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450 Inspirational Blame Quotes: Stop Blaming Others (2023)

1. “Having authority implies accountability. If you reject the blame for failures under your watch, people reject your leadership.” — Rick Warren


2. “The most important quality I look for in a player is accountability. You’ve got to be accountable for who you are. It’s too easy to blame things on someone else” – Lenny Wilkins


3. Even though I’m disrespected, lied about, walked over, ignored, blamed, and hated, I’m still a proud stepmom.” – Anonymous


4. “The elimination diet: Remove anger, regret, resentment, guilt, blame, and worry. Then watch your health, and life, improve.” – Charles F. Glassman


5. “You are the reason of your own good-luck and bad-luck; success and failure; happiness and pain. Your choices are responsible for your present. Don’t blame someone else for your sufferings or failures.”


6. “You see, team,” Dan said passionately, “our problem is negativity, and we have no one to blame but ourselves. I believe where there is a void, negativity will fill it. And, unfortunately, within every organization you get voids in communication between leaders and their employees and between different teams and team members. It happens everywhere: with sports teams, work teams, family teams. Within these voids, negativity starts to breed and grow and, eventually, like a cancer it will spread if you don’t address it. As an executive team it’s up to us to do everything we can to prevent these voids from occurring and when they do occur, we must quickly fill them with positive communication and positive energy. People don’t just want to be seen and heard. They want to hear and see, and if they don’t feel like they are part of the company then they will assume the worst and act accordingly.”


7. “Discovering where love isn’t flowing in your life, helps manifest smoother pathways. Whom are you judging? Who are you angry with? Who do you blame? When you fill these spaces with love, and nonreaction, you set yourself free.”— Nerissa Marie


8. “A good leader takes a little more than his share of the blame, a little less than his share of the credit.” — Arnold Glasow


9. “A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit.”


10. “We cannot teach people to reset effectively when they’re on the ground. You cannot teach someone to reset when they’ve already fallen.” “The reason we blame, is a real need for control.”


11. “Just as a solid rock is not shaken by the storm, even so the wise are not affected by praise or blame.” — Buddha


12. “I stood before the group. “Whose fault was this?” I asked to the roomful of teammates. After a few moments of silence, the SEAL who had mistakenly engaged the Iraqi solider spoke up: “It was my fault. I should have positively identified my target.” “No,” I responded, “It wasn’t your fault. Whose fault was it?” I asked the group again. “It was my fault,” said the radioman from the sniper element. “I should have passed our position sooner.” “Wrong,” I responded. “It wasn’t your fault. Whose fault was it?” I asked again. “It was my fault,” said another SEAL, who was a combat advisor with the Iraqi Army clearance team. “I should have controlled the Iraqis and made sure they stayed in their sector.” “Negative,” I said. “You are not to blame.” More of my SEALs were ready to explain what they had done wrong and how it had contributed to the failure. But I had heard enough. “You know whose fault this is? You know who gets all the blame for this?” The entire group sat there in silence, including the CO, the CMC, and the investigating officer. No doubt they were wondering whom I would hold responsible. Finally, I took a deep breath and said, “There is only one person to blame for this: me. I am the commander. I am responsible for the entire operation. As the senior man, I am responsible for every action that takes place on the battlefield. There is no one to blame but me. And I will tell you this right now: I will make sure that nothing like this ever happens to us again.” It was a heavy burden to bear. But it was absolutely true. I was the leader. I was in charge and I was responsible. Thus, I had to take ownership of everything that went wrong. Despite the tremendous blow to my reputation and to my ego, it was the right thing to do—the only thing to do. I apologized to the wounded SEAL, explaining that it was my fault he was wounded and that we were all lucky he wasn’t dead. We then proceeded to go through the entire operation, piece by piece, identifying everything that happened and what we could do going forward to prevent it from happening again.”


13. People say children are a product of their upbringing. So, if people say I’m crazy can I just blame it on you? Let’s go with that plan. Happy birthday to my crazy like me mom!


14. “Extreme Ownership. Leaders must own everything in their world. There is no one else to blame.”


15. “Perfectionism is a self destructive and addictive belief system that fuels this primary thought: If I look perfect, and do everything perfectly, I can avoid or minimise the painful feelings of shame, judgment, and blame.”


16. Only you are responsible for your work. Making excuses is a waste of time. Stop it. The only one to blame is yourself.


17. “It was the same with our friends,” said Mae. “They come to pull back from us. There was talk about witchcraft. Black magic. Well, you can’t hardly blame them, but finally we had to leave the farm. We didn’t know where to go.”


18. If you realize that you’re the problem, then you can change yourself, learn something and grow wiser. Don’t blame other people for your problems.”


19. “Perfectionism is a shield that we carry with a thought process that says this, 'If I look perfect, live perfect, work perfect, and do it all perfectly, I can avoid or minimize feeling shame, blame, and judgement.”


20. “The culture of shame is driven by fear, blame, and disconnection, and it is often a powerful incubator for issues like perfectionism, stereotyping, gossiping, and addiction.”


21. “Each member of the team is critical to success, though the main effort and supporting efforts must be clearly identified. If the overall team fails, everyone fails, even if a specific member or an element within the team did their job successfully. Pointing fingers and placing blame on others contributes to further dissension between teams and individuals. These individuals and teams must instead find a way to work together, communicate with each other, and mutually support one another. The focus must always be on how to best accomplish the mission.”


22. “Bouncing hurt. Our ego is the part of us that cares about our status and what people think, about always being better than and always being right. I think of my ego as my inner hustler. It’s always telling me to compare, prove, please, perfect, outperform, and compete. Our inner hustlers have very little tolerance for discomfort or self-reflection. The ego doesn’t own stories or want to write new endings; it denies emotion and hates curiosity. Instead, the ego uses stories as armor and alibis. The ego has a shame-based fear of being ordinary (which is how I define narcissism). The ego says, “Feelings are for losers and weaklings.” Avoiding truth and vulnerability are critical parts of the hustle. Like all good hustlers, our egos employ crews of ruffians in case we don’t comply with their demands. Anger, blame, and avoidance are the ego’s bouncers. When we get too close to recognizing an experience as an emotional one, these three spring into action. It’s much easier to say, “I don’t give a damn,” than it is to say, “I’m hurt.” The ego likes blaming, finding fault, making excuses, inflicting payback, and lashing out, all of which are ultimate forms of self-protection. The ego is also a fan of avoidance—assuring the offender that we’re fine, pretending that it doesn’t matter, that we’re impervious. We adopt a pose of indifference or stoicism, or we deflect with humor and cynicism. Whatever. Who cares?”


23. “You can’t blame gravity for falling in love.” – Albert Einstein


24. “A serious problem with reactive language is that it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. People become reinforced in the paradigm that they are determined, and they produce evidence to support the belief. They feel increasingly victimized and out of control, not in charge of their life or their destiny. They blame outside forces—other people, circumstances, even the stars—for their own situation.”


25. “People expect to have stronger emotional reactions (including regret) to an outcome that’s produced by action than to the same outcome when it’s produced by inaction. This has been verified in the context of gambling: people expect to be happier if they gamble and win than if they refrain from gambling and get the same amount. The asymmetry is at least as strong for losers, and it applies to blame as well as to regret. The key isn’t the difference between commission and omission but the distinction between default options and actions that deviate from the default. When you deviate from the default, you can easily imagine the norm — and if the default is associated with bad consequences, the discrepancy between the two can be a source of painful emotions. The default option when you own a stock is not to sell it, but the default option when you meet your colleague in the am is to greet him. Selling a stock and failing to greet your coworker are both departures from the default option and natural candidates for regret or blame.”


26. No one is to blame for your future situation but yourself. If you want to be successful, then become Successful.”― Jaymin Shah


27. I pay no attention whatever to anybody’s praise or blame. I simply follow my own feelings.. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart


28. “The elders are looking for someone to blame. We will give them many someones.”


29. “As long as you try your best, you are never a failure. That is, unless you blame others.”


30. “People who blame others for their failures never overcome them. They simply move from problem to problem.”


31. “I am clumsy, drop glasses and get drunk on Monday afternoons. I read Seneca and can recite Shakespeare by heart, but I mess up the laundry, don’t answer my phone and blame the world when something goes wrong. I think I have a dream, but most of the days I’m still sleeping. The grass is cut. It smells like strawberries. Today I finished four books and cleaned my drawers.


32. “A good leader takes a little more than his share of the blame, a little less than his share of the credit.” – Arnold H. Glasow


33. “The best day of your life is the one on which you decide your life is your own. No apologies or excuses. No one to lean on. rely on. or blame. The gift is yours – it is an amazing journey – and you alone are responsible for the quality of it. This is the day your life really begins.” – Bob Moawad


34. “Don’t blame me for treating you like this. Because I’ll treat you the way you treat me.”


35. “If you do not believe in yourself. do not blame others for lacking faith in you.” – Brendan Francis


36. “A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit.” — John C. Maxwell


37. “Don’t blame God for not showering you with gifts. He gives you the gift of a new day with every single morning.”


38. “The best years of your life are the ones in which you decide your problems are your own. You do not blame them on your mother. the ecology. or the president. You realize that you control your own destiny.”


39. “If you trade your authenticity for safety, you may experience the following—anxiety, depression, eating disorders, addiction, rage, blame, resentment, and inexplicable grief.”


40. “Remember this: the way you interpret emotions, as well as the blame game you engage in, creates suffering, not the emotions themselves.”


41. “It is your own bad strategies, not the unfair opponent, that are to blame for your failures. You are responsible for the good and bad in your life.”


