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513 Best 33 Strategies Of War Quotes: Robert Greene

1. “All armies prefer high ground to low and sunny places to dark.”


2. “A wise general makes a point of foraging of the enemy.” – Sun Tzu


3. “The greatest victory is that which requires no battle.” – Sun Tzu


4. “Do not repeat the tactics which have gained you one victory, but let your methods be regulated by the infinite variety of circumstances.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


5. “Anger may in time change to gladness; vexation may be succeeded by content. But a kingdom that has once been destroyed can never come again into being; nor can the dead ever be brought back to life.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


6. “Life has more meaning in the face of Death.” 


7. “Victorious warriors win first and then go to war, while defeated warriors go to war first and then seek to win.”


8. Thus we may know that there are five essentials for victory: (1) He will win who knows when to fight and when not to fight; (2) he will win who knows how to handle both superior and inferior forces; (3) he will win whose army is animated by the same spirit throughout all its ranks; (4) he will win who, prepared himself, waits to take the enemy unprepared; (5) he will win who has military capacity and is not interfered with by the sovereign.”


9. Quickness is the essence of the war.


10. He who is prudent and lies in wait for an enemy who is not, will be victorious.”


11. Wheels of justice grind slow but grind fine.”


12. “[I]n the wise leader’s plans, considerations of advantage and of disadvantage will be blended together.”


13. “Move swift as the Wind and closely-formed as the Wood. Attack like the Fire and be still as the Mountain.” – Sun Tzu


14. “Now an army is exposed to six several calamities, not arising from natural causes, but from faults for which the general is responsible. These are: (1) Flight; (2) insubordination; (3) collapse; (4) ruin; (5) disorganization; (6) rout.”


15. “The difficulty of tactical maneuvering consists in turning the devious into the direct, and misfortune into gain.”― Sun Tzu


16. “It is easy to love your friend, but sometimes the hardest lesson to learn is to love your enemy.”


17. “The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting.” 


18. “No ruler should put troops into the field merely to gratify his own spleen; no general should fight a battle simply out of pique.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


19. “Throw your soldiers into positions whence there is no escape, and they will prefer death to flight. If they will face death, there is nothing they may not achieve.”


20. Those skilled at making the enemy move do so by creating a situation to which he must conform; they entice him with something he is certain to take, and with lures of ostensible profit they await him in strength.”


21. “The consummate leader cultivates the moral law, and strictly adheres to method and discipline; thus it is in his power to control success.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


22. The opportunity of defeating the enemy is provided by the enemy himself.”


23. “A leader leads by example not by force.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


24. “For what the leaders are, that, as a rule, will the men below them be. —Xenophon (430?–355? B.C.)” 


25. “Thus the energy developed by good fighting men is as the momentum of a round stone rolled down a mountain thousands of feet in height.”


26. “Establish a frightening reputation. People will back off from you, treating you with respect and a little fear.”


27. “Supreme excellence consists of breaking the enemy’s resistance without fighting.” Meaning


28. “If fighting is sure to result in victory, then you must fight, even though the ruler forbid it; if fighting will not result in victory, then you must not fight even at the ruler's bidding.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


29. “The difficulty of tactical maneuvering consists in turning the devious into the direct, and misfortune into gain.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


30. “Begin by seizing something which your opponent holds dear; then he will be amenable to your will.”


31. “In raiding and plundering be like fire, in immovability like a mountain.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


32. “To win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the acme of skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the acme of skill.” – Sun Tzu


33. “Lose battles, but win the war. Grand strategy is the art of looking beyond the present battle and calculating ahead. Focus on your ultimate goal and plot to ...


34. “[T]hat general is skillful in attack whose opponent does not know what to defend; and he is skillful in defense whose opponent does not know what to attack.”


35. “Be extremely subtle even to the point of formlessness. Be extremely mysterious even to the point of soundlessness. Thereby you can be the director of the opponent’s fate.” Meaning


36. “If you know the enemy and know yourself, your victory will not stand in doubt.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


37. “Thus we may know that there are five essentials for victory: Meaning


38. This will enable you to control the situation and bewilder and exhaust your opponent.


39. “To take a long and circuitous route, after enticing the enemy out of the way, and though starting after him, to contrive to reach the goal before him, shows knowledge of the artifice of deviation.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


40. Energy may be likened to the bending of a crossbow; decision, to the releasing of a trigger.”


41. He will win who has military capacity and is not interfered with by the sovereign.”


42. Who wishes to fight must first count the cost.”


43. “We may distinguish six kinds of terrain, to wit: (1) Accessible ground; (2) entangling ground; (3) temporizing ground; (4) narrow passes; (5) precipitous heights; (6) positions at a great distance from the enemy.”


44. “Thus it is that in war the victorious strategist only seeks battle after the victory has been won, whereas he who is destined to defeat first fights and afterwards looks for victory.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


45. “Build your opponent a golden bridge to retreat across.” – Sun Tzu


46. To know your enemy, you must become your enemy.”


47. “The following are the principles to be observed by an invading force: The further you penetrate into a country, the greater will be the solidarity of your troops, and thus the defenders will not prevail against you.”


48. “[Strategy] is more than a science: it is the application of knowledge to practical life, the development of thought capable of modifying the original guiding idea in the light of ever-changing situations; it is the art of acting under the pressure of the most difficult conditions. HELMUTH VON MOLTKE, 1800–1891” 


49. If there is disturbance in the camp, the general's authority is weak.


50. “We cannot enter into alliances until we are acquainted with the designs of our neighbors.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


51. “Attack is the secret of defense; defense is the planning of an attack.” – Sun Tzu


52. Learn to smoke out your enemies, to ...


53. “Attack him where he is unprepared, appear where you are not expected.”


54. When the outlook is bright, bring it before their eyes; but tell them nothing when the situation is gloomy.”


55. “The truth is that everything starts from the top. What determines your failure or success is your style of leadership and the chain of command that you design.” 


56. Capture and destroy it.


57. Their aggressive acts will benefit you and garner support from others. Since there is the presentation of both "good" and "bad" traits, people normally see only the positive approach.


58. Be where your enemy is not.”


59. “[A] wise general makes a point of foraging on the enemy. One cartload of the enemy’s provisions is equivalent to twenty of one’s own, and likewise a single picul of his provender is equivalent to twenty from one’s own store.”


60. You have to believe in yourself.”


61. All warfare is based on deception. Hence, when we are able to attack, we must seem unable; when using our forces, we must appear inactive; when we are near, we must make the enemy believe we are far away; when far away, we must make him believe we are near.”


62. “Be subtle! be subtle! and use your spies for every kind of business.”


63. “Everything in life can be taken away from you and generally will be at some point. Your wealth vanishes, the latest gadgetry suddenly becomes passé, your allies desert you. But if your mind is armed with the art of war, there is no power that can take that away. In the middle of a crisis, your mind will find its way to the right solution. Having superior strategies at your fingertips will give your maneuvers irresistible force. As Sun-tzu says, “Being unconquerable lies with yourself.” 


64. “Begin by seizing something which your opponent holds dear; then he will be amenable to your will.” — Sun Tzu


65. “You must cut yourself loose from the past and open your eyes to the present.”


