy sus obras están en la colección permanente del Museo de Arte Moderno y el Tate Modern. Cuando la periodista le preguntó cómo veía su futuro a los 99 años, declaró: «Mi motivación es terminar el siguiente proyecto. Voy día a día».”


408. INDIA. BIZ & TECH


409. “There is nothing more for humans to live life fully than ikigai. Therefore, there is no cruelty greater than to deprive humans of their ikigai. ” — Mieko Kamiya


410. “finding flow in a “ritualistic workplace” is much easier than in one in which we are continually stressed out trying to achieve unclear goals set by our bosses”


411. “Getting back to Albert Einstein, “a happy man is too satisfied with the present to dwell on the future.”4”


412. “You can only live one day at a time, and no one can be certain that they will wake up the next morning. So let’s not postpone happiness; the best moment in your life is always this one. ” — Garcia and Miralles (2019, pg 60)


413. Heavy duty protection


414. “simply interacting with others—playing a game, for example—offers new stimuli and helps prevent the depression that can come with solitude.”


415. “Okinawans eat fish an average of three times per week; unlike in other parts of Japan, the most frequently consumed meat is pork, though locals eat it only once or twice per week.”


416. “To refer to the kind of power possessed by the Hydra of Lerna, to talk about things that get stronger when they are harmed, Taleb proposes the term antifragile: “Antifragility is beyond resilience or robustness. The resilient resists shocks and stays the same; the antifragile gets better.”


417. “Ikigai is the art of living in the present moment, appreciating the beauty of life, and savoring the small pleasures that make it worth living.” – Hector Garcia Puigcerver


418. “Accept your feelings.”


419. “Their blood tests reveal fewer free radicals (which are responsible for cellular aging), as a result of drinking tea and eating until their stomachs are only 80 percent full. ▪”


420. “Es como un motor interior, una ilusión, que te impulsa a empezar la jornada.”


421. “Meditation generates alpha and theta brain waves. For those experienced in meditation, these waves appear right away, while it might take a half hour for a beginner to experience them. These relaxing brain waves are the ones that are activated right before we fall asleep, as we lie in the sun, or right after taking a hot bath.”


422. Do what you love


423. “Metabolism slows down 90 percent after 30 minutes of sitting. The enzymes that move the bad fat from your arteries to your muscles, where it can get burned off, slow down. And after two hours, good cholesterol drops 20 percent. Just getting up for five minutes is going to get things going again.”


424. “There is, in fact, no word in Japanese that means retire in the sense of “leaving the workforce for good”


425. “There is a difference between ikigai and the sense of well being. Ikigai is more concerned with the future: for example, even when one feels that one’s present life is dark, possessing a desire or goal for the future allows one to feel ikigai.”


426. “In other words, ikigai can be about the joy a person finds living day-to-day, without which their life as a whole would not be a happy one. ” — Akihiro Hasegawa


427. “Japanse Spreuk: als je zeven keer valt, sta je acht keer op”


428. “Getting back to Albert Einstein, “a happy man is too satisfied with the present to dwell on the future.”


429. “Ichi-go ichi-e teaches us to focus on the present and enjoy each moment that life brings us. This is why it is so important to find and pursue our ikigai.”


430. “Whatever you do, don’t retire!”


431. “As soon as you take these first small steps, your anxiety will disappear and you will achieve a pleasant flow in the activity you’re doing.”


432. “Training the mind can get us to a place of flow more quickly. Meditation is one way to exercise our mental muscles.”


433. Lonczak, Ph. D


434. “The mortality rate from cardiovascular disease in Okinawa is the lowest in Japan, and diet almost certainly has a lot to do with this. It is no coincidence that the “Okinawa Diet” is so often discussed around the world at panels on nutrition.”


435. “Nana korobi ya oki 七転び八起き


436. “Stop regretting the past and fearing the future. Today is all you have. ” — Hector Garcia


437. “La única situación en la que no se tienen problemas ni incertidumbres se da cuando estás muerto.”


438. “Honor”


439. “Si te equivocas, admítelo con franqueza y prueba otra cosa. Pero, sobre todo, sigue intentándolo.”