42. 27. “People with good emotional sobriety take responsibility for maintaining their own good mood. They don’t blame other people for the mood they are in and they don’t wait for someone else to change before they let themselves feel better. They know that like attracts like” – Tian Dayton Ph.D


43. “The moon is the queen of everything. She rules the oceans, rivers, rain. When I am asked whose tears these are; I always blame the moon. ” — Lucille Clifton


44. “It’s too easy to criticize a man when he’s out of favor, and to make him shoulder the blame for everybody else’s mistakes.” – Leo Tolstoy


45. “It's rare for a toxic person to change their behavior. More often, the only thing that varies is their target and the blame they place. Because some toxic people are difficult to identify, keep in mind that a victim mindset is sometimes a red flag. So, listen when someone talks about their life and circumstances. If the list of people they blame is long… it's probably only a matter of time before you're on that list.” – Steve Maraboli


46. ​“The man who smiles when things go wrong has thought of someone to blame it on.” - Robert Bloch


47. “No one is to blame for your future situation but yourself. If you want to be successful, then become “Successful.”― Jaymin Shah


48. "You can’t blame gravity for falling in love.” —Albert Einstein


49. The best thing about having a little sister is that I always had someone to blame my shenanigans on!


50. “Never blame your shortcomings on your personality. You’re not built that way; you are responsible of constantly rebuilding yourself and seeking perfection by finding your faults and overcoming them.” – Charbel Tadros


51. “If you realize that you're the problem, then you can change yourself, learn something and grow wiser. Don't blame other people for your problems.”


52. “Share the credit, take the blame, and quietly find out and fix things that went wrong. A psychotherapist who owned a school for severely troubled kids had a rule: “Whenever you place the cause of one of your actions outside yourself, it’s an excuse and not a reason.” This rule works for everybody, but it works especially for leaders.”


53. Pregnancy is when you are officially allowed to swear and curse at your husband and blame it all on hormones.


54. “Let us do our best whilst we live for another tomorrow is coming when whilst we are long gone, another group of people shall come to either suffer from our worst or enjoy and build upon our best. Let us run whole heatedly today with all alacrity for another generation shall come for the baton from our hands to either blame us or congratulate us on how we lived the dream and journeyed in life through the good and the bad times; another generation shall come to ponder over our footprints as a good or a bad lesson for them! Let us run with all necessary zeal such that when we hand over the baton, our next generation will have no reason but to soldier on with courage, enthusiasm and absolute commitment to get to the finishing line with a great accomplishment and a noble story worth pondering over and over!”


55. “i don't blame you for not knowing how to remain soft with me. sometimes i stay up thinking of all the places you are hurting which you'll never care to mention. i come from the same aching blood. from the same bone so desperate for attention i collapse in on myself. i am your daughter. i know the small talk is the only way you know how to tell me you love me. cause it is the only way i know how to tell you.”


56. “As the commander, everything that happened on the battlefield was my responsibility. Everything. If a supporting unit didn’t do what we needed it to do, then I hadn’t given clear instructions. If one of my machine gunners engaged targets outside his field of fire, then I had not ensured he understood where his field of fire was. If the enemy surprised us and hit us where we hadn’t expected, then I hadn’t thought through all the possibilities. No matter what, I could never blame other people when a mission went wrong.”


57. “In discovering the basic principle of the nature of man, Frankl described an accurate self-map from which he began to develop the first and most basic habit of a highly effective person in any environment, the habit of proactivity. While the word proactivity is now fairly common in management literature, it is a word you won’t find in most dictionaries. It means more than merely taking initiative. It means that as human beings, we are responsible for our own lives. Our behavior is a function of our decisions, not our conditions. We can subordinate feelings to values. We have the initiative and the responsibility to make things happen. Look at the word responsibility—“response-ability”—the ability to choose your response. Highly proactive people recognize that responsibility. They do not blame circumstances, conditions, or conditioning for their behavior. Their behavior is a product of their own conscious choice, based on values, rather than a product of their conditions, based on feeling.”


58. “A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit.” —John Maxwell, author, speaker, and pastor


59. “Boat Crew Six had become comfortable with substandard performance. Working under poor leadership and an unending cycle of blame, the team constantly failed. No one took ownership, assumed responsibility, or adopted a winning attitude.”


60. “You underestimate your own power so you don’t have to blame yourself for treating other people badly. You tell yourself stories about it. Oh well, Bobbi’s rich, Nick’s a man, I can’t hurt these people. If anything they’re out to hurt me and I’m defending myself.”


61. “Two people who were once very close can without blame or grand betrayal become strangers. Perhaps this is the saddest thing in the world.”


62. “The moon is queen of everything. She rules the oceans, rivers, rain. When I am asked whose tears these are; I always blame the moon.” – Lucille Clifton


63. Leaders must own everything in their world. There is no one else to blame.


64. “It is wrong to blame anyone for failing to forecast accurately in an unpredictable world. However, it seems fair to blame professionals for believing they can succeed in an impossible task.”


65. Narcissists tend to deny flaws in themselves and put the blame on others for their personal shortcomings, misfortunes and mistakes


66. “A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit.” –John Maxwell


67. ”A bad workman always blames his tools” – Unknown


68. "When we’re incomplete, we’re always searching for somebody to complete us. When, after a few years or a few months of a relationship, we find that we’re still unfulfilled, we blame our partners and take up with somebody more promising.” – Tom Robbins


69. “I find so many people struggling, often working harder, simply because they cling to old ideas. They want things to be the way they were; they resist change. I know people who are losing their jobs or their houses, and they blame technology or the


70. “A strong leader accepts blame and gives the credit. A weak leader gives blame and accepts the credit.” ~ John Wooden


71. “A strong leader accepts blame and gives credit


72. “He would hurt me and make the hurt my fault. So no matter who got hurt, I was to be blamed, always.”― Namrata Gupta


73. “The best leaders checked their egos, accepted blame, sought out constructive criticism, and took detailed notes for improvement.”


74. “I pay no attention whatever to anybody's praise or blame. I simply follow my own feelings.”


75. “Our unexpressed ideas, opinions, and contributions don’t just go away. They are likely to fester and eat away at our worthiness. I think we should be born with a warning label similar to the ones that come on cigarette packages: Caution: If you trade in your authenticity for safety, you may experience the following: anxiety, depression, eating disorders, addiction, rage, blame, resentment, and inexplicable grief.”


76. I don't blame you if you hate me. I wish you would. As long as I can still dream, I'll dream of you. -City of Lost Souls - Author: Cassandra Clare


77. “The elimination diet: Remove anger, regret, resentment, guilt, blame and worry. Then watch your health, and life, improve.”


78. You take your life in your own hands, and what happens? A terrible thing, no one to blame. –Erica Jong


79. Have fun on your birthday, but don’t get too crazy. Remember that you can’t blame your irresponsible behavior on “being in your 20s” anymore.


80. “It is the selfish parents who are to blame. Pay attention, be involved in your children’s lives. They are your legacy, your only hope.”


81. “Accomplishing a 20 Mile March, consistently, in good times and bad, builds confidence. Tangible achievement in the face of adversity reinforces the 10X perspective: we are ultimately responsible for improving performance. We never blame circumstance; we never blame the environment.”


82. “What does this word holiness really mean? Is it a negative kind of piety from which so many people have shied away? No, of course not! Holiness in the Bible means moral wholeness– a positive quality which actually includes kindness, mercy, purity, moral blamelessness and godliness. It is always to be thought of in a positive, white intensity of degree.” ~ Aiden Wilson Tozer


83. “Pregnancy is when you are officially allowed to swear and curse at your husband and blame it all on your hormones.”


84. To grow up is to stop putting blame on parents.


85. “If you realize that you’re the problem, then you can change yourself, learn something and grow wiser. Don’t blame other people for your problems.” – Robert Kiyosaki


86. Neither age nor experience matters when it comes to being personally accountable for any and all outcomes― no excuses whatsoever― be they positive or negative, nor shifting blame to other people or to external factors.


87. “Since an overseer manages God’s household, he must be blameless—not overbearing, not quick-tempered, not given to drunkenness, not violent, not pursuing dishonest gain. 8 Rather, he must be hospitable, one who loves what is good, who is self-controlled, upright, holy and disciplined. 9 He must hold firmly to the trustworthy message as it has been taught, so that he can encourage others by sound doctrine and refute those who oppose it.”


88. “We are prone to blame decision makers for good decisions that worked out badly and to give them too little credit for successful moves that appear obvious only after the fact.” ― Daniel Kahneman


89. “I had to take complete ownership of what went wrong. That is what a leader does — even if it means getting fired. If anyone was to be blamed and fired for what happened, let it be me.” – Jocko Willink


90. “I don't blame you one iota for feeling as you do. If I were you I would undoubtedly feel just as you do."(...) You can say that and be 100 percent sincere, because if you were the other person you, of course, would feel just as he does (...) Suppose you had inherited the same body and temperament and mind (...) Suppose you had had his environment and experiences. You would then be precisely what he was - and where he was. For it is those things -and only those things - that made him what he was. (...) You deserve very little credit for being what you are - and remember, the people who come to you irritated, bigoted, unreasoning, deserve very little discredit for being what they are.”


91. "You can't blame gravity for falling in love.” ― Albert Einstein


92. “I pay no attention whatever to anybody’s praise or blame. I simply follow my own feelings.” —Mozart


93. “An afternoon drive from Los Angeles will take you up into the high mountains, where eagles circle above the forests and the cold blue lakes, or out over the Mojave Desert, with its weird vegetation and immense vistas. Not very far away are Death Valley, and Yosemite, and Sequoia Forest with its giant trees which were growing long before the Parthenon was built; they are the oldest living things in the world. One should visit such places often, and be conscious, in the midst of the city, of their surrounding presence. For this is the real nature of California and the secret of its fascination; this untamed, undomesticated, aloof, prehistoric landscape which relentlessly reminds the traveller of his human condition and the circumstances of his tenure upon the earth. “You are perfectly welcome,” it tells him, “during your short visit. Everything is at your disposal. Only, I must warn you, if things go wrong, don’t blame me. I accept no responsibility. I am not part of your neurosis. Don’t cry to me for safety. There is no home here. There is no security in your mansions or your fortresses, your family vaults or your banks or your double beds. Understand this fact, and you will be free. Accept it, and you will be happy.” — Christopher Isherwood


94. “Having authority implies accountability. If you reject the blame for failures under your watch, people reject your leadership.” ~ Rick Warren


95. Sunrise and sunset are my two favourite times of day. Can you blame me?


96. I never blame myself when I’m not hitting. I just blame the bat, and if it keeps up, I change bats. – Yogi Berra


97. “The truth is messy. It’s raw and uncomfortable. You can’t blame people for preferring lies.” – Holly Black


98. “The pride of man hopes but to blame God for the evils of the world, and to praise himself for the good.”