66. “So in war, the way is to avoid what is strong, and strike at what is weak.” Meaning


67. Plan for what it is difficult while it is easy, do what is great while it is small.”


68. “You may think that what you’d like to recapture from your youth is your looks, your physical fitness, your simple pleasures, but what you really need is the fluidity of mind you once possessed.” 


69. “You have to believe in yourself.” – Sun Tzu


70. “Actually, your past successes are your biggest obstacle: every battle, every war, is different, and you cannot assume that what worked before will work today.” 


71. “There is no instance of a nation benefitting from prolonged warfare.”


72. There are roads which must not be followed, armies which must not be attacked, towns which must not be besieged, positions which must not be contested, commands of the sovereign which must not be obeyed.”


73. Do not be too authoritarian and not too weak


74. “It is easy to love your friend, but sometimes the hardest lesson to learn is to love your enemy”


75. Even the finest sword plunged into salt water will eventually rust.”


76. With this in place, strive toward that goal relentlessly.


77. “To know your Enemy, you must become your Enemy.” – Sun Tzu


78. “Numerical weakness comes from having to prepare against possible attacks; numerical strength, from compelling our adversary to make these preparations against us.”


79. “As Xenophon said, your obstacles are not rivers or mountains or other people; your obstacle is yourself. If you feel lost and confused, if you lose your sense of direction, if you cannot tell the difference between friend and foe, you have only” 


80. “When you surround an army, leave an outlet free. Do not press a desperate foe too hard.” Meaning


81. “Water shapes its course according to the nature of the ground over which it flows; the soldier works out his victory in relation to the foe whom he is facing.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


82. “Everything in life can be taken away from you and generally will be at some point. Your wealth vanishes, the latest gadgetry suddenly becomes passé, your allies desert you. But, if your mind is armed with the art of war, there is no power that can take that away. In the middle of a crisis, your mind will find its way to the right solution. Having superior strategies at your fingertips will give your maneuvers irresistible force. As Sun-tzu says, ‘Being unconquerable lies with yourself.’”


83. “We do not place especial value on the possession of a virtue until we notice its total absence in our opponent.” 


84. “In war, practice dissimulation, and you will succeed.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


85. “Life has more meaning in the face of Death.”


86. He will win whose army is animated by the same spirit throughout all its ranks.


87. Hence that general is skillful in attack whose opponent does not know what to defend; and he is skillful in defense whose opponent does not know what to attack.”


88. “It was only by escaping into the desert that Moses and the Jews were able to solidify their identity and reemerge as a social and political force.


89. “Let your rapidity be that of the wind, your compactness that of the forest.” — Sun Tzu


90. “Your mind is the starting point of all war and all strategy. A mind that is easily overwhelmed by emotion, that is rooted in the past instead of the present, ...


91. Wait; draw them to make the first move. Analyze their strategy and counterattack based on the weaknesses they reveal.


92. “Our successes and failures in life can be traced to how well or how badly we deal with the inevitable conflicts that confront us in society.” 


93. He recruited like minded individuals and commanded a formidable unit.


94. “Rouse him, and learn the principle of his activity or inactivity. Force him to reveal himself, so as to find out his vulnerable spots.” – Sun Tzu


95. “Someone who smiles too much with you can sometime frown too much with you at your back.” 


96. You may think that what you’d like to recapture from your youth is your looks, your physical fitness, your simple pleasures, but what you really need is the fluidity of mind you once possessed.


97. “The quality of decision is like the well-timed swoop of a falcon which enables it to strike and destroy its victim.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


98. “Concentrate your energy and hoard your strength.” – Sun Tzu


99. “If his forces are united, separate them.”


100. “Understand: Your mind is weaker than your emotions. But you become aware of this weakness only in moments of adversity—precisely the time when you need strength. What best equips you to cope with the heat of battle is neither more knowledge nor more intellect. What makes your mind stronger, and more able to control your emotions, is internal discipline and toughness. No one can teach you this skill; you cannot learn it by reading about it. Like any discipline, it can come only through practice, experience, even a little suffering. The first step in building up presence of mind is to see the need for it—to want it badly enough to be willing to work for it.”


101. “To win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the acme of skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the acme of skill.” 


102. “If you are far from the enemy, make him believe you are near.” – Sun Tzu


103. “There are not more than five musical notes, yet the combinations of these five give rise to more melodies than can ever be heard.”


104. “If he is secure at all points, be prepared for him. If he is in superior strength, evade him.”― Sun Tzu


105. Build your opponent a golden bridge to retreat across.”


106. Great results can be achieved with small forces.”


107. “If he sends reinforcements everywhere, he will everywhere be weak.” — Sun Tzu


108. “There is a nocturna for every single person in the world! And each night the nocturni sip dreams from the River of Knowledge, and fly out into the world, and deliver them to their humans.” 


109. “The primary thing when you take a sword in your hands is your intention to cut the enemy, whatever the means. Whenever you parry, hit, spring, strike or touch the enemy's cutting sword, you must cut the enemy in the same movement. It is essential to attain this. If you think only of hitting, springing, striking or touching the enemy, you will not be able actually to cut him.” 


110. “Forestall your opponent by seizing what he holds dear, and subtly contrive to time his arrival on the ground.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


111. “He will win who, prepared himself, waits to take the enemy unprepared.” – Sun Tzu


112. “I need you to be clever, Bean. I need you to think of solutions to problems we haven't seen yet. I want you to try things that no one has ever tried because they're absolutely stupid.” 


113. “I have heard that in war haste can be folly, but have never seen delay that was wise.” – Sun Tzu


114. “The greatest victory is that which requires no battle.” Meaning


115. “Understand: in life as in war, nothing ever happens just as you expect it to.”


116. “There are roads which must not be followed, armies which must not be attacked, towns which must not be besieged, positions which must not be contested, commands of the sovereign which must not be obeyed.” 


117. He used the fear of public reprimand to keep team members in line.


118. “Victory comes from finding opportunities in problems.” – Sun Tzu


119. “Know yourself and you will win all battles.” – Sun Tzu


120. People want an easy victory and will not attack if they think they will lose.


121. “If it is to your advantage, make a forward move; if not, stay where you are.” — Sun Tzu


122. Do not fight them. Instead think of them the way you think of children, or pets, not important enough to affect your mental balance 


123. “Understand: the greatest generals, the most creative strategists, stand out not because they have more knowledge but because they are able, when necessary, to drop their preconceived notions and focus intensely on the present moment. That is how creativity is sparked and opportunities are seized. Knowledge, experience, and theory have limitations: no amount of thinking in advance can prepare you for the chaos of life, for the infinite possibilities of the moment. The great philosopher of war Carl von Clausewitz called this “friction”: the difference between our plans and what actually happens. Since friction is inevitable, our minds have to be capable of keeping up with change and adapting to the unexpected. The better we can adapt our thoughts to changing circumstances, the more realistic our responses to them will be. The more we lose ourselves in predigested theories and past experiences, the more inappropriate and delusional our response.” 


124. “It is easy to love your friend, but sometimes the hardest lesson to learn is to love your enemy.” – Sun Tzu


125. “One mark of a great soldier is that he fight on his own terms or fights not at all.”


126. “The skillful soldier does not raise a second levy, neither are his supply-wagons loaded more than twice.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


127. “If soldiers are punished before they have grown attached to you, they will not prove submissive; and, unless submissive, then will be practically useless. If, when the soldiers have become attached to you, punishments are not enforced, they will still be unless.”