440. “you; the most important thing is to be disciplined in completing each cycle. ▪ Start your work session with a ritual you enjoy and end it with a reward. ▪ Train your mind to return to the present when you find yourself getting distracted. Practice mindfulness or another form of meditation, go for a walk or a swim—whatever will help you get centered again. ▪ Work in a space where you will not be distracted. If you can’t do this at home, go to a library, a café, or, if your task involves playing the saxophone, a music studio. If you find that your surroundings continue to distract you, keep looking until you find the right place. ▪ Divide each activity into groups of related tasks, and assign each group its own place and time. For example, if you’re writing a magazine article, you could do research and take notes at home in the morning, write in the library in the afternoon, and edit on the couch at night. ▪ Bundle routine tasks—such as sending out invoices, making phone calls, and so on—and do them all at once.”


441. “Okinawans live by the principle of ichariba chode, a local expression that means “treat everyone like a brother, even if you’ve never met them before.” It turns out that one of the secrets to happiness of Ogimi’s residents is feeling like part of a community.”


442. “A complementary Japanese concept is that of ichi-go ichi-e, which could be translated as “This moment exists only now and won’t come again.”


443. “One of the most commonly used mantras in Buddhism focuses on controlling negative emotions: “Oṃ maṇi padme hūṃ,” in which oṃ is the generosity that purifies the ego, ma is the ethics that purifies jealousy, ṇi is the patience that purifies passion and desire, pad is the precision that purifies bias, me is the surrender that purifies greed, and hūṃ is the wisdom that purifies hatred.”


444. “If a man has no tea in him, he is incapable of understanding truth and beauty. ” — Japanese proverb


445. “Our ikigai is different for all of us, but one thing we have in common is that we are all searching for meaning.”


446. “Your vision will only become clear when you look inside your heart. Who looks outside dreams, who looks inside awakens”


447. “If one sees the meaning, or intrinsic nature of experience, more like ikigai, they can appreciate that change. ” — Yasuhiro Kotera


448. “As Csikszentmihalyi would say, the key is always having a meaningful challenge to overcome in order to maintain flow.”


449. “Unidad”


450. “no aceptan las injusticias ni las limitaciones.”


451. “treat everyone like a brother, even if you’ve never met them before.”


452. “Ikigai translated into English as ‘life purpose’ sounds quite formidable, but ikigai need not be the one overriding purpose of a person’s life. In fact, the word life aligns more with daily life. In other words, ikigai can be about the joy a person finds living day-to-day, without which their life as a whole would not be a happy one.”


453. “Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit. —Aristotle”


454. “White tea, with its high concentration of polyphenols, may be even more effective against aging. In fact, it is considered to be the natural product with the greatest antioxidant power in the world—to the extent that one cup of white tea might pack the same punch as about a dozen glasses of orange juice.”


455. Do it with passion or don’t do it at all


456. “Locals eat a wide variety of foods, especially vegetables. Variety seems to be key. A study of Okinawa’s centenarians showed that they ate 206 different foods, including spices, on a regular basis. They ate an average of eighteen different foods each day, a striking contrast to the nutritional poverty of our fast-food culture.”


457. ‘Ikigai translated into English as ‘life purpose’ sounds quite formidable, but ikigai need not be the one overriding purpose of a person’s life. In fact, the word life aligns more with daily life. In other words, ikigai can be about the joy a person finds living day-to-day, without which their life as a whole would not be a happy one.’


458. “es necesario invertir al menos diez mil horas en algo para llegar a ser un maestro.”


459. “To be able to concentrate for a considerable amount of time is essential to difficult achievement”


460. Don't fill your stomach. Less is more when it comes to eating for a long life


461. “If you look the right way, you can see that the whole world is a garden. ” — Frances Hodgson Burnett


462. “De esa forma, al introducir nueva información, el cerebro crea conexiones nuevas y se revitaliza. Por ello es importante exponerse al cambio aunque aumente el nivel de ansiedad al salir de la zona de confort.”