99. “The children of blame are cynicism and hopelessness. When we succumb to believing that we are victims of our circumstances and yield to the plight of determinism, we lose hope, we lose drive, and we settle into resignation and stagnation.”


100. “If you realize that you’re the problem, then you can change yourself, learn something and grow wiser. Don’t blame other people for your problems.” ~ Robert Kiyosaki


101. “When people are lame, they love to blame.”


102. “If you trade your authenticity for safety. you may experience the following: anxiety. depression. eating disorders. addiction. rage. blame. resentment. and inexplicable grief.”


103. The hero isn't the one who is right, but the one who steps forward to take the blame—deserved or not—and apologize to save a relationship. – Richelle E. Goodrich


104. “Leaders inspire accountability through their ability to accept responsibility before they place blame.”― Courtney Lynch


105. “There is no one else to blame. The leader must acknowledge mistakes and admit failures, take ownership of them, and develop a plan to win.”


106. “Don’t blame your parents, don’t blame your boyfriend, don’t blame the weather. Accept the reality, embrace the challenge, and deal with it. Be in charge of your own life. Turn negatives into positives and be proud to be a woman.” ~Diane Von Furstenberg


107. “If you trade your authenticity for safety. you may experience the following: anxiety. depression. eating disorders. addiction. rage. blame. resentment. and inexplicable grief.” – Brene Brown


108. Shame, blame, disrespect, betrayal, and the withholding of affection damage the roots from which love grows. Love can only survive these injuries if they are acknowledged, healed and rare. ” ― Brené Brown


109. “If someone gets angry at a Nice Guy or points out some flaw or mistake, his shame will be triggered. In an attempt to distract himself and the other person from his “badness” he may try to turn the tables and do something to trigger the other person’s shame. I call this shame dumping. This unconscious strategy is based on the belief that if the Nice Guy can shift the focus to the other person’s badness, he can slip out of the spotlight. Typical shame dumping techniques include blame, bringing up the past, deflection, and pointing out the other person’s flaws.”—Robert A. Glover


110. “The best day of your life is the one on which you decide your life is your own. No apologies or excuses. No one to lean on, rely on, or blame. The gift is yours — it is an amazing journey — and you alone are responsible for the quality of it. This is the day your life really begins.” —Bob Moawad


111. “Leaders inspire accountability through their ability to accept responsibility before they place blame.” –Courtney Lynch


112. “On any team, in any organization, all responsibility for success and failure rests with the leader. The leader must own everything in his or her world. There is no one else to blame. The leader must acknowledge mistakes and admit failures, take ownership of them, and develop a plan to win.”


113. “Teamwork means never having to take all the blame yourself.” — Stephen Hawking


114. Don’t blame the distractions, Improve your focus.


115. “A man can fail many times, but he isn’t a failure until he begins to blame somebody else.” – John Burroughs


116. I pay no attention whatever to anybody's praise or blame. I simply follow my own feelings. - Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart


117. “Perfectionism is not the same thing has striving to be your best. Perfectionism is the belief that if we live perfect, look perfect, and act perfect, we can minimize or avoid the pain of blame, judgement, and shame. It’s a shield. It’s a twenty-ton shield that we lug around thinking it will protect us when, in fact, it’s the thing that’s really preventing us from flight.”


118. “A media diet of hostility, blame, confrontation and violence corrodes your civic outlook.”


119. “I’ve been burdened with blame trapped in the past for too long, I’m moving on.” – Rascal Flatts


120. “You underestimate your own power so you don’t have to blame yourself for treating other people badly.”


121. If your everyday life seems poor, don't blame it; blame yourself; admit to yourself that you are not enough of a poet to call forth its riches - Author: Rainer Maria Rilke


122. Stepmothers are more self-critical and blame themselves more than any other members of a remarried family. They tend to experience difficulty with a stepchild as ongoing, unremitting, and overwhelming.” – Wednesday Martin


123. I love my company When there’s no one else to blame. On my own I’m free, to do things as I please. I like myself, I’m not a narcissist. I enjoy my own company


124. “Highly proactive people don’t blame circumstances, conditions or conditioning for their behavior. Their behavior is their own conscious choice.”


125. “In essence, the optimistic style involves taking credit for successes but little blame for failures.”


126. Faced with the inescapable fact that human existence is mad, random and pointless, one in eight of them crack up and go stark slavering buggo! Who can blame them? In a world as psychotic as this...any other response would be crazy!. — Batman: The Killing Joke


127. You are the only one responsible for your own decisions. When you make a mistake, don’t deflect blame and acknowledge it. This will help you become more effective; it is the most difficult but important thing to do because it is what separates people who succeed at work from those who do not.


128. "No one is to blame for your future situation but yourself. If you want to be successful, then become"Successful.”― Jaymin Shah


129. You can’t blame gravity for falling in love. ―Albert Einstein


130. Everything is my fault, I’ll take all the blame.


131. “You have to let it go. You can hold on to the hate and the love and even the bitterness, but you have to go of the blame. The blame is what’s tearing you down, babe. – Sky”


132. “A good leader takes a little more than his share of the blame, a little less than his share of the credit.” ― Arnold H. GlasowLeadership quote


133. “Relationship with a narcissist in a nutshell: You will go from being the perfect love of their life, to nothing you do is ever good enough. You will give your everything and they will take it all and give you less and less in return. You will end up depleted, emotionally, mentally, spiritually, and probably financially, and then get blamed for it.” ~ Bree Bonchay


134. “I pay no attention whatever to anybody’s praise or blame. I simply follow my own feelings.” ― Mozart


135. “Learning to have patience and not forcing the relationship is part of twin soul process. If you are trying to force your will onto other person, chances are you’re not ready to really connect yourself. There should be no blame here – only deep and unconditional love.” – Chimnese Davids


136. “The leader must own everything in his or her world. There is no one else to blame.”


137. “When you blame others, you give up your power to change.”


138. “He sketches you as the antagonist and suddenly his transgressions become deleted scenes. He blames you for his sadness. And this is how the wolf cries boy.”


139. Never blame others for your mistakes.


140. “God, help me to tell the thruth to the strong and to avoid telling lies to get the weak's applause. If you give me success, do not take away my humility. If you give me humility, do not take away my dignity. God, help me to see the other side of the medal. Don't let me blame others of treason just because they don't think they like me. God, teach me to love people as I love myself and to judge me as I judge others. Please, don't let me be proud if I succed, or fall in despair if I fall. Remind me that failure is the experience that precedes triumph. Teach me that forgiving is the most important in the strong and that revenge is the most primitive sigh in the weak. If you take away my success, let me keep my strength to succeed from failure. If I fall people, give me courage to apologize and if people fail me, give me courage to forgive them. God, if I forget you, please do not forget me.”


141. “The best years of your life are the ones in which you decide your problems are your own. You do not blame them on your mother, the ecology, or the president. You realize that you control your own destiny.”


142. A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit. — John Maxwell


143. Leaders inspire accountability through their ability to accept responsibility before they place blame.


144. “Being generous, just helping one’s relatives and being blameless in one’s actions; this is the best good luck.”- Buddha ( Heartless Selfish Quotes )


145. “It is your own bad strategies, not the unfair opponent, that are to blame for your failures.”


146. A boss creates fear, a leader confidence. A boss fixes blame, a leader corrects mistakes. A boss knows all, a leader asks questions. — Russel Ewing


147. “Those whose efforts have produced a poor result often have a lengthy list of reasons to justify their poor progress. To them the items on the list are not excuses, they are reasons. They blame the company or they blame the boss. They blame taxes. They blame their parents or the teachers or the system. Sometimes they even blame the country.”


148. “The moon is the queen of everything. She rules the oceans, rivers, rain. When I am asked whose tears these are; I always blame the moon.” — Lucille Clifton


149. “You must not blame me if I do talk to the clouds.” – Henry Thoreau


150. “A good leader takes a little more than his share of the blame, a little less than his share of the credit.” –Arnold Glasow


151. “To be a good human being is to have a kind of openness to the world, an ability to trust uncertain things beyond your own control, that can lead you to be shattered in very extreme circumstances for which you were not to blame. ” — Martha Nussbaum


152. "Everything is my fault, I’ll take all the blame.” – Nirvana


153. “Perfectionism is a self-destructive and addictive belief system that fuels this primary thought: If I look perfect, and do everything perfectly, I can avoid or minimize the painful feelings of shame, judgment, and blame.”


154. “How can we resent the life we’ve created for ourselves? Who’s to blame, who’s to credit, but us? Who can change it, any time we wish, but us? “ ~ Richard Bach


155. “To grow up is to stop putting blame on parents”


156. I want you to know that I somehow did manage to fit all your birthday candles on your cake. What? I inherited my sassiness from you, so you can only blame yourself. Happy birthday to my old but amazing mom!


157. “Shame. blame. disrespect. betrayal. and the withholding of affection damage the roots from which love grows. Love can only survive these injuries if they are acknowledged. healed and rare.”


158. “If you realize that you’re the problem, then you can change yourself, learn something and grow wiser. Don’t blame other people for your problems.”


159. “In any chain of command, the leadership must always present a united front to the troops. A public display of discontent or disagreement with the chain of command undermines the authority of leaders at all levels. This is catastrophic to the performance of any organization. As a leader, if you don’t understand why decisions are being made, requests denied, or support allocated elsewhere, you must ask those questions up the chain. Then, once understood, you can pass that understanding down to your team. Leaders in any chain of command will not always agree. But at the end of the day, once the debate on a particular course of action is over and the boss has made a decision—even if that decision is one you argued against—you must execute the plan as if it were your own. When leading up the chain of command, use caution and respect. But remember, if your leader is not giving the support you need, don’t blame him or her. Instead, reexamine what you can do to better clarify, educate, influence, or convince that person to give you what you need in order to win. The major factors to be aware of when leading up and down the chain of command are these: • Take responsibility for leading everyone in your world, subordinates and superiors alike. • If someone isn’t doing what you want or need them to do, look in the mirror first and determine what you can do to better enable this. • Don’t ask your leader what you should do, tell them what you are going to do.”