128. Misinformation and decoys can consume your opponent.


129. “Your days are numbered. Will you pass them half awake and halfhearted or will you live with a sense of urgency?”


130. Victorious warriors win first and then go to war, while defeated warriors go to war first and then seek to win.”


131. “Rapidity is the essence of war: take advantage of the enemy’s unreadiness, make your way by unexpected routes, and attack unguarded spots.”


132. “He who exercises no forethought but makes light of his opponents is sure to be captured by them.”


133. “The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting.” Sun Tzu. author. The Art of War. book. war. concept.


134. “Know thy self, know thy enemy. A thousand battles, a thousand victories.” – Sun Tzu


135. “If your opponent is of choleric temper, seek to irritate him. Pretend to be weak, that he may grow arrogant.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


136. “What enables the wise sovereign and the good general to strike and conquer, and achieve things beyond the reach of ordinary men, is foreknowledge.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


137. “If you wait by the river long enough, the bodies of your enemies will float by.” – Sun Tzu


138. “If he sends reinforcements everywhere, he will everywhere be weak.”


139. Not fighting, when they know you can, will aggravate your opponent and increase the chance of them making an irrational move.


140. “Victorious warriors win first and then go to war, while defeated warriors go to war first and then seek to win” 


141. Undermine the alliances of your opponents to weaken them.


142. To fight and conquer in all our battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists in breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting.


143. “Victorious warriors win first and then go to war, while defeated warriors go to war first and then seek to win.” – Sun Tzu


144. “There are five dangerous faults which may affect a general: (1) Recklessness, which leads to destruction; (2) cowardice, which leads to capture; (3) a hasty temper, which can be provoked by insults; (4) a delicacy of honor which is sensitive to shame; (5) over-solicitude for his men, which exposes him to worry and trouble.”


145. “In night-fighting, then, make much use of signalfires and drums, and in fighting by day, of flags and banners, as a means of influencing the ears and eyes of your army.”


146. “If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.” – Sun Tzu


147. “Can you imagine what I would do if I could do all I can?” – Sun Tzu


148. “For it is precisely when a force has fallen into harm’s way that is capable of striking a blow for victory.”


149. “When one treats people with benevolence, justice, and righteousness, and reposes confidence in them, the army will be united in mind and all will be happy to serve their leaders.” – Sun Tzu


150. “Thus the expert in battle moves the enemy, and is not moved by him.”


151. “The experienced soldier, once in motion, is never bewildered; once he has broken camp, he is never at a loss.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


152. “Move not unless you see an advantage; use not your troops unless there is something to be gained; fight not unless the position is critical.”


153. “The whole secret lies in confusing the enemy, so that he cannot fathom our real intent.”


154. “Do not engage an enemy more powerful than you. And if it is unavoidable and you do have to engage, then make sure you engage it on your terms, not on your enemy’s terms.” – Sun Tzu


155. “Great results can be achieved with small forces.” – Sun Tzu


156. “Ponder and deliberate before you make a move.”


157. “Don't hit at all if it is honorably possible to avoid hitting; but never hit soft!” 


158. “Let your plans be dark and impenetrable as night, and when you move, fall like a thunderbolt.” 


159. Be assertive. Control your opponent's mind. Move them into your territory.


160. “The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting.” 74. “Appear weak when you are strong, and strong when you ...


161. “In the midst of chaos, there is also opportunity” 


162. “Your mind is the starting point of all war and all strategy. A mind that is easily overwhelmed by emotion, that is rooted in the past instead of the present, that cannot see the world with clarity and urgency, will create strategies that will always miss the mark.” 


163. “The art of war, then, is governed by five constant factors, to be taken into account in one’s deliberations, when seeking to determine the conditions obtaining in the field. These are: (1) The Moral Law; (2) Heaven; (3) Earth; (4) The Commander; (5) Method and discipline.”


164. “The art of war recognizes nine varieties of ground: (1) Dispersive ground; (2) facile ground; (3) contentious ground; (4) open ground; (5) ground of intersecting highways; (6) serious ground; (7) difficult ground; (8) hemmed-in ground; (9) desperate ground.”


165. “Hold out baits to entice the enemy. Feign disorder, and crush him.”


166. “All warfare is based on deception. Hence, when we are able to attack, we must seem unable; when using our forces, we must appear inactive; when we are near, we must make the enemy believe we are far away; when far away, we must make him believe we are near.” 


167. “When you have success, be extra wary. When you are angry, take no action. When you are fearful, know you are going to exaggerate the dangers you face. War demands the utmost in realism, seeing things as they are. The more you can limit or compensate for your emotional responses, the closer you will come to this ideal.” 


168. “The whole secret lies in confusing the enemy, so that he cannot fathom our real intent.” – Sun Tzu


169. “Being attacked is a sign that you are important enough to be a target. You should relish the attention and the chance to prove yourself.” 


170. 12--Lose Battles, But Win The War: Grand Strategy Grand strategy is the art of looking beyond the present battle and calculating ahead. Focus on your ultimate goal and plot to reach it. 


171. Water shapes its course according to the nature of the ground over which it flows; the soldier works out his victory in relation to the foe whom he is facing.”


172. “Every animal with blood in its veins and horns on its head will fight when it is attacked.”― Sun Tzu


173. “If you know the enemy and you know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle”


174. If the choice is life or death they have nothing to lose.


175. “Carefully compare the opposing army with your own, so that you may know where strength is superabundant and where it is deficient.” — Sun Tzu


176. One may know how to conquer without being able to do it.”


177. “In a divided world, power will come from keeping your own group united and cohesive.”


178. Know how to win with flair and bring a positive conclusion to the encounter; reducing your opponents in the future.


179. “The art of war is of vital importance to the State. It is a matter of life and death, a road either to safety or to ruin. Hence it is a subject of inquiry which can on no account be neglected.” Meaning


180. “Knowing the enemy enables you to take the offensive, knowing yourself enables you to stand on the defensive.”― Sun Tzu


181. “If your enemy is secure at all points, be prepared for him. If he is in superior strength, evade him. If your opponent is temperamental, seek to irritate him. Pretend to be weak, that he may grow arrogant. If he is taking his ease, give him no rest. If his forces are united, separate them. If sovereign and subject are in accord, put division between them. Attack him where he is unprepared, appear where you are not expected .” 


182. “Place your army in deadly peril, and it will survive; plunge it into desperate straits, and it will come off in safety.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


183. “O divine art of subtlety and secrecy! Through you we learn to be invisible, through you inaudible; and hence we can hold the enemy’s fate in our hands.”


184. “Your days are numbered. Will you pass them half awake and halfhearted or will you live with a sense of urgency?” 


185. “It is your own bad strategies, not the unfair opponent, that are to blame for your failures. You are responsible for the good and bad in your life.” 


186. “Violent language and driving forward as if to the attack are signs that he will retreat.” – Sun Tzu


187. “All wars are won or lost before they are ever fought.” – Sun Tzu


188. “There is no instance of a country having benefited from prolonged warfare.”


189. “Bravery without forethought, causes a man to fight blindly and desperately like a mad bull. Such an opponent, must not be encountered with brute force, but may be lured into an ambush and slain.”


190. “When you have success, be extra wary. When you are angry, take no action. When you are fearful, know you are going to exaggerate the dangers you face.”


191. “The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting.”