463. ikigai inspiring quotes gift store motif graphic d


464. “Morita explained the idea of letting go of negative feelings with the following fable: A donkey that is tied to a post by a rope will keep walking around the post in an attempt to free itself, only to become more immobilized and attached to the post. The same thing applies to people with obsessive thinking who become more trapped in their own suffering when they try to escape from their fears and discomfort. ” - ikgiai quotes bud hector garcia


465. “My ikigai is to live, or aspire to live, in a beautiful world. 'Beautiful' can mean many things, including comfort and harmony, as well as something looking or feeling beautiful.”


466. “The happiest people are not the ones who achieve the most. They are the ones who spend more time than others in a state of flow. ”


467. “We have to learn to turn off the autopilot that’s steering us in an endless loop. We all know people who snack while talking on the phone or watching the news. You ask them if the omelet they just ate had onion in it, and they can’t tell you,”


468. “Many centenarians and supercentenarians have similar profiles: They have had full lives that were difficult at times, but they knew how to approach these challenges with a positive attitude and not be overwhelmed by the obstacles they faced.”


469. “Can someone really retire if he is passionate about what he does?”


470. Please don't forget to be kind to yourself and others 🤗 we're all in this together. 💖


471. Give thanks. To your ancestors, to nature. . . to your friends and family


472. “Because they are rich in antioxidants and are eaten nearly every day in the region, these fifteen foods are considered keys to Okinawan vitality: Tofu Miso Tuna Carrots Goya (bitter melon) Kombu (sea kelp) Cabbage Nori (seaweed) Onion Soy sprouts Hechima (cucumber-like gourd) Soybeans (boiled or raw) Sweet potato Peppers Sanpin-cha (jasmine tea)”


473. “For all these reasons, melatonin is a great ally in preserving youth. It should be noted, however, that melatonin production decreases after age thirty. We can compensate for this by: ▪ Eating a balanced diet and getting more calcium. ▪ Soaking up a moderate amount of sun each day. ▪ Getting enough sleep. ▪ Avoiding stress, alcohol, tobacco, and caffeine, all of which make it harder to get a good night’s rest, depriving us of the melatonin we need.”


474. “Ikigai is not a destination, it’s a journey. Finding your ikigai is about discovering what brings you joy, fulfilment, and purpose.” – Hector Garcia Puigcerver


475. “Porque la suerte no depende de ti, sino del azar.”


476. “In spring, breathe xu for clear eyes and so wood can aid your liver. In summer, reach for he, so that heart and fire can be at peace. In fall, breathe si to stabilize and gather metal, keeping the lungs moist. For the kidneys, next, breathe chui and see your inner waters calm. The Triple Heater needs your xi to expel all heat and troubles. In all four seasons, take deep breaths so your spleen can process food. And, of course, avoid exhaling noisily; don’t let even your own ears hear you. The practice is most excellent and will help preserve your divine elixir.”


477. “Maximum Brainpower: Challenging the Brain for Health and Wisdom”


478. “All citrus fruits—grapefruits, oranges, lemons—are high in nobiletin, but Okinawa’s shikuwasas have forty times as much as oranges. Consuming nobiletin has been proven to protect us from arteriosclerosis, cancer, type 2 diabetes, and obesity in general. Shikuwasas also contain vitamins C and B1, beta carotene, and minerals. They are used in many traditional dishes and to add flavor to food, and are squeezed to make juice. While conducting research at the birthday parties of the town’s “grandparents,” we were served shikuwasa cake.”


479. “Be water, my friend.”


480. “If you are angry and want to fight, think about it for three days before coming to blows. After three days, the intense desire to fight will pass on its own.”


481. “There is much wisdom in the classic saying “mens sana in corpore sano” (“a sound mind in a sound body”): It reminds us that both mind and body are important, and that the health of one is connected to that of the other. It has been shown that maintaining an active, adaptable mind is one of the key factors in staying young.”