160. “I had to take complete ownership of what went wrong. That is what a leader does — even if it means getting fired. If anyone was to be blamed and fired for what happened, let it be me.”


161. “All responsibility for success and failure rests with the leader. The leader must own everything in his or her world, there's no one else to blame. The leader must acknowledge mistakes, and admit failures. Take ownership of them, and develop a plan to win.”


162. “Perfectionism is not abut healthy achievement and growth. Perfectionism is the belief that if we live perfect, look perfect, and act perfect, we can minimize or avoid the pain of blame, judgement, and shame. It's a shield.”


163. “Neither age nor experience matters when it comes to being personally accountable for any and all outcomes—no excuses whatsoever—be they positive or negative, nor shifting blame to other people or to external factors.” –Kory Livingstone, “Quiet Determination”


164. “Eventually, he couldn’t hide it from her any longer and he had to come clean. She was nothing but supportive and there’s no blame or anger on her side – just love, care and determination to get through this together,” a source told Us Weekly exclusively in October 2020. “Her heart aches for Dax after what he went through with his dad, and she’s beyond proud of him for turning his life around whilst openly addressing his demons head-on.”


165. “And this is my prayer: that your love may abound more and more in knowledge and depth of insight, so that you may be able to discern what is best and may be pure and blameless for the day of Christ. (Phil. 1:9–10, emphasis added)”


166. “If your boss isn’t making a decision in a timely manner or providing necessary support for you and your team, don’t blame the boss. First, blame yourself. Examine.”


167. “When subordinates aren’t doing what they should, leaders that exercise Extreme Ownership cannot blame the subordinates. They must first look in the mirror at themselves. The leader bears full responsibility for explaining the strategic mission, developing the tactics, and securing the training and resources to enable the team to properly and successfully execute. If an individual on the team is not performing at the level required for the team to succeed, the leader must train and mentor that underperformer. But if the underperformer continually fails to meet standards, then a leader who exercises Extreme Ownership must be loyal to the team and the mission above any individual. If underperformers cannot improve, the leader must make the tough call to terminate them and hire others who can get the job done. It is all on the leader.”


168. Let your feelings flow freely, accept each one of them, know that they are your feelings and no one is to blame for them. Live from your essence and watch your feelings flow; only when you accept them can you understand the story of your life. - Author: Patricia Selbert


169. “You try every trick in the book to keep her. You write her letters. You drive her to work. You quote Neruda. You compose a mass e-mail disowning all your sucias. You block their e-mails. You change your phone number. You stop drinking. You stop smoking. You claim you’re a sex addict and start attending meetings. You blame your father. You blame your mother. You blame the patriarchy. You blame Santo Domingo. You find a therapist. You cancel your Facebook. You give her the passwords to all your e-mail accounts. You start taking salsa classes like you always swore you would so that the two of you could dance together. You claim that you were sick, you claim that you were weak—It was the book! It was the pressure!—and every hour like clockwork you say that you’re so so sorry. You try it all, but one day she will simply sit up in bed and say, No more, and, Ya, and you will have to move from the Harlem apartment that you two have shared. You consider not going. You consider a squat protest. In fact, you say won’t go. But in the end you do.”


170. “People with good emotional sobriety take responsibility for maintaining their own good mood. They don’t blame other people for the mood they are in and they don’t wait for someone else to change before they let themselves feel better. They know that like attracts like” – Tian Dayton Ph.D


171. “If you trade your authenticity for safety, you may experience the following: anxiety, depression, eating disorders, addiction, rage, blame, resentment, and inexplicable grief.” — Brené Brown


172. “The best day of your life is the one on which you decide your life is your own. No apologies or excuses. No one to lean on, rely on, or blame. The gift is yours – it is an amazing journey – and you alone are responsible for the quality of it. This is the day your life really begins.”


173. “I used to blame everything outside of me for my lack of progress until I found that my problem was inside.” ~ Jim Rohn


174. “Ah, babies! They’re more than just adorable little creatures on whom you can blame your farts.”– Tina Fey


175. “The dream doesn’t lie in victimization or blame; it lies in hard work, determination and a good education.” – Alphonso Jackson


176. The best day of your life is the one on which you decide your life is your own. No apologies or excuses. No one to lean on, rely on, or blame. The gift is yours – it is an amazing journey – and you alone are responsible for the quality of it. This is the day your life really begins. – Bob Moawad


177. “Passin’ up on my old ways, I can’t blame you, no, no.” – Drake


178. “When takers talk about mistakes, they’re usually quick to place the blame on other people. Givers are more likely to say, ‘Here’s the mistake I made; I learned the following from it. Here are the steps I’m taking to make sure I don’t let people down in the future.'”


179. “When we're incomplete. we're always searching for somebody to complete us. When. after a few years or a few months of a relationship. we find that we're still unfulfilled. we blame our partners and take up with somebody more promising. This can go on and on--series polygamy--until we admit that while a partner can add sweet dimensions to our lives. we. each of us. are responsible for our own fulfillment. Nobody else can provide it for us. and to believe otherwise is to delude ourselves dangerously and to program for eventual failure every relationship we enter.”


180. “In any chain of command, the leadership must always present a united front to the troops. A public display of discontent or disagreement with the chain of command undermines the authority of leaders at all levels. This is catastrophic to the performance of any organization. As a leader, if you don’t understand why decisions are being made, requests denied, or support allocated elsewhere, you must ask those questions up the chain. Then, once understood, you can pass that understanding down to your team. Leaders in any chain of command will not always agree. But at the end of the day, once the debate on a particular course of action is over and the boss has made a decision—even if that decision is one you argued against—you must execute the plan as if it were your own. When leading up the chain of command, use caution and respect. But remember, if your leader is not giving the support you need, don’t blame him or her. Instead, reexamine what you can do to better clarify, educate, influence, or convince that person to give you what you need in order to win. The major factors to be aware of when leading up and down the chain of command are these: • Take responsibility for leading everyone in your world, subordinates and superiors alike. • If someone isn’t doing what you want or need them to do, look in the mirror first and determine what you can do to better enable this. • Don’t ask your leader what you should do, tell them what you are going to do. APPLICATION TO BUSINESS “Corporate doesn’t understand what’s going on out here,” said the field manager. “Whatever experience those guys had in the field from years ago, they have long forgotten. They just don’t get what we are dealing with, and their questions and second-guessing prevents me and my team from getting the job done.” The infamous they. I was on a visit to a client company’s field leadership team, the frontline troops that executed the company’s mission. This was where the rubber met the road: all the corporate capital initiatives, strategic planning sessions, and allocated resources were geared to support this team here on the ground. How the frontline troops executed the mission would ultimately mean success or failure for the entire company. The field manager’s team was geographically separated from their corporate headquarters located hundreds of miles away. He was clearly frustrated. The field manager had a job to do, and he was angry at the questions and scrutiny from afar. For every task his team undertook he was required to submit substantial paperwork. In his mind, it made for a lot more work than necessary and detracted from his team’s focus and ability to execute. I listened and allowed him to vent for several minutes. “I’ve been in your shoes,” I said. “I used to get frustrated as hell at my chain of command when we were in Iraq. They”


181. “As long as you try your best, you are never a failure. That is, unless you blame others.”


182. “When leading up the chain of command, use caution and respect. But remember, if your leader is not giving the support you need, don’t blame him or her. Instead, reexamine what you can do to better clarify, educate, influence, or convince that person to give you what you need in order to win.”


183. “You are solely responsible for your success and your failure. As long as you blame others for the reason you aren't where you want to be, you will always be a failure.” - Erin Cummings


184. “Shame, blame, disrespect, betrayal, and the withholding of affection damage the roots from which love grows. Love can only survive these injuries if they are acknowledged, healed and rare.” — Brené Brown


185. “Do not let previous conflicts get entangled with the present. You will only find it more difficult to communicate clearly and assess both you and your peer’s issues accurately if you keep bringing up issues that happened in the past. Holding grudges and placing blames will only clutter your mind and put a strain on your emotions.” – John Ward


186. “There’s nothing more unattractive than a man who blames predestination for his own failures and a woman who blames men for her own vulnerability. Blame thyself.” – Sanhita Baruah


187. “Shame, blame, disrespect, betrayal, and the withholding of affection damage the roots from which love grows.”


188. “A strong secure leader accepts blame and gives credit. A weak insecure leader gives blame and takes credit.” - John Wooden, Basketball Coach


189. The man who smiles when things go wrong has thought of someone to blame it on.


190. “Do everything without grumbling and arguing so that you may be blameless and pure, innocent children of God surrounded by people who are crooked and corrupt. Among these people you shine like stars in the world.”


191. “A man may fail many times but he isn’t a failure until he begins to blame somebody else.”


192. The good thing about getting old is that you can blame everything on your age.


193. “It makes one a better person to have had hardships and to have overcome hardships and not to blame anybody else for your mistakes.” – Maureen Forrester


194. “Extreme ownership. Leaders must own everything in their world. There is no one else to blame.” – Jocko Willink


195. “Shame, blame, disrespect, betrayal, and the withholding of affection damage the roots from which love grows. Love can only survive these injuries if they are acknowledged, healed, and rare.”


196. “You can’t blame these kids for not being thankful or satisfied with what they have. Their mentality eludes them from the reality.”