192. “[W]hat enables the wise sovereign and the good general to strike and conquer, and achieve things beyond the reach of ordinary men, is foreknowledge.”


193. “[T]he skillful fighter puts himself into a position which makes defeat impossible, and does not miss the moment for defeating the enemy.”


194. “Be extremely subtle even to the point of formlessness. Be extremely mysterious even to the point of soundlessness. Thereby you can be the director of the opponent’s fate.”


195. Never venture, never win!”


196. “Do not swallow bait offered by the enemy. Do not interfere with an army that is returning home.”


197. “who wishes to fight must first count the cost” Meaning


198. “Those who win every battle are not really skillful—those who render others’ armies helpless without fighting are the best of all.”― Sun Tzu


199. “Who wishes to fight must first count the cost”


200. Be extremely subtle even to the point of formlessness. Be extremely mysterious even to the point of soundlessness. Thereby you can be the director of the opponent's fate.”


201. “The line between disorder and order lies in logistics.” – Sun Tzu


202. “There are not more than five musical notes, yet the combinations of these five give rise to more melodies than can ever be heard. There are not more than five primary colours, yet in combination they produce more hues than can ever been seen. There are not more than five cardinal tastes, yet combinations of them yield more flavours than can ever be tasted.”


203. “”The good fighters of old first put themselves beyond the possibility of defeat, and then waited for an opportunity of defeating the enemy.” – Sun Tzu


204. In battle, there are not more than two methods of attack--the direct and the indirect; yet these two in combination give rise to an endless series of maneuvers.”


205. The whole secret lies in confusing the enemy, so that he cannot fathom our real intent.”


206. “Once people see you as a fighter, they will approach you with a little fear in their hearts.”


207. “Do not repeat the tactics which have gained you one victory, but let your methods be regulated by the infinite variety of circumstances.”


208. “All men can see these tactics whereby I conquer, but what none can see is the strategy out of which victory is evolved.” – Sun Tzu


209. “The art of war teaches us to rely not on the likelihood of the enemy’s not coming, but on our own readiness to receive him; not on the chance of his not attacking, but rather on the fact that we have made our position unassailable.”


210. “What the ancients called a clever fighter is one who not only wins but excels in winning with ease.” – Sun Tzu


211. The greatest victory is that which requires no battle.”


212. “Using order to deal with the disorderly, using calm to deal with the clamorous, is mastering the heart.”― Sun Tzu


213. “Let your rapidity be that of the wind, your compactness that of the forest.” Meaning


214. “When you surround an army, leave an outlet free. Do not press a desperate foe too hard.”


215. “He who is prudent and lies in wait for an enemy who is not, will be victorious.” – Sun Tzu


216. “Energy may be likened to the bending of a crossbow; decision, to the releasing of the trigger.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


217. “Anger and impatience will draw you into rash actions that will cut off your options.”


218. “Being attacked is a sign that you are important enough to be a target.”


219. “The art of war is of vital importance to the State. It is a matter of life and death, a road either to safety or to ruin.”


220. “But the greatest battle of all is with yourself—your weaknesses, your emotions, your lack of resolution in seeing things through to the end. You must declare unceasing war on yourself.” 


221. The wise warrior avoids the battle.”


222. The skillful tactician may be likened to the shuai-jan. Now the shuai-jan is a snake that is found in the Ch'ang mountains. Strike at its head, and you will be attacked by its tail; strike at its tail, and you will be attacked by its head; strike at its middle, and you will be attacked by head and tail both.”


223. “In the midst of chaos, there is also opportunity”


224. “Engage people with what they expect; it is what they are able to discern and confirms their projections. It settles them into predictable patterns of response, occupying their minds while you wait for the extraordinary moment — that which they cannot anticipate.” Meaning


225. “What the ancients called a clever fighter is one who not only wins, but excels in winning with ease.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


226. “Do not fight them. Instead think of them the way you think of children, or pets, not important enough to affect your mental balance” 


227. “You can be sure of succeeding in your attacks if you only attack places which are undefended.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


228. “The skillful soldier does not raise a second levy, neither are his supply-wagons loaded more than twice.”


229. “If soldiers are punished before they have grown attached to you, they will not prove submissive;


230. “Ponder and deliberate before you make a move.” – Sun Tzu


231. “Events in life mean nothing if you do not reflect on them in a deep way, and ideas from books are pointless if they have no application to life as you live it.” 


232. Actually, your past successes are your biggest obstacle: every battle, every war, is different, and you cannot assume that what worked before will work today. 


233. “In order to rule a nation of people you have to destroy morality and integrity. So what you do is you feed them drugs and alcohol and sex and tear apart the family.”


234. Foreknowledge cannot be gotten from ghosts and spirits, cannot be had by analogy, cannot be found out by calculation. It must be obtained from people, people who know the conditions of the enemy.”


235. “The peak efficiency of knowledge and strategy is to make conflict unnecessary.” – Sun Tzu


236. “The opportunity of defeating the enemy is provided by the enemy himself.” – Sun Tzu


237. “Unhappy is the fate of one who tries to win his battles and succeed in his attacks without cultivating the spirit of enterprise, for the result is waste of time and general stagnation.” – Sun Tzu


238. “He who can modify his tactics in relation to his opponent and thereby succeed in winning, may be called a heaven-born captain.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


239. “Sweat more during peace: bleed less during war.” – Sun Tzu


240. “Regard your soldiers as your children, and they will follow you into the deepest valleys; look upon them as your own beloved sons, and they will stand by you even unto death.”


241. In the midst of chaos, there is also opportunity.”


242. “The art of war is of vital importance to the State. It is a matter of life and death, a road either to safety or to ruin. Hence it is a subject of inquiry which can on no account be neglected.”


243. Hide your involvement and maintain your innocent.


244. “Forgetting our objectives. —During the journey we commonly forget its goal. Almost every profession is chosen and commenced as a means to an end but continued as an end in itself. Forgetting our objectives is the most frequent of all acts of stupidity. FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE, 1844” 


245. “Making no mistakes is what establishes the certainty of victory, for it means conquering an enemy that is already defeated.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


246. “[T]o fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists in breaking the enemy’s resistance without fighting.”


247. “There is no instance of a nation benefiting from prolonged warfare.” – Sun Tzu


248. “The whole secret lies in confusing the enemy, so that he cannot fathom our real intent.” Meaning


249. “The general who is skilled in defense hides in the most secret recesses of the earth; he who is skilled in attack flashes forth from the topmost heights of heaven.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


250. “The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting.” Meaning


251. It is only the enlightened ruler and the wise general who will use the highest intelligence of the army for the purposes of spying, and thereby they achieve great results.”


252. “Engage people with what they expect; it is what they are able to discern and confirms their projections. It settles them into predictable patterns of response, occupying their minds while you wait for the extraordinary moment — that which they cannot anticipate.”


253. “Victorious warriors win first and then go to war, while defeated warriors go to war first and then seek to win” Meaning


254. “Be extremely subtle, even to the point of formlessness. Be extremely mysterious, even to the point of soundlessness. Thereby you can be the director of the opponent’s fate.”― Sun Tzu


255. What was once safe is now uncertain.


256. “Know the enemy, know yourself and victory is never in doubt, not in a hundred battles.”― Sun Tzu


257. “The worst calamities that befall an army arise from hesitation.”