482. “hay cosas que no salen a la primera;”


483. “Einstein goes, “Put your hand on a hot stove for a minute and it seems like an hour. Sit with a pretty girl for an hour, and it seems”


484. “There is nothing wrong with enjoying life’s pleasures as long as they do not take control of your life as you enjoy them”


485. “Be led by your curiosity, and keep busy by doing things that fill you with meaning and happiness. ” — Hector Garcia


486. “we tend to believe that what we think influences how we feel, which in turn influences how we act. In contrast, Morita therapy focuses on teaching patients to accept their emotions without trying to control them, since their feelings will change as a result of their actions.”


487. “It doesn’t need to be a big thing: we might find meaning in being good parents or in helping our neighbors.”


488. “The best way to predict the future is to create it. ” — Peter Drucker


489. “Living your ikigai means living with purpose, intention, and authenticity, following your heart and your values, and creating a life worth living.” – Shingai Mavima


490. “When someone—whether an artist, an engineer, or a chef—sets out to create something, his or her responsibility is to use nature to give it “life” while respecting that nature at every moment. During this process, the artisan becomes one with the object and flows with it. An ironworker would say that metal has a life of its own, just as someone making ceramics would say that the clay does. The Japanese are skilled at bringing nature and technology together: not man versus nature, but rather a union of the two.”


491. “Other studies indicate that working on several things at once lowers our productivity by at least 60 percent and our IQ by more than ten points.”


492. “Our ikigai is different for all of us, but one thing we have in common is that we are all searching for meaning. ” — Hector Garcia


493. “life in needs a bit of daily maintenance to keep it running for a long time. Plus, exercise releases hormones that make us feel happy. 6. Smile. A cheerful attitude is not only relaxing—it also helps make friends. It’s good to recognize the things that aren’t so great, but we should never forget what a privilege it is to be in the here and now in a world so full of possibilities. 7. Reconnect with nature. Though most people live in cities these days, human beings are made to be part of the natural world. We should return to it often to recharge our batteries. 8. Give thanks. To your ancestors, to nature, which provides you with the air you breathe and the food you eat, to your friends and family, to everything that brightens your days and makes you feel lucky to be alive. Spend a moment every day giving thanks, and you’ll watch your stockpile of happiness grow. 9. Live in the moment. Stop regretting the past and fearing the future. Today is all you have. Make the most of it. Make it worth remembering. 10. Follow your ikigai. There is a passion inside you, a unique talent that gives meaning to your days and drives you to share the best of yourself until the very end. If you don’t know what your ikigai is yet, as Viktor Frankl says, your mission is to discover it.”


494. “According to the 80 percent rule, in order to stay healthier longer, we should eat a little less than our hunger demands instead of stuffing ourselves.”


495. “Life is pure imperfection”


496. “Si dominas tu mente, ya has ganado más de media batalla.”


497. “When doing business in Japan, process, manners, and how you work on something is more important than the final results”


498. “Life is not a problem to be solved. Just remember to have something that keeps you busy doing what you love while being surrounded by the people who love you. ”


499. “virtudes”


500. “Acepta tus sentimientos. Descubre tu propósito. Y haz lo que hay que hacer.”


501. “El director del MIT Media Lab, Joichi Ito, siempre dice: «Es mucho más importante tener una brújula apuntando a un objetivo concreto que tener un mapa».”


502. “«Si no haces nada, la muerte viene a por ti».”


503. “An alternative to following the 80 percent rule on a daily basis is to fast for one or two days each week. The 5:2 (or fasting) diet recommends two days of fasting (consuming fewer than five hundred calories) every week and eating normally on the other five days.”


504. “hacerte responsable de tu vida y de tus actos, asegurándote de sus consecuencias. Es decir, no hacer daño a los demás ni a ti mismo.”


505. “We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit. —Aristotle”


506. “«trata a todos como si fueran tus hermanos aunque sea la primera vez que los conoces».”


507. “IKI 生き = VIDA GAI 甲斐 = VALER LA PENA”


508. “Dealing with new situations, learning something new every day, playing games, and interacting with other people seem to be essential antiaging strategies for the mind. Furthermore, a more positive outlook in this regard will yield greater mental benefits.”