197. “The best day of your life is the one on which you decide your life is your own. No apologies or excuses. No one to lean on, rely on, or blame. The gift is yours – it is an amazing journey – and you alone are responsible for the quality of it. This is the day your life really begins.” – Bob Moawad


198. “It was so much easier to blame it on Them. It was bleakly depressing to think that They were Us. If it was Them, then nothing was anyone’s fault. If it was us, what did that make Me? After all, I’m one of Us. I must be. I’ve certainly never thought of myself as one of Them. No one ever thinks of themselves as one of Them. We’re always one of Us. It’s Them that do the bad things.” ~ Terry Pratchett


199. “In any chain of command, the leadership must always present a united front to the troops. A public display of discontent or disagreement with the chain of command undermines the authority of leaders at all levels. This is catastrophic to the performance of any organization. As a leader, if you don’t understand why decisions are being made, requests denied, or support allocated elsewhere, you must ask those questions up the chain. Then, once understood, you can pass that understanding down to your team. Leaders in any chain of command will not always agree. But at the end of the day, once the debate on a particular course of action is over and the boss has made a decision—even if that decision is one you argued against—you must execute the plan as if it were your own. When leading up the chain of command, use caution and respect. But remember, if your leader is not giving the support you need, don’t blame him or her. Instead, reexamine what you can do to better clarify, educate, influence, or convince that person to give you what you need in order to win. The major factors to be aware of when leading up and down the chain of command are these: • Take responsibility for leading everyone in your world, subordinates and superiors alike. • If someone isn’t doing what you want or need them to do, look in the mirror first and determine what you can do to better enable this. • Don’t ask your leader what you should do, tell them what you are going to do. APPLICATION TO BUSINESS “Corporate doesn’t understand what’s going on out here,” said the field manager. “Whatever experience those guys had in the field from years ago, they have long forgotten. They just don’t get what we are dealing with, and their questions and second-guessing prevents me and my team from getting the job done.” The infamous they. I was on a visit to a client company’s field leadership team, the frontline troops that executed the company’s mission. This was where the rubber met the road: all the corporate capital initiatives, strategic planning sessions, and allocated resources were geared to support this team here on the ground. How the frontline troops executed the mission would ultimately mean success or failure for the entire company. The field manager’s team was geographically separated from their corporate headquarters located hundreds of miles away. He was clearly frustrated. The field manager had a job to do, and he was angry at the questions and scrutiny from afar. For every task his team undertook he was required to submit substantial paperwork. In his mind, it made for a lot more work than necessary and detracted from his team’s focus and ability to execute. I listened and allowed him to vent for several minutes. “I’ve been in your shoes,” I said. “I used to get frustrated as hell at my chain of command when we were in Iraq. They”


200. “Leaders must own everything in their world. There is no one else to blame.” – Jocko Willink


201. There was only one person to blame for the confusion, only one person to blame for the wounded men, and only one person to blame for the dead Iraqi soldier. And I knew exactly who that person was.


202. “Perhaps he’ll try—but I have a feeling he’ll kill Amarantha first. That’s what it all boils down to, anyway: even your servitude to me can be blamed on her. So he’ll kill her tomorrow, and I’ll be free before he can start a fight with me that will reduce our once-sacred mountain to rubble.” He picked at his nails. “And I have a few other cards to play.”


203. “Our egos don’t like to take blame.”


204. “Don’t blame God for not showering you with gifts. He gives you the gift of a new day with every single morning. Good morning.”


205. “If you get your ego in your way, you will only look to other people and circumstances to blame.” – Jocko Willink


206. No mother is a walking needle and if you don’t feel the razor on your skin, go ahead and blame it on the stories that you’ve heard about mothers.


207. People blame me for being foolish. I said I am not foolish but in true love no one can convince me to leave.


208. Don’t blame God for not showering you with gifts. He gives you the gift of a new day with every single morning.


209. ‘I don't believe in astrology. The only stars I can blame for my failures are those that walk about the stage.’


210. “You underestimate your own power so you don’t have to blame yourself for treating other people badly. You tell yourself stories about it. Oh”


211. “Today (and everyday) take responsibility for your words and actions. Do not blame others for the choices that you make.”


212. You take your life in your own hands, and what happens? A terrible thing, no one to blame. -Erica Jong


213. “While some commanders took full responsibility for blue-on-blue, others blamed their subordinates for simulated fratricide incidents in training. These weaker commanders would get a solid explanation about the burden of command and the deep meaning of responsibility: the leader is truly and ultimately responsible for everything.”


214. When life is sad, you blame. When it is happy, you take credit.


215. “At the board meeting, the VP did just that. He took the blame for the failure to meet the manufacturing objectives and gave a solid no-nonsense list of corrective measures that he would implement to ensure execution. The list started with what he was going to do differently, not about what other people needed to do. Now, the VP was”


216. “Are you willing to push the right buttons even if it means being perceived as the villain? … I’d rather be perceived as a winner than a good teammate. I wish they both went hand in hand all the time but that’s just not reality… I have nothing in common with lazy people who blame others for their lack of success.” — Kobe Bryant


217. “There is no one else to blame. The leader must acknowledge mistakes and admit failures, take ownership of them, and develop a plan to win.” – Jocko Willink


218. “Just as a mighty boulder stirs not with the wind, so the wise are never moved either by praise or blame. ” – The Dhammapada


219. You must not blame me If I do talk to the sky.


220. “People who blame others for their failures never overcome them. They simply move from problem to problem.”


221. A good leader takes a little more than his share of the blame, a little less than his share of the credit. – Arnold H. Glasow


222. “To hold someone accountable is to care about them enough to risk having them blame you for pointing out their deficiencies.”


223. I never blame myself when I'm not hitting. I just blame the bat, and if it keeps up, I change bats. — Yogi Berra.


224. “I think it is a bad relationship when you get blamed for the things that make you who you are.” – Unknown


225. “As a leader employing Extreme Ownership, if your team isn’t doing what you need them to do, you first have to look at yourself. Rather than blame them for not seeing the strategic picture, you must figure out a way to better communicate it to them in terms that are simple, clear, and concise, so that they understand. This is what leading down the chain of command is all about.”


226. “Lame people blame people.” – Dan Lok


227. “The book derives its title from the underlying principle — the mind-set — that provides the foundation for all the rest: Extreme Ownership. Leaders must own everything in their world. There is no one else to blame.” – Jocko Willink


228. “Extreme ownership. Leaders must own everything in their world. There is no one else to blame.” – Jocko Willink


229. “I have nothing in common with lazy people who blame others for their lack of success. Great things come from hard work and perseverance. No excuses. ”


230. “My attitude is a result of your actions, so if you don’t like my attitude, blame yourself!”


231. “It’s too easy to criticize a man when he’s out of favor, and to make him shoulder the blame for everybody else’s mistakes.” –Leo Tolstoy


232. “When another blames you or hates you, or people voice similar criticisms, go to their souls, penetrate inside and see what sort of people they are. You will realize that there is no need to be racked with anxiety that they should hold any particular opinion about you.”


233. “There is no doubt that I’m in love with you. There is no blame that I fell in love with you. It does not matter whether you are here or far away; all I know is that you belong to me and I am in love with you!”


234. “On the maturity continuum, dependence is the paradigm of you—you take care of me; you come through for me; you didn’t come through; I blame you for the results. Independence is the paradigm of I—I can do it; I am responsible; I am self-reliant; I can choose. Interdependence is the paradigm of we—we can do it; we can cooperate; we can combine our talents and abilities and create something greater together.”


235. As I go through this incredible pregnancy journey, my mood swings are at their peak. So don’t blame me if I’m odd and mean to you. It’s all for the sake of the lovely pregnancy!


236. “Leaders must own everything in their world. There is no one else to blame.”


237. “Ownership: ‘A commitment of the head, heart, and hands to fix the problem and never again affix the blame.”


238. “Do not blame your own problem on your children.” – Anonymous


239. “If you trade your authenticity for safety, you may experience the following: anxiety, depression, eating disorders, addiction, rage, blame, resentment, and inexplicable grief.” -- Brené Brown


240. “I pay no attention whatever to anybody's praise or blame. I simply follow my own feelings.” – Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart


241. “Ah, babies! They’re more than just adorable little creatures on whom you can blame your farts.”—Tina Fey


242. “Relationship with a narcissist in a nutshell: You will go from being the perfect love of their life to nothing you do is ever good enough. You will give everything and they will take it all and give you less and less in return. You will end up depleted, emotionally, mentally, spiritually, and probably financially, and then get blamed for it.” — Bree Bonchay


243. “If your boss isn’t making a decision in a timely manner or providing necessary support for you and your team, don’t blame the boss. First, blame yourself. Examine what you can do to better convey the critical information for decisions to be made and support allocated.”


244. “Ironically, it was the regent himself who was indirectly to blame for this, for it was the education he had afforded me that had caused me to reject such traditional customs”


245. “When people are lame, they love to blame.” – Robert Kiyosaki


246. “You still love me? I don’t blame you! If I were you, I’d still love me.”


247. “I pay no attention whatsoever to anybody’s praise or blame. I simply follow my own feelings.” — Mozart


248. “It’s counterintuitive,” I said. “It’s natural for anyone in a leadership position to blame subordinate leaders and direct reports when something goes wrong. Our egos don’t like to take blame. But it’s on us as leaders to see where we failed to communicate effectively and help our troops clearly understand what their roles and responsibilities are and how their actions impact the bigger strategic picture. “Remember, it’s not about you,” I continued. “It’s not about the drilling superintendent. It’s about the mission and how best to accomplish it. With that attitude exemplified in you and your key leaders, your team will dominate.”


249. “Do everything without grumbling and arguing so that you may be blameless and pure, innocent children of God surrounded by people who are crooked and corrupt. Among these people you shine like stars in the world.”


250. “The moon is the queen of everything. She rules the oceans, rivers, rain. When I am asked whose tears these are; I always blame the moon.“


251. “You’ve got to be accountable for who you are. It’s too easy to blame things on someone else” – Lenny Wilkins


252. #101 “If you think the other woman caused the break of your marriage you would be wrong. If there is a marriage and your husband loves you, there is no other woman. Put the blame where it deserves to be – on him!”