258. “Do not press an enemy at bay.” – Sun Tzu


259. “Plan for what it is difficult while it is easy, do what is great while it is small.” — Sun Tzu


260. “Strategy without tactics is the slowest route to victory. Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat.”  – Sun Tzu


261. “Persistence. Perfection. Patience. Power. Prioritize your passion. It keeps you sane.” 


262. “All war is deception.” – Sun Tzu


263. “Grand strategy is the art of looking beyond the present battle and calculating ahead. Focus on your ultimate goal and plot to reach it.“


264. “Success in warfare is gained by carefully accommodating ourselves to the enemy's purpose.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


265. “When the enemy is relaxed, make them toil. When full, starve them. When settled, make them move.” – Sun Tzu


266. “All warfare is based on deception.” Meaning


267. “Never open the door to a lesser evil, for other and greater ones invariably slink in after it.” 


268. “Thus the expert in battle moves the enemy, and is not moved by him.” – Sun Tzu


269. “Most people live their lives as if the end were always years away. They measure their days in love, laughter, accomplishment, and loss. There are moments of sunshine and storm. There are schedules, phone calls, careers, anxieties, joys, exotic trips, favorite foods, romance, shame, and hunger. A person can be defined by clothing, the smell of his breath, the way she combs her hair, the shape of his torso, or even the company she keeps.” 


270. “The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting.” – Sun Tzu


271. “What the ancients called a clever fighter is one who not only wins, but excels in winning with ease.”


272. “There are not more than five musical notes, yet the combinations of these five give rise to more melodies than can ever be heard.” Meaning


273. “When the enemy is relaxed, make them toil. When full, starve them. When settled, make them move.”


274. He will win who knows when to fight and when not to fight.


275. “Supreme excellence consists of breaking the enemy’s resistance without fighting.” – Sun Tzu


276. “The control of a large force is the same principle as the control of a few men: it is merely a question of dividing up their numbers.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


277. The general who wins the battle makes many calculations in his temple before the battle is fought. The general who loses makes but few calculations beforehand.” – Sun Tzu


278. “By shifting his camp and taking circuitous routes, he prevents the enemy from anticipating his purpose.”


279. “If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.” Meaning


280. “Now the general who wins a battle makes many calculations in his temple ere the battle is fought. The general who loses a battle makes but few calculations beforehand.”


281. “The key to staying unintimidated is to convince yourself that the person you’re facing is a mere mortal, no different from you—which is in fact the truth. See the person, not the myth. Imagine him or her as a child, as someone riddled with insecurities. Cutting the other person down to size will help your keep your mental balance.”


282. “The clever combatant looks to the effect of combined energy, and does not require too much from individuals.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


283. “Always leave a way out, unless you really want to find out how hard a man can fight when he’s nothing to lose.” 


284. “If you know the enemy and know yourself, your victory will not stand in doubt; if you know Heaven and know Earth, you may make your victory complete.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


285. “If the mind is willing, the flesh could go on and on without many things.” – Sun Tzu


286. “Can you define "plan" as "a loose sequence of manifestly inadequate observations and conjectures, held together by panic, indecision, and ignorance"? If so, it was a very good plan.” 


287. “O divine art of subtlety and secrecy! Through you we learn to be invisible, through you inaudible; and hence we can hold the enemy's fate in our hands.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


288. “12--Lose Battles, But Win The War: Grand Strategy


289. Your fears are a kind of prison that confines you within a limited ... ... 50 Cent on business advice, undercover economics, ...


290. “The art of giving orders is not to try to rectify the minor blunders and not to be swayed by petty doubts.” – Sun Tzu


291. If your opponent is temperamental, seek to irritate him. Pretend to be weak, that he may grow arrogant. If he is taking his ease, give him no rest. If his forces are united, separate them. If sovereign and subject are in accord, put division between them. Attack him where he is unprepared, appear where you are not expected.


292. “If the enemy know not where he will be attacked, he must prepare in every quarter, and so be everywhere weak.”― Sun Tzu


293. “Thus we may know that there are five essentials for victory: (1) He will win who knows when to fight and when not to fight. (2) He will win who knows how to handle both superior and inferior forces. (3) He will win whose army is animated by the same spirit throughout all its ranks. (4) He will win who, prepared himself, waits to take the enemy unprepared. (5) He will win who has military capacity and is not


294. “In all fighting, the direct method may be used for joining battle, but indirect methods will be needed in order to secure victory.”


295. “At first, then, exhibit the coyness of a maiden, until the enemy gives you an opening; afterwards emulate the rapidity of a running hare, and it will be too late for the enemy to oppose you.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


296. Bravery without forethought, causes a man to fight blindly and desperately like a mad bull. Such an opponent, must not be encountered with brute force, but may be lured into an ambush and slain.”


297. “Walk in the path defined by rule, and accommodate yourself to the enemy until you can fight a decisive battle.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


298. “Rewards for good service should not be deferred a single day.” – Sun Tzu


299. “So many books, so little time.” ― Frank Zappa


300. Respect your troops.


301. “But the bigots always see those whom they hate as morally corrupt, as if they confuse their own aesthetics of disgust and fear with actual ethical critique, rationalizing their emotional response, and enforcing their moral certainties with passion, establishing them-selves, subtly or brutally, as arbiters of reason.”


302. “The art of war is of vital importance to the State. It is a matter of life and death, a road either to safety or to ruin.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


303. “The key to staying unintimidated is to convince yourself that the person you're facing is a mere mortal, no different from you-- which is in fact the truth. See the person, not the myth. Imagine him or her as a child, as someone riddled with insecurities. Cutting the other person down to size will help your keep your mental balance.” 


304. By the time they notice your growth, it may be too late.


305. “Maneuvering with an army is advantageous; with an undisciplined multitude, most dangerous.”


306. Treat your men as you would your own beloved sons. And they will follow you into the deepest valley.”


307. When full, starve them. When settled, make them move.” Meaning


308. “The general who wins a battle makes many calculations in his temple ere the battle is fought. The general who loses a battle makes but few calculations beforehand.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


309. The art of war is of vital importance to the State. It is a matter of life and death, a road either to safety or to ruin. Hence it is a subject of inquiry which can on no account be neglected.”


310. “Attack is the secret of defense; defense is the planning of an attack.” 


311. “The secret enemy, though, will react with anger. Any strong emotion and you will know that there’s something boiling under the surface.


312. “Simulated disorder postulates perfect discipline; simulated fear postulates courage; simulated weakness postulates strength.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


313. “It is more important to out-think your enemy than to outfight him” – Sun Tzu


314. “Move not unless you see an advantage; use not your troops unless there is something to be gained; fight not unless the position is critical.”― Sun Tzu


315. “In making tactical dispositions, the highest pitch you can attain is to conceal them.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


316. “[J]ust as water retains no constant shape, so in warfare there are no constant conditions.”


317. It is easy to love your friend, but sometimes the hardest lesson to learn is to love your enemy.”


318. “In the midst of chaos, there is also opportunity.”


319. “If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


320. “Don’t spit into heaven... Don’t tell the gods your plans; they’ll only laugh.” 


321. “In battle, there are not more than two methods of attack—the direct and the indirect; yet these two in combination give rise to an endless series of maneuvers.”