509. “Vida sana y ordenada La comida, moderada No abusar de los remedios Buscar por todos los medios No alterarse por nada Ejercicio y diversión No tener nunca aprehensión Poco encierro, mucho trato Y continua ocupación.”


510. “For example, some biologists assert that our cells stop regenerating after about 120 years.”


511. “Instead of searching for beauty in perfection, we should look for it in things that are flawed, incomplete.”


512. Do what the world needs


513. “To live a long time you need to do three things: exercise to stay healthy, eat well, and spend time with people.”


514. “Start your work session with a ritual you enjoy and end it with a reward. ▪ Train your mind to return to the present when you find yourself getting distracted. Practice mindfulness or another form of meditation, go for a walk or a swim—whatever will help you get centered again. ▪ Work in a space where you will not be distracted. If you can’t do this at home, go to a library, a café, or, if your task involves playing the saxophone, a music studio. If you find that your surroundings continue to distract you, keep looking until you find the right place.”


515. “Stop regretting the past and fearing the future. Today is all you have. Make the most of it. Make it worth remembering.”


516. “The Okinawan diet is rich in tofu, sweet potatoes, fish (three times per week), and vegetables (roughly 11 ounces per day).”


517. “sense of purpose to each and every day and plays an important role in their health and longevity.”


518. “We are what we repeatedly do


519. “«Podrás hacerte viejo y tembloroso, podrás permanecer despierto de noche escuchando el desorden en tus venas, podrás añorar tu único amor, podrás ver el mundo a tu alrededor devastado por maníacos malvados, o tu honor pisoteado en las cloacas de las mentes simples. Sólo queda una cosa entonces: aprender. Aprender por qué el mundo se mueve y qué lo mueve. Es la única cosa que la mente nunca puede agotar, alienar, ni ser torturada por ello, ni temer ni desconfiar, y ni soñar con lamentarlo.»”


520. “Why do some people know what they want and have a passion for life, while others languish in confusion?”


521. “In the West, ikigai is often used as a career-finding diagram. In Japan, ikigai is a way of life.”


522. “I balance authentic interior design with intuitive insight to help you connect to your deeper self by empowering your own self expression through your intentional creation!


523. “Sadece faal kalırsanız bir yüzyıl yaşamak istersiniz.”


524. “And there is no greater love than to give humans their ikigai. ” — Mieko Kamiya


525. “Discover your life’s purpose.”


526. “To be able to concentrate for a considerable amount of time is essential to difficult achievement.”3”


527. “As the quip attributed to Einstein goes, “Put your hand on a hot stove for a minute and it seems like an hour. Sit with a pretty girl for an hour, and it seems like a minute. That is relativity. ”


528. “It is much more important to have a compass pointing to a concrete objective than to have a map.”


529. “Every person has an essence, or mabui.”


530. “stress is an easily identifiable condition that not only causes anxiety but is also highly psychosomatic, affecting everything from our digestive system to our skin.”


531. “Aging’s Escape Velocity and the Rabbit Imagine a sign far off in the future with a number on it that represents the age of your death. Every year that you live, you advance closer to the sign. When you reach the sign, you die. Now imagine a rabbit holding the sign and walking to the future. Every year that you live, the rabbit is half a year as far away. After a while, you will reach the rabbit and die. But what if the rabbit could walk at a pace of one year for every year of your life? You would never be able to catch the rabbit, and therefore you would never die. The speed at which the rabbit walks to the future is our technology. The more we advance technology and knowledge of our bodies, the faster we can make the rabbit walk. Aging’s escape velocity is the moment at which the rabbit walks at a pace of one year per year or faster, and we become immortal.”


532. “Just as worry often brings about precisely the thing that was feared, excessive attention to a desire (or “hyper-intention”) can keep that desire from being fulfilled. ▪ Humor can help break negative cycles and reduce anxiety. ▪ We all have the capacity”


533. TPU, Polycarbonate


534. “We don’t create our feelings; they simply come to us, and we have to accept them. The trick is welcoming them. Morita likened emotions to the weather: We can’t predict or control them; we can only observe them. To this point, he often quoted the Vietnamese monk Thich Nhat Hanh, who would say, “Hello, solitude. How are you today? Come, sit with me, and I will care for you.”