253. “There is only one person to blame for this: me. I am the commander. I am responsible for the entire operation. As the senior man, I am responsible for every action that takes place on the battlefield. There is no one to blame but me. And I will tell you this right now: I will make sure that nothing like this ever happens to us again.”


254. “Two people who were once very close can without blame or grand betrayal become strangers. Perhaps this is the saddest thing in the world.” — Warsan Shire


255. “You can’t blame gravity for falling in love.”


256. “Look at the word responsibility—“response-ability”—the ability to choose your response. Highly proactive people recognize that responsibility. They do not blame circumstances, conditions, or conditioning for their behavior.”


257. “Poor people blame others for their misfortunes, rich people, we take responsibility for our own failures.” – Dan Lok


258. “Of the many exceptional leaders we served alongside throughout our military careers, the consistent attribute that made them great was that they took absolute ownership—Extreme Ownership—not just of those things for which they were responsible, but for everything that impacted their mission. These leaders cast no blame. They made no excuses. Instead of complaining about challenges or setbacks, they developed solutions and solved problems. They leveraged assets, relationships, and resources to get the job done. Their own egos took a back seat to the mission and their troops. These leaders truly led.”


259. “Once you take the time to consider the other person's perspective, you will become sympathetic to his feel ins and ideas. You will be able to authentically and honestly say, "I don't blame you for feeling as you do. If I were in your position, I would feel just as you do.”


260. “When takers talk about mistakes, they're usually quick to place the blame on other people. Givers are more likely to say 'Here's the mistake I made; I learned the following from it. Here are the steps I'm taking to make sure I don't let people down in the future.'”


261. “It’s natural for anyone in a leadership position to blame subordinate leaders and direct reports when something goes wrong. Our egos don’t like to take blame. But it’s on us as leaders to see where we failed to communicate effectively and help our troops clearly understand what their roles and responsibilities are and how their actions impact the bigger strategic picture. “Remember, it’s not about you,” I continued. “It’s not about the drilling superintendent. It’s about the mission and how best to accomplish it. With that attitude exemplified in you and your key leaders, your team will dominate.”


262. “Your life is the fruit of your own doing. You have no one to blame but yourself.”


263. “What behaviors are rewarded? Punished? Where and how are people actually spending their resources (time, money, attention)? What rules and expectations are followed, enforced, and ignored? Do people feel safe and supported talking about how they feel and asking for what they need? What are the sacred cows? Who is most likely to tip them? Who stands the cows back up? What stories are legend and what values do they convey? What happens when someone fails, disappoints, or makes a mistake? How is vulnerability (uncertainty, risk, and emotional exposure) perceived? How prevalent are shame and blame and how are they showing up? What’s the collective tolerance for discomfort? Is the discomfort of learning, trying new things, and giving and receiving feedback normalized, or is there a high premium put on comfort (and how does that look)?”


264. “The world feels high lonesome and heartbroken to me right now. We’ve sorted ourselves into factions based on our politics and ideology. We’ve turned away from one another and toward blame and rage. We’re lonely and untethered. And scared. So damn scared.”


265. Criticism isn’t good because it puts people on defensive mode, and people find it easy to blame someone rather than take responsibility, which makes you lazier.


266. “There is nothing spiritual about a marriage that uses guilt, blame, shame or religious manipulations to keep a relationship together. ” – Shannon L. Alder


267. “I used to blame everything outside of me for my lack of progress until I found that my problem was inside.” Jim Rohn


268. “Love: We cultivate love when we allow our most vulnerable and powerful selves to be deeply seen and known, and when we honor the spiritual connection that grows from that offering with trust, respect, kindness, and affection. Love is not something we give or get; it is something that we nurture and grow, a connection that can only be cultivated between two people when it exists within each one of them—we can only love others as much as we love ourselves. Shame, blame, disrespect, betrayal, and the withholding of affection damage the roots from which love grows. Love can only survive these injuries if they are acknowledged, healed, and rare.”


269. "The hero isn’t the one who is right, but the one who steps forward to take the blame – deserved or not – and apologize to save a relationship.” – Richelle E. Goodrich


270. “A strong leader accepts blame and gives credit. A weak leader gives blame and accepts the credit.” – John Wooden


271. “I do not encourage you to blame your parents. We are all victims of victims, and they could not teach you something that they did not know. If your mother or father did not know how to love themselves, it would have been impossible for them to teach you how to love yourself. They were coping as best they could with the information they had. Think for a minute about how they were raised. If you want to understand your parents more, I suggest that you ask them about their childhoods.”—Louise Hay


272. “Organizations will also find themselves at a crossroads when their leaders start to believe their own myths—that the success the company enjoyed under their leadership was a result of their genius rather than the genius of their people, who were inspired by the Cause they were leading. These leaders too often fixate on advancing their own fame, fortunes, glory and legacies at the expense of the company and its Cause. Management becomes disconnected from the people and trust breaks down. And when performance necessarily starts to suffer as a result, these same leaders are quicker to blame others than to look at what set the company on the new path in the first place. In order to “fix” the problem, their faith in the people is replaced with faith in the process. The company becomes more rigid and decision-making powers are often taken away from the front lines. It can’t be a good thing when the captain of the ship, who is supposed to be on deck navigating toward the horizon, is now in the ship tinkering with the engine trying to make it go faster.”


273. Be a strong leader and learn to give credits to others and take the blame on yourself.


274. “I have to remind myself that not everyone else is to blame for how I feel. That my emotions do what they do and it’s not just because someone else made me feel that way. I try to stop where I am and look around myself before reacting.” — Sarah Bleckman


275. “Of the many exceptional leaders we served alongside throughout our military careers, the consistent attribute that made them great was that they took absolute ownership—Extreme Ownership—not just of those things for which they were responsible, but for everything that impacted their mission. These leaders cast no blame. They made no excuses. Instead of complaining about challenges or setbacks, they developed solutions”


276. “A good leader takes a little more than his share of the blame, a little less than his share of the credit.” – Arnold Glasow


277. “You can’t blame these kids for not being thankful or satisfied with what they have. Their mentality eludes them from the reality. ” ― Thisuri Wanniarachchi


278. “If you get your ego in your way, you will only look to other people and circumstances to blame.”~Jocko Willink


279. “I’ve been burdened with blame, trapped in the past for too long / I’m moving on. ” —Rascal Flatts, musicians, in “I’m Movin’ On”


280. “Extreme ownership. Leaders must own everything in their world. There is no one else to blame.”


281. “The man who smiles when things go wrong has thought of someone to blame it on.” – Robert Bloch


282. “To grow up is to stop putting blame on parents”


283. “If you were to ask me what one subject, one theme, one point, seemed to have the greatest impact upon people – what one great idea resonated deeper in the soul than any other – if you were to ask what one ideal was most practical, most relevant, most timely, regardless of circumstances, I would answer quickly, without any reservation, and with the deepest conviction of my heart and soul, that we are free to choose. This power and freedom stand in stark contrast to the mind-set of victimise and culture of blame so prevalent in society today. Fundamentally, we are a product of choice, not nature (genes) or nurture (upbringing, environment). Certainly genes and culture often influence very powerfully, but they do not determine.”


284. Thanks for always letting me lay the blame on you, little sis! Happy birthday.


285. “If you make it a habit not to blame others, you will fell the growth of the ability to love in your soul, and you will see the growth of goodness in your life.” Leo Tolstoy


286. Ah, babies! They're more than just adorable little creatures on whom you can blame your farts.. – Tina Fey


287. #11. A solid rock is not disturbed by the wind; even so, a wise person is not agitated by praise or blame. – Dhammapada


288. A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit.


289. “I think a great entrepreneur is learning every day. An entrepreneur is somebody that doesn’t take no for an answer — they’re going to figure something out. They also take responsibility. They don’t blame anybody else. And they’re dreamers in one sense but they’re also realistic and they take affordable steps when they can.”


290. “We are not to blame for our illness, but we are responsible for our health.” Victoria Maxwell


291. I’m convinced that about half of what separates the successful entrepreneurs from the non-successful ones is pure perseverance. It is so hard. You put so much of your life into this thing. There are such rough moments in time that I think most people give up. I don’t blame them. It’s really tough and it consumes your life. If you’ve got a family and you’re in the early days of a company, I can’t imagine how one could do it. I’m sure it’s been done but it’s rough. It’s pretty much an 18-hour day job, seven days a week for a while. Unless you have a lot of passion about this, you’re not going. to survive.


292. “Most people who don’t feel content with their lives don’t know the reason why. Often they suspect that circumstances or other people are to blame. Even honest and self-aware individuals who know the problem lies inside of them still may have trouble getting to the root of the issue. They ask themselves, “Why am I this way?” They desire to change, but they don’t do anything differently so that they can change. They merely hope things will turn out all right—and they become frustrated when they don’t. Recognize that only when you make the right changes to your thinking do other things begin to turn out right in your life.”


293. We’ve all been there. It’s easy to blame someone else to justify our actions at work. Being accountable for the things we do and say can be hard, but it makes us better teammates in the long run.


294. “I find so many people struggling today, often working harder, simply because they cling to old ideas. They want things to be the way they were, and they resist change. I know people who are losing their jobs or their houses, and they blame technology or the economy or their boss. Sadly, they fail to realize that they might be the problem. Old ideas are their biggest liability. It is a liability simply because they fail to realize that while that idea or way of doing something was an asset yesterday, yesterday is gone.”


295. “We are prone to blame decision makers for good decisions that worked out badly and to give them too little credit for successful moves that appear obvious only after the fact.”


296. “You can’t blame gravity for falling in love.” —Albert Einstein


297. “The children of blame are cynicism and hopelessness.”


298. “PRINCIPLE: LEADING UP THE CHAIN If your boss isn’t making a decision in a timely manner or providing necessary support for you and your team, don’t blame the boss. First, blame yourself. Examine what you can do to better convey the critical information for decisions to be made and support allocated.”