322. “The quality of decision is like the well-timed swoop of a falcon which enables it to strike and destroy its victim.” – Sun Tzu


323. “Who wishes to fight must first count the cost” – Sun Tzu


324. “Let your plans be dark and impenetrable as night, and when you move, fall like a thunderbolt.” Sun Tzu, The Art of War


325. “Carefully compare the opposing army with your own, so that you may know where strength is superabundant and where it is deficient.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


326. “Opportunities multiply as they are seized.” – Sun Tzu


327. “When envoys are sent with compliments in their mouths, it is a sign that the enemy wishes for a truce.” – Sun Tzu


328. “A wise man gets more use from his enemies than a fool from his friends.” 


329. As Xenophon said, your obstacles are not rivers or mountains or other people; your obstacle is yourself. If you feel lost and confused, if you lose your sense of direction, if you cannot tell the difference between friend and foe, you have only yourself to blame. 


330. “In making tactical dispositions, the highest pitch you can attain is to conceal them; conceal your dispositions, and you will be safe from the prying of the subtlest spies, from the machinations of the wisest brains.”


331. “Lose battles, but win the war. Grand strategy is the art of looking beyond the present battle and calculating ahead. Focus on your ultimate goal and plot to reach it.”


332. Do not create a front or make your front so broad that attacking it attacks their base. No targets will frustrate your opponents increasing the chance they will make a mistake.


333. “If you know the enemy and know yourself you need not fear the results of a hundred battles.” – Sun Tzu


334. “If ignorant both of your enemy and yourself, you are certain to be in peril.” – Sun Tzu


335. “How to make the best of both strong and weak—that is a question involving the proper use of ground.”


336. “The art of war is of vital importance to the State. · 2. “All warfare is ...


337. “Arm yourself with prudence, and never completely lay down your arms, not even for friends.”


338. “Let your rapidity be that of the wind, your compactness that of the forest.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


339. As Xenophon said, your obstacles are not rivers or mountains or other people; your obstacle is yourself. If you feel lost and confused, if you lose your sense of direction, if you cannot tell the difference between friend and foe, you have only 


340. “He wins his battles by making no mistakes.”― Sun Tzu


341. “There is no instance of a country having benefited from prolonged warfare.” – Sun Tzu


342. “If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.” 


343. “Appear weak when you are strong, and strong when you are weak.”


344. “When invading hostile territory, the general principle is, that penetrating deeply brings cohesion; penetrating but a short way means dispersion.”


345. “Convince your enemy that he will gain very little by attacking you; this will diminish his enthusiasm.” – Sun Tzu


346. There is no instance of a nation benefiting from prolonged warfare.”


347. “If you are strong, appear weak. But if you are weak, appear strong.” –


348. “All warfare is based on deception.”


349. “Move not unless you see an advantage; use not your troops unless there is something to be gained; fight not unless the position is critical.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


350. “In the practical art of war, the best thing of all is to take the enemy’s country whole and intact; to shatter and destroy it is not so good.”


351. “All warfare is based on deception.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


352. “Treat your men as you would your own beloved sons. And they will follow you into the deepest valley.” Meaning


353. “Leadership is a matter of intelligence, trustworthiness, humaneness, courage, and sternness.”― Sun Tzu


354. “When strong, avoid them. If of high morale, depress them. Seem humble to fill them with conceit. If at ease, exhaust them. If united, separate them. Attack their weaknesses. Emerge to their surprise.” – Sun Tzu


355. Events in life mean nothing if you do not reflect on them in a deep way, and ideas from books are pointless if they have no application to life as you live it. 


356. “There is no instance of a nation benefitting from prolonged warfare”


357. “Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake.” 


358. “If you know the enemy and know yourself, your victory will not stand in doubt; if you know Heaven and know Earth, you may make your victory complete.”


359. “One mark of a great soldier is that he fights on his own terms or fights not at all.” – Sun Tzu


360. “The principle on which to manage an army is to set up one standard of courage which all must reach.”


361. “The greatest victory is that which requires no battle”


362. “Do not swallow bait offered by the enemy. Do not interfere with an army that is returning home.” — Sun Tzu


363. “Keep yourself restless and unsatisfied.”


364. “Your mind is the starting point of all war and all strategy. A mind that is easily overwhelmed by emotion, that is rooted in the past instead of the present, that cannot see the world with clarity and urgency, will create strategies that will always miss the mark.”


365. “Our successes and failures in life can be traced to how well or how badly we deal with the inevitable conflicts that confront us in society.”


366. “So in war, the way is to avoid what is strong and to strike at what is weak.”


367. “While we keep away from such places, we should get the enemy to approach them; while we face them, we should let the enemy have them on his rear.”


368. “Let your plans be dark and as impenetrable as night, and when you move, fall like a thunderbolt.” – Sun Tzu


369. “Correct your mistake as soon as you have found it.” – Sun Tzu


370. DECLARE WAR ON YOUR ENEMIES: THE POLARITY STRATEGY. Life is endless battle and conflict, and you cannot fight effectively unless you can identify your ...


371. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the acme of skill.” Meaning


372. “If you feel lost and confused, if you lose your sense of direction, if you cannot tell the difference between friend and foe, you have only yourself to blame.” 


373. “Hold out baits to entice the enemy. Feign disorder, and crush him.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


374. “In preparing for battle I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable.” 


375. “As Xenophon said, your obstacles are not rivers or mountains or other people; your obstacle is yourself.”


376. “In war, then, let your great object be victory, not lengthy campaigns.”


377. “When you surround an army, leave an outlet free. Do not press a desperate foe too hard.” 


378. “Events in life mean nothing if you do not reflect on them in a deep way, and ideas from books are pointless if they have no application to life as you live it.”


379. “Desperate people will risk anything in a fight. This gives them a huge advantage. They have nothing to lose.”


380. This provides you more to negotiate with and does not give your opponent time to regroup.


381. “It is your own bad strategies, not the unfair opponent, that are to blame for your failures. You are responsible for the good and bad in your life.”


382. “Every day you face battles—that is the reality for all creatures in their struggle to survive. But the greatest battle of all is with yourself—your weaknesses, your emotions, your lack of resolution in seeing things through to the end.” 


383. “The PEOPLE being regarded as the essential part of the State, and FOOD as the people’s heaven, is it not right that those in authority should value and be careful of both?” – Sun Tzu


384. Understand: your mind is weaker than your emotions. But you become aware of this weakness only in moments of adversity--precisely the time when you need strength. What best equips you to cope with tthe heat of battle is neither more knowledge nor more intellect. What makes your mind stronger, and more able to control your emotions, is internal discipline and toughness.No one can teach you this skill; you cannot learn it by reading about it. Like any discipline, it can come only through practice, experience, even a little suffering. The first step in building up presence of mind is to see the need for ii -- to want it badly enough to be willing to work for it. 


385. “Success in warfare is gained by carefully accommodating ourselves to the enemy’s purpose.”


386. “He will conquer who has learnt the artifice of deviation. Such is the art of maneuvering.”


387. “Let your plans be dark and impenetrable as night, and when you move, fall like a thunderbolt.”


388. “There are roads which must not be followed, armies which must not be attacked, towns which must not be besieged, positions which must not be contested, commands of the sovereign which must not be obeyed.”