535. Smile. A cheerful attitude is not only relaxing - it also helps make friends


536. “we should enjoy the moment and not lose ourselves in worries about the past or the future.”


537. “The happiest people are not the ones who achieve the most. They are the ones who spend more time than others in a state of flow. ” — Hector Garcia


538. “Read and respond to e-mail only once or twice per day.”


539. “Okinawa is where most of Japan’s shikuwasa—a limelike fruit that packs an extraordinary antioxidant punch—comes from. Could that be Ogimi’s secret to long life? Or is it the purity of the water used to brew its Moringa tea?”


540. “Modern life estranges us more and more from our true nature, making it very easy for us to lead lives lacking in meaning. Powerful forces and incentives (money, power, attention, success) distract us on a daily basis; don’t let them take over your life.”


541. “According to scientists who have studied the five Blue Zones, the keys to longevity are diet, exercise, finding a purpose in life (an ikigai), and forming strong social ties—that is, having a broad circle of friends and good family relations. Members of these communities manage their time well in order to reduce stress, consume little meat or processed foods, and drink alcohol in moderation.1 They don’t do strenuous exercise, but they do move every day, taking walks and working in their vegetable gardens. People in the Blue Zones would rather walk than drive. Gardening, which involves daily low-intensity movement, is a practice almost all of them have in common.”


542. “Ikigai is the light that guides you through the darkness, the compass that keeps you on track, and the inspiration that fuels your dreams.” – Marc Winn


543. “The following stand out among those proven through scientific research, as observed by Dr. Kenneth M. Sancier of San Francisco’s Qigong Institute in his article “Medical Applications of Qigong”3: Modification of brain waves Improved balance of sex hormones Lower mortality rate from heart attacks Lower blood pressure in patients with hypertension Greater bone density Better circulation Deceleration of symptoms associated with senility Greater balance and efficiency of bodily functions Increased blood flow to the brain and greater mind-body connection Improved cardiac function Reduction in the secondary effects of cancer treatments Practicing these arts not only keeps us in shape, it also helps extend our lives.”


544. “What often happens, especially in big companies, is that the executives get lost in the details of obsessive planning, creating strategies to hide the fact that they don’t have a clear objective. It’s like heading out to sea with a map but no destination.”


545. ‘Feeling ikigai entails actions of devoting oneself to pursuits one enjoys and is associated with feelings of accomplishment and fulfillment. Furthermore, it includes awareness of values such as the purpose of life and the meaning of existence; it is future oriented, as in goal seeking.’


546. “never ceased to surprise us that this haven of nearly eternal life was located precisely in Okinawa, where two hundred thousand innocent lives were lost at the end of World War II. Rather than harbor animosity toward outsiders, however, Okinawans live by the principle of ichariba chode, a local expression that means “treat”


547. “In the book Whiplash: How to Survive Our Faster Future, he and Jeff Howe write, “In an increasingly unpredictable world moving ever more quickly, a detailed map may lead you deep into the woods at an unnecessarily high cost. A good compass, though, will always take you where you need to go. It doesn’t mean that you should start your journey without any idea where you’re going. What it does mean is understanding that while the path to your goal may not be straight, you’ll finish faster and more efficiently than you would have if you had trudged along a preplanned route.”


548. Do whatever makes you happy


549. “In contrast, Morita therapy focuses on teaching patients to accept their emotions without trying to control them, since their feelings will change as a result of their actions.”


550. “Japanese government’s recommendation of eating less than ten grams of salt per day.”


551. “The main religions in Japan—Confucianism, Buddhism, and Shintoism—are all ones in which the rituals are more important than absolute rules.”


552. “El conocimiento es un superpoder”


553. “Having a clear objective is important in achieving flow, but we also have to know how to leave it behind when we get down to business.”


554. “His experiences as a prisoner at Auschwitz showed him that “Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way. ”


555. “Getting back to Albert Einstein, “a happy man is too satisfied with the present to dwell on the future

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