299. “Not all compulsive liars suffer from a psychiatric illness. They commonly lie to gain admiration, popularity, control, and the ability to manipulate others to compensate for low self-esteem. They seek to disguise failure by making others feel responsible or by casting the blame on someone else.” – Gini Graham Scott


300. “Perfectionism is a self destructive and addictive belief system that fuels this primary thought: If I look perfect, and do everything perfectly, I can avoid or minimise the painful feelings of shame, judgment, and blame.” – Brené Brown


301. “The truth is messy. It's raw and uncomfortable. You can't blame people for preferring lies.”


302. “I praise loudly; I blame softly.”


303. “if your team isn’t doing what you need them to do, you first have to look at yourself. Rather than blame them for not seeing the strategic picture, you must figure out a way to better communicate it to them in terms that are simple, clear, and concise, so that they understand. This”


304. “I used to blame everything outside of me for my lack of progress until I found that my problem was inside.” Jim Rohn


305. “When we aren't curious in conversations we judge, tell, blame and even shame, often without even knowing it, which leads to conflict."


306. “The elimination diet: Remove anger, regret, resentment, guilt, blame and worry. Then watch your health, and life, improve.” ~ Charles Glassman


307. “I think we should be born with a warning label similar to the ones that come on cigarette packages: Caution: If you trade in your authenticity for safety, you may experience the following: anxiety, depression, eating disorders, addiction, rage, blame, resentment, and inexplicable grief.”


308. “It’s too easy to criticize a man when he’s out of favor, and to make him shoulder the blame for everybody else’s mistakes.” –Leo Tolstoy


309. “You take your life in your own hands, and what happens? A terrible thing, no one to blame.”


310. “serious problem with reactive language is that it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. People become reinforced in the paradigm that they are determined, and they produce evidence to support the belief. They feel increasingly victimized and out of control, not in charge of their life or their destiny. They blame outside forces—other people, circumstances, even the stars—for their own situation.”


311. “A strong leader accepts blame and gives the credit. A weak leader gives blame and accepts the credit.”


312. “If you trade your authenticity for safety, you may experience the following: anxiety, depression, eating disorders, addiction, rage, blame, resentment, and inexplicable grief.”


313. “You can’t blame gravity for falling in love.”- Albert Einstein


314. “Politics is a great, albeit painful, example of social contract disengagement. Politicians on both sides of the aisle are making laws that they’re not required to follow or that don’t affect them, they’re engaging in behaviors that would result in most of us getting fired, divorced, or arrested. They’re espousing values that are rarely displayed in their behavior. And just watching them shame and blame each other is degrading for us. They’re not living up to their side of the social contract and voter turnout statistics show that we’re disengaging.”


315. “Can’t blame me for my trust issue.”


316. "You can’t blame gravity for falling in love.” – Albert Einstein


317. “We are slipping back from the age of reason into the mire of mystery, into a world of gods and devils, ghouls and angels. The difference this time is that we have chosen ignorance over knowledge, vapidity over insight, folly over realism. Consequently, we only have ourselves to blame when the rich and powerful take advantage of us.”


318. “No matter how obvious his or her failing, or how valid the criticism, a Tortured Genius, in this sense, accepts zero responsibility for mistakes, makes excuses, and blames everyone else for their failings (and those of their team). In their mind, the rest of the world just can’t see or appreciate the genius in what they are doing. An individual with a Tortured Genius mind-set can have catastrophic impact on a team’s performance.”


319. “Neither age nor experience matters when it comes to being personally accountable for any and all outcomes- no excuses whatsoever- be they positive or negative, nor shifting blame to other people or to external factors.” – Kory Livingstone


320. “Perfectionism is a self-destructive and addictive belief system that fuels this primary thought: If I look perfect. and do everything perfectly. I can avoid or minimize the painful feelings of shame. judgment. and blame.”


321. “Toxic people create chaos, point fingers, shift blame and avoid taking responsibility.” – Dr. Anne Brown RNMS


322. “the greatest inspiration for institutional change in American law enforcement came on an airport tarmac in Jacksonville, Florida, on October 4, 1971. The United States was experiencing an epidemic of airline hijackings at the time; there were five in one three-day period in 1970. It was in that charged atmosphere that an unhinged man named George Giffe Jr. hijacked a chartered plane out of Nashville, Tennessee, planning to head to the Bahamas. By the time the incident was over, Giffe had murdered two hostages—his estranged wife and the pilot—and killed himself to boot. But this time the blame didn’t fall on the hijacker; instead, it fell squarely on the FBI. Two hostages had managed to convince Giffe to let them go on the tarmac in Jacksonville, where they’d stopped to refuel. But the agents had gotten impatient and shot out the engine. And that had pushed Giffe to the nuclear option. In fact, the blame placed on the FBI was so strong that when the pilot’s wife and Giffe’s daughter filed a wrongful death suit alleging FBI negligence, the courts agreed. In the landmark Downs v. United States decision of 1975, the U.S. Court of Appeals wrote that “there was a better suited alternative to protecting the hostages’ well-being,” and said that the FBI had turned “what had been a successful ‘waiting game,’ during which two persons safely left the plane, into a ‘shooting match’ that left three persons dead.” The court concluded that “a reasonable attempt at negotiations must be made prior to a tactical intervention.” The Downs hijacking case came to epitomize everything not to do in a crisis situation, and inspired the development of today’s theories, training, and techniques for hostage negotiations. Soon after the Giffe tragedy, the New York City Police Department (NYPD) became the first police force in the country to put together a dedicated team of specialists to design a process and handle crisis negotiations. The FBI and others followed. A new era of negotiation had begun. HEART”


323. “If a seed of a lettuce will not grow, we do not blame the lettuce. Instead, the fault lies with us for not having nourished the seed properly.”


324. She rules the oceans, rivers, rain. When I am asked whose tears these are; I always blame the moon.” – Lucille Clifton


325. This is true for the addicts, alcoholics and their loved ones. As the partner of an addict, you too play an important role in the recovery process. Some days you may struggle and feel as though your partner is not making as much headway as you would like. It is important to maintain healthy boundaries during this time. Avoiding criticizing them or pushing them to progress faster. Also, do not blame yourself. There are many ways in which you can offer support, while avoiding codependency. Allow your loved one to take ownership over their sobriety and recognize their small victories. Recovery is a continuous journey and some days will be harder than others, but do not stop.


326. “On any team, in any organization, all responsibility for success and failure rests with the leader. The leader must own everything in his or her world. There is no one else to blame. The leader must acknowledge mistakes and admit failures,”


327. “A good leader takes a little more than his share of the blame, a little less than his share of the credit.”- Arnold H. Glasgow


328. “the way you interpret emotions, as well as the blame game you engage in, creates suffering, not the emotions themselves.”


329. “Look at the word responsibility—“response-ability”—the ability to choose your response. Highly proactive people recognize that responsibility. They do not blame circumstances, conditions, or conditioning for their behavior. Their behavior is a product of their own conscious choice, based on values, rather than a product of their conditions, based on feeling.”


330. “The book derives its title from the underlying principle—the mind-set—that provides the foundation for all the rest: Extreme Ownership. Leaders must own everything in their world. There is no one else to blame.”


331. This last week has been a little hell for both of us simply because I didn't understand my own feelings. And because I can't understand them, I blame her for provoking in me feelings that make my world seem suddenly unsafe. - Author: Paulo Coelho


332. “When a bad SEAL leader walked into a debrief and blamed everyone else, that attitude was picked up by subordinates and team members, who then followed suit. They all blamed everyone else, and inevitably the team was ineffective and unable to properly execute a plan. Continuing, I told the VP, “In those situations, you ended up with a unit that never felt they were to blame for anything. All they did was make excuses and ultimately never made the adjustments necessary to fix problems. Now, compare that to the commander who came in and took the blame. He said, ‘My subordinate leaders made bad calls; I must not have explained the overall intent well enough.’ Or, ‘The assault force didn’t execute the way I envisioned; I need to make sure they better understand my intent and rehearse more thoroughly.’ The good leaders took ownership of the mistakes and shortfalls. That’s the key difference.”


333. “Perfectionism is a self-destructive and addictive belief system that fuels this primary thought—if I look perfect, and do everything perfectly, I can avoid or minimize the painful feelings of shame, judgment, and blame.”


334. “Shame, blame, disrespect, betrayal, and the withholding of affection damage the roots from which love grows. Love can only survive these injuries if they are acknowledged, healed, and rare.” – Brene Brow


335. “when someone is not leading you, then you lead them. You pick up the slack for their weakness. My leader doesn’t want to come up with a plan? That’s okay. I will. My leader doesn’t want to give a brief? That’s fine. I will. My leader doesn’t want to mentor the younger troops? That’s okay. I will do it. My leader doesn’t want to take the blame when something goes wrong? That’s fine with me. I’m going to take the blame. And you have to think about that one. That one can be tricky because you think to yourself, “If I take the blame, I’m going to look bad. I’m going to look bad in front of the team and in front of the more senior boss—my weak boss’s boss.” But think about it from a leader’s perspective. Let’s say the mission was a failure, and the boss comes in to find out what happened. Listen to the way this situation plays out: I’m the guy that was in charge of the mission and I say, “Sorry, boss, we failed. But it wasn’t my fault. It was his fault,” and I point the finger at someone else. Now imagine that the guy I pointed the finger at says, “Yes. It was my fault. Here’s what happened. Here are the mistakes I made. And here is what I am going to do to fix the situation next time.” Who does the senior boss respect more? The guy who blamed someone or the guy who took responsibility—the guy that took ownership? Of course, it is the guy that takes ownership of”


336. “He was the master of being “proactive,” and much to our vexation while growing up, we were never allowed to make excuses or blame our circumstances, friends, or teachers for our problems. We were simply taught to “make it happen” or “choose another response.”


337. “At the end of the day, you are solely responsible for your success and your failure. And the sooner you realize that, you accept that, and integrate that into your work ethic, you will start being successful. As long as you blame others for the reason you aren’t where you want to be, you will always be a failure.” – Erin Cummings


338. “Often, when smaller teams within the team get so focused on their immediate tasks, they forget about what others are doing or how they depend on other teams. They may start to compete with one another, and when there are obstacles, animosity and blame develops. This creates friction that inhibits the overall team’s performance. It falls on leaders to continually keep perspective on the strategic mission and remind the team that they are part of the greater team and the strategic mission is paramount.”