389. “In attacking with fire, one should be prepared to meet five possible developments: (1) When fire breaks out inside to enemy’s camp, respond at once with an attack from without. (2) If there is an outbreak of fire, but the enemy’s soldiers remain quiet, bide your time and do not attack. (3) When the force of the flames has reached its height, follow it up with an attack, if that is practicable; if not, stay where you are. (4) If it is possible to make an assault with fire from without, do not wait for it to break out within, but deliver your attack at a favorable moment. (5) When you start a fire, be to windward of it. Do not attack from the leeward.”


390. “Peace proposals unaccompanied by a sworn covenant indicate a plot.”


391. “Let your plans be dark and impenetrable as night, and when you move, fall like a thunderbolt.” Meaning


392. “He will win who knows when to fight and when not to fight.”– Sun Tzu, The Art of War


393. Who does not know the evils of war cannot appreciate its benefits.”


394. “Keep your friends close, your enemies even closer.” – Sun Tzu


395. Everything in life can be taken away from you and generally will be at some point. Your wealth vanishes, the latest gadgetry suddenly becomes passé, your allies desert you. But if your mind is armed with the art of war, there is no power that can take that away. In the middle of a crisis, your mind will find its way to the right solution. Having superior strategies at your fingertips will give your maneuvers irresistible force. As Sun-tzu says, Being unconquerable lies with yourself. 


396. “We are not fit to lead an army on the march unless we are familiar with the face of the country—its mountains and forests, its pitfalls and precipices, its marshes and swamps.”


397. “If your enemy is secure at all points, be prepared for him. If he is in superior strength, evade him. If your opponent is temperamental, seek to irritate him. Pretend to be weak, that he may grow arrogant.” Meaning


398. “Victorious warriors win first and then go to war, while defeated warriors go to war first and then seek to win”


399. “First make yourself unbeatable, then go to war.” – Sun Tzu


400. Anger may in time change to gladness; vexation may be succeeded by content. But a kingdom that has once been destroyed can never come again into being; nor can the dead ever be brought back to life.”


401. “If words of command are not clear and distinct, if orders are not thoroughly understood, then the general is to blame. But, if orders are clear and the soldiers nevertheless disobey, then it is the fault of their officers.”


402. “By discovering the enemy’s dispositions and remaining invisible ourselves, we can keep our forces concentrated, while the enemy’s must be divided.”


403. “Knowing the place and the time of the coming battle, we may concentrate from the greatest distances in order to fight.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


404. “For them to perceive the advantage of defeating the enemy, they must also have their rewards.” – Sun Tzu


405. “Understand: your mind is weaker than your emotions. But you become aware of this weakness only in moments of adversity,precisely the time when


406. “So in war, the way is to avoid what is strong, and strike at what is weak.” – Sun Tzu


407. “Take time to deliberate, but when the time for action comes, stop thinking and go in.” 


408. “The best way to motivate people is not through reason but through emotion.”


409. “Appear weak when you are strong, and strong when you are weak.” – Sun Tzu


410. “If equally matched, we can offer battle; if slightly inferior in numbers, we can avoid the enemy; if quite unequal in every way, we can flee from him.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


411. “He will win who knows when to fight and when not to fight.” – Sun Tzu


412. He will win who, prepared himself, waits to take the enemy unprepared.


413. To secure ourselves against defeat lies in our own hands, but the opportunity of defeating the enemy is provided by the enemy himself.”


414. Once there, you do not need to attack or show your intentions. Slowly take over from within.


415. The general who advances without coveting fame and retreats without fearing disgrace, whose only thought is to protect his country and do good service for his sovereign, is the jewel of the kingdom.”


416. It is your own bad strategies, not the unfair opponent, that are to blame for your failures. You are responsible for the good and bad in your life. 


417. Use actions other than words, when needed, to make a lasting impression.


418. “As Xenophon said, your obstacles are not rivers or mountains or other people; your obstacle is yourself. If you feel lost and confused, if you lose your sense of direction, if you cannot tell the difference between friend and foe, you have only yourself to blame.” 


419. “You may advance and be absolutely irresistible, if you make for the enemy’s weak points; you may retire and be safe from pursuit if your movements are more


420. “Regard your soldiers as your children, and they will follow you into the deepest valleys; look upon them as your own beloved sons, and they will stand by you even unto death.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


421. “It is only one who is thoroughly acquainted with the evils of war that can thoroughly understand the profitable way of carrying it on.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


422. “Decide which fights to avoid and which are inevitable.”


423. Show your opponent's self-serving side. Show yourself as the underdog.


424. “Whoever is first in the field and awaits the coming of the enemy, will be fresh for the fight; whoever is second in the field and has to hasten to battle will arrive exhausted.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


425. “Rouse him, and learn the principle of his activity or inactivity. Force him to reveal himself, so as to find out his vulnerable spots.” 


426. “There are three ways in which a ruler can bring misfortune upon his army:— (1) By commanding the army to advance or to retreat, being ignorant of the fact that it cannot obey. This is called hobbling the army. (2) By attempting to govern an army in the same way as he administers a kingdom, being ignorant of the conditions which obtain in an army. This causes restlessness in the soldier’s minds. (3) By employing the officers of his army without discrimination, through ignorance of the military principle of adaptation to circumstances. This shakes the confidence of the soldiers.”


427. “If words of command are not clear and distinct, if orders are not thoroughly understood, the general is to blame. But if his orders are clear, and the soldiers nevertheless disobey, then it is the fault of their officers.”― Sun Tzu


428. “The good fighters of old first put themselves beyond the possibility of defeat, and then waited for an opportunity of defeating the enemy.”


429. “In the midst of chaos, there is also opportunity.” – Sun Tzu


430. “Appear weak when you are strong, and strong when you are weak” — Sun Tzu


431. If quick, I survive. If not quick, I am lost. This is death.”


432. “Treat your men as you would your own beloved sons. And they will follow you into the deepest valley.” – Sun Tzu


433. Understand their way of thinking.


434. “Everything in life can be taken away from you and generally will be at some point. Your wealth vanishes, the latest gadgetry suddenly becomes passé, your allies desert you.


435. “The skillful employer of men will employ the wise man, the brave man, the covetous man, and the stupid man.” – Sun Tzu


436. “There are five ways of attacking with fire. The first is to burn soldiers in their camp; the second is to burn stores; the third is to burn baggage trains; the fourth is to burn arsenals and magazines; the fifth is to hurl dropping fire amongst the enemy.”


437. When your army has crossed the border, you should burn your boats and bridges, in order to make it clear to everybody that you have no hankering after home.”


438. “When the general is weak and without authority; when his orders are not clear and distinct; when there are no fixed duties assigned to officers and men, and the ranks are formed in a slovenly haphazard manner, the result is utter disorganization.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


439. “Anger may in time change to gladness; vexation may be succeeded by content. But a kingdom that has once been destroyed can never come again into being; nor can the dead ever be brought back to life.”


440. “Even the finest sword plunged into salt water will eventually rust.” – Sun Tzu


441. “When you surround an army, leave an outlet free. Do not press a desperate foe too hard.” – Sun Tzu


442. If always calm be radical, if always radical do something ordinary.


443. “A clever general, therefore, avoids an army when its spirit is keen, but attacks it when it is sluggish and inclined to return.” — Sun Tzu


444. “The greatest battle of all is with yourself — your weaknesses, your emotions, your lack of resolution in seeing things through to the end. You must declare unceasing war on yourself.”


445. If the mind is willing, the flesh could go on and on without many things.”


446. “It is a military axiom not to advance uphill against the enemy, nor to oppose him when he comes downhill.”


447. “Attack is the secret of defense; defense is the planning of an attack.”


448. “One may know how to conquer without being able to do it.”


449. Focus on your ultimate goal and plot to reach it.


450. “The wise warrior avoids the battle.” – Sun Tzu


451. “Whoever is first in the field and awaits the coming of the enemy, will be fresh for the fight; whoever is second in the field and has to hasten to battle will arrive exhausted.”


452. “So in war, the way is to avoid what is strong, and strike at what is weak.”


453. “The victorious army is victorious first and seeks battle later; the defeated army seeks battle first and seeks victory later.”― Sun Tzu


454. “Instead of wasting time negotiating with every difficult person, work on spreading a spirit of camaraderie and efficiency that becomes self-policing. Streamline the organization, cutting out waste—in staff, in the irrelevant reports on your desk, in pointless meetings.” 


455. “The wise warrior avoids the battle.” Meaning


456. Let your plans be dark and impenetrable as night, and when you move, fall like a thunderbolt.”


457. “If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”


458. Convince your enemy that he will gain very little by attacking you; this will diminish his enthusiasm.”


459. “One may know how to conquer without being able to do it.” – Sun Tzu


460. “Look. I have a strategy. Why expect anything? If you don’t expect anything, you don’t get disappointed.” 


461. “If fighting is sure to result in victory, then you must fight, even though the ruler forbid it; if fighting will not result in victory, then you must not fight even at the ruler’s bidding.”


462. “Appear weak when you are strong, and strong when you are weak.” Meaning


463. Know your strengths and play to them. War consists of weakening the other side—militarily, financially and morally.


464. “Winning isn’t enough. The acme of all skill is to defeat your enemy before taking the field.” — Sun Tzu


465. “If your opponent is of choleric temper, seek to irritate him. Pretend to be weak, that he may grow arrogant.”― Sun Tzu


466. · Do not fight them.


467. “By means of water, an enemy may be intercepted, but not robbed of all his belongings.” 


468. “Strategic warriors operate much differently. They think ahead toward their long-term goals, decide which fights to avoid and which are inevitable, know how to control and channel their emotions. When forced to fight, they do so with indirection and subtle maneuver, making their manipulations hard to trace. In this way they can maintain the peaceful exterior so cherished in these political times.” 


469. “Understanding the world too well, you see too many options and become as indecisive as Hamlet.


470. “KEYS TO WARFARE The world is full of people looking for a secret formula for success and power. They do not want to think on their own; they just want a recipe to follow. They are attracted to the idea of strategy for that very reason. In their minds strategy is a series of steps to be followed toward a goal. They want these steps spelled out for them by an expert or a guru. Believing in the power of imitation, they want to know exactly what some great person has done before. Their maneuvers in life are as mechanical as their thinking. To separate yourself from such a crowd, you need to get rid of a common misconception: the essence of strategy is not to carry out a brilliant plan that proceeds in steps; it is to put yourself in situations where you have more options than the enemy does. Instead of grasping at Option A as the single right answer, true strategy is positioning yourself to be able to do A, B, or C depending on the circumstances. That is strategic depth of thinking, as opposed to formulaic thinking.” 


471. “Therefore soldiers must be treated in the first instance with humanity, but kept under control by means of iron discipline. This is a certain road to victory.”


472. “If you fight with all your might, there is a chance of life; where as death is certain if you cling to your corner.”


473. “No one can tell what is righteous and what is wrong, what is good and what is evil.” 


474. “who wishes to fight must first count the cost” 


475. “Knowledge of the enemy’s dispositions can only be obtained from other men. Hence the use of spies, of whom there are five classes: (1) Local spies; (2) inward spies; (3) converted spies; (4) doomed spies; (5) surviving spies.”


476. “Study the past if you would define the future.” 


477. “Your free speech won’t matter once the CBDC is fully integrated.”


478. “The height of strategy is to attack your opponent’s strategy.” – Sun Tzu


479. “Treat your men as you would your own beloved sons. And they will follow you into the deepest valley.”


480. Begin by seizing something which your opponent holds dear; then he will be amenable to your will.”


481. Rewards for good service should not be deferred a single day.”


482. “Thus it is that in war the victorious strategist only seeks battle after the victory has been won, whereas he who is destined to defeat first fights and afterwards looks for victory.”


483. “In respect of military method, we have, firstly, Measurement; secondly, Estimation of quantity; thirdly, Calculation; fourthly, Balancing of chances; fifthly, Victory.”


484. “The wise warrior avoids the battle.”


485. “Numerical weakness comes from having to prepare against possible attacks; numerical strength, from compelling our adversary to make these preparations against us.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


486. “Her voice trailed after any doctor who said no more tests could be done, stalked him down the corridor, sliced” 


487. “When you have success, be extra wary. When you are angry, take no action. When you are fearful, know you are going to exaggerate the dangers you face.” 


488. “A leader leads by example not by force.” — Sun Tzu


489. “When these five kinds of spy are all at work, none can discover the secret system. This is called ‘divine manipulation of the threads.’ It is the sovereign’s most


490. “Rewards for good service should not be deferred a single day.”


491. “There is no instance of a nation benefitting from prolonged warfare.” Meaning


492. “Opportunities multiply as they are seized.”


493. “Seem to work for the interests of others while furthering your own.”


494. “Your past successes are your biggest obstacle: every battle, every war, is different, and you cannot assume that what worked before will work today.”


495. “Move swift as the Wind and closely-formed as the Wood. Attack like the Fire and be still as the Mountain.”


496. “Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity.” — Robert J. Hanlon


497. “amid confusion and chaos, your array may be without head or tail, yet it will be proof against defeat.” Meaning


498. “The general who advances without coveting fame and retreats without fearing disgrace, whose only thought is to protect his country and do good service for his sovereign, is the jewel of the kingdom.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


499. To win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the acme of skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the acme of skill.”


500. “Energy may be likened to the bending of a crossbow; decision, to the releasing of the trigger.” – Sun Tzu


501. “Anger may in time change to gladness… But a kingdom that has once been destroyed can never come again into being”


502. “If it is to your advantage, make a forward move; if not, stay where you are.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


503. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every ...


504. “Think of the mind as a river: the faster it flows, the better it keeps up with the present and responds to change. The faster it flows, also the more it refreshes itself and the greater its energy. Obsessional thoughts, past experiences (whether traumas or


505. “To fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists in breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


506. “Understand: your mind is weaker than your emotions. But you become aware of this weakness only in moments of adversity--precisely the time when


507. But you become aware of this weakness only in moments of adversity—precisely the time when ...


508. “To secure ourselves against defeat lies in our own hands, but the opportunity of defeating the enemy is provided by the enemy himself.” – Sun Tzu


509. When one treats people with benevolence, justice, and righteousness, and reposes confidence in them, the army will be united in mind and all will be happy to serve their leaders.”


510. “We are not fit to lead an army on the march unless we are familiar with the face of the country—its mountains and forests, its pitfalls and precipices, its marshes and swamps.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


511. “Maneuvering with an army is advantageous; with an undisciplined multitude, most dangerous.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War


512. “Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much.” 


513. “If the enemy leaves a door open, you must rush in.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War

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