339. Narcissists tend to deny flaws in themselves and put the blame on others for their personal shortcomings, misfortunes and mistakes


340. “In our own case we accept excuses too easily; in other people’s we do not accept them easily enough. As regards my own sins it is a safe bet (though not a certainty) that the excuses are not really so good as I think; as regards other men’s sins against me it is a safe bet (though not a certainty) that the excuses are better than I think. One must therefore begin by attending to everything which may show that the other man was not so much to blame as we thought.”


341. “The elimination diet: Remove anger, regret, resentment, guilt, blame and worry. Then watch your health, and life, improve.” -- Charles Glassman


342. “The elimination diet: Remove anger, regret, resentment, guilt, blame and worry. Then watch your health, and life, improve.” — Charles Glassman


343. “Wouldn’t you like to have a magic phrase that would stop arguments, eliminate ill feeling, create good will, and make the other person listen attentively? Yes? All right. Here it is: “I don’t blame you one iota for feeling as you do. If I were you I would undoubtedly feel just as you do.”


344. “Maybe he just likes to act passive so he didn't have to take the blame for anything”


345. It is effortless to criticize, condemn and complain about things, but a great character understands every situation and doesn’t criticize or blame others for it.


346. “As a mountain of rock is unshaken by wind. so also. the wise are unperturbed by blame or by praise.” – The Dhammapada


347. People who lie to themselves about investing are the same as overweight people who blame their genes for their obesity.” – Robert Kiyosaki


348. “Forgiveness is a radical act of setting your soul free, and the person you blame, hate, fear, or resent cannot help you with that. Only your heart holds the key. ” ― Anthon St. Maarten


349. “A good leader takes a little more than his share of the blame, a little less than his share of the credit.” – Arnold Glasow, humorist and author


350. “Stay away from and never be one! People who mess with your mind. People who twist facts to blame it on you. People who punish you by doing things that upsets you. People who never apologize. Stay away from those fake people.” – Unknown


351. “An upset is our maker’s way of telling us that we need to learn something. It is a tap on our shoulder saying, ‘Pay attention. You have something important to learn. If you lie, blame, justify, or deny the upset, you waste the upset and will waste a precious gem of wisdom..”


352. 27. “People with good emotional sobriety take responsibility for maintaining their own good mood. They don’t blame other people for the mood they are in and they don’t wait for someone else to change before they let themselves feel better. They know that like attracts like” – Tian Dayton Ph.D


353. “any team, in any organization, all responsibility for success and failure rests with the leader. The leader must own everything in his or her world. There is no one else to blame. The leader must acknowledge mistakes and admit failures, take ownership of them, and develop a plan to win.”


354. “then blame them for the problems we had as an organization.”


355. “You can’t blame gravity for falling in love.” — Albert Einstein


356. “Shame, blame, disrespect, betrayal, and the withholding of affection damage the roots from which love grows. Love can only survive these injuries if they are acknowledged, healed, and rare.” – Brene Brown


357. “My loneliness was born when men praised my talkative faults and blamed my silent virtues.” ― Khalil Gibran


358. You can't blame gravity for falling in love.


359. “Just as a solid rock is not shaken by the storm. even so the wise are not affected by praise or blame.” – The Buddha (Dhammapada)


360. A narcissist think they have the right to mistreat and hurt you, but you don’t have the right to react and stan up for yourself. They are allowed to criticize, voice all their opinions, be rude, cruel and insensitive, but how dare you point out their bad behavior or say something back to them. Their behaviors suddenly become all your fault and you are crazy a drama queen and a horrible person for yourself and not accepting and tolerating their crap. They never blame themselves or see their own horrific behavior


361. “Too many of us are addicted to our problems. Instead of letting go, we complain, we play the victim, we blame other people, or we discuss our issues without doing anything to solve them. To reduce this mental suffering, we must refuse to interpret our emotions in a negative and disempowering way.”


362. “Highly proactive people don’t blame circumstances, conditions or conditioning for their behavior. Their behavior of their own conscious choice.” Stephen Covey


363. The hero isn’t the right one, but the one who steps forward to take the blame, deserved or not, and apologize to save a relationship. – Richelle E. Goodrich


364. “You must not blame me if I do talk to the clouds.” — Henry Thoreau


365. “Leaders inspire accountability through their ability to accept responsibility before they place blame.”


366. “A strong leader accepts blame and gives the credit. A weak leader gives blame and accepts the credit.” – John Wooden


367. “Stepmothers are more self-critical and blame themselves more than any other members of a remarried family. They tend to experience difficulty with a stepchild as ongoing, unremitting and overwhelming.” ―Wednesday Martin


368. “I pay no attention to anybody’s praise or blame. I simply follow my own feelings.” – Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart


369. “Ah, babies! They’re more than just adorable little creatures on whom you can blame your farts.” – Tina Fey


370. “If you trade your authenticity for safety, you may experience the following: anxiety, depression, eating disorders, addiction, rage, blame, resentment, and inexplicable grief.” – Brené Brown


371. “You must not blame me if I do talk to the clouds.”– Henry Thoreau


372. “You can’t blame gravity for falling in love.“ -Albert Einstein


373. No one is to blame for your future situation but yourself. If you want to be successful, then become “Successful”.


374. “It is in the healing of self-blame and judgement. that the self is liberated from the constraints of binding emotions...And you come to remember your true authentic self." © 2015 W.E. Slater”


375. “Having a spiritual relationship with yourself isn’t always about feeling happy-go-lucky with every situation in your life. Or always being your own upbeat cheer squad. It’s about honouring your darker aspects, accepting your taunting fears and being willing to forgive yourself and others. Until we release the need to block out shame, blame, terror, emptiness and lack we create a wall where it’s hard to see where we want to go, what truly makes us happy, and the smoothest pathway to peace.”—Nerissa Marie


376. “Don’t blame your parents, don’t blame your boyfriend, don’t blame the weather. Accept the reality, embrace the challenge, and deal with it. Be in charge of your own life. Turn negatives into positives and be proud to be a woman.” – Diane Von Furstenberg, CEO and fashion designer


377. “The boss drives his workers; the leader coaches them. The boss depends on authority; the leader on goodwill. The boss inspires fear; the leader inspires enthusiasm. The boss says “I”; the leader, “we.” The boss fixes the blame for the breakdown; the leader fixes the breakdown. The boss knows how it is done; the leader shows how. The boss says, “Go”; the leader says, “Let’s go!”


378. “Don’t blame yourself. Let me do it!”


379. “A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit.” - John C. Maxwell


380. Leaders inspire accountability through their ability to accept responsibility before they place blame.― Courtney Lynch


381. Many blame themselves for not being where they want to in life. If you are in a dysfunctional relationship, you may feel like it is impossible for things to get better. If you are struggling with alcoholism or addiction, sobriety may feel like it is thousands of miles away. If you are dealing with both, you may feel even more hopeless. It is easy to get caught up in negative thought patterns or to feel like you aren’t capable of leading a healthy, addiction-free life like those around you. But focusing on those discouraging thoughts only prevent you from moving forward.


382. If you get your ego in your way, you will only look to other people and circumstances to blame.


383. “A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit.” – John C. Maxwell


384. “Black Girls… Stop settling for less than what you deserve. That’s why I stress self-love! There comes a time when you can no longer blame a man. You’ve got to hold yourself accountable for the choices that you make. Choose wisely! Slow down. Pay attention. Don’t allow his good looks and swag to blind you from the truth. Don’t be so easily flattered by money, cars, jewelry, and all of that other stuff. Your heart and well-being is worth much more than that. Choose someone who respects, loves, and adores you. Somebody who has your best interest at heart. Nothing less! Allow yourself to experience REAL love. Stop giving your love, time, and attention to men who clearly don’t deserve it. #ItsAllUpToYou


385. “It is wrong to blame anyone for failing to forecast accurately in an unpredictable world. However, it seems fair to blame professionals for believing they can succeed in an impossible task. Claims”


386. “The team will function more effectively when it has leaders and team members who refuse to blame their teammates.” –Mike Smith


387. “serious problem with reactive language is that it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. People become reinforced in the paradigm that they are determined, and they produce evidence to support the belief. They feel increasingly victimized and out of control, not in charge of their life or their destiny. They blame outside forces—other people, circumstances, even the stars—for their own situation.”


388. A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit. – John Maxwell


389. “Ah, babies! They’re more than just adorable little creatures on whom you can blame your farts.” — Tina Fey


390. “On the maturity continuum, dependence is the paradigm of you—you take care of me; you come through for me; you didn’t come through; I blame you for the results. Independence is the paradigm of I—I can do it; I am responsible; I am self-reliant; I can choose. Interdependence is the paradigm of we—we can do it; we can cooperate; we can combine our talents and abilities and create something greater together. Dependent people need others to get what they want. Independent people can get what they want through their own effort. Interdependent people combine their own efforts with the efforts of others to achieve their greatest success.”


391. “Do you feel guilty? You should. You're to blame for my smile this morning. Yep, guilty as charged.”


392. Having authority implies accountability. If you reject the blame for failures under your watch, people reject your leadership.


393. “No one is to blame for your future situation but yourself. If you want to be successful, then become ‘Successful.’” ―Jaymin Shah


394. “When we're incomplete, we're always searching for somebody to complete us. When, after a few years or a few months of a relationship, we find that we're still unfulfilled, we blame our partners and take up with somebody more promising.


395. “A man may fail many times but he isn’t a failure until he begins to blame somebody else.” – John Burroughs


396. “I find that when a person makes a mistake or fails, if he or she always complains or blames others, that person will never come back from the failure. But if the person checks inside, this person has hope.”


397. “Perfectionism is a self destructive and addictive belief system that fuels this primary thought: If I look perfect, and do everything perfectly, I can avoid or minimize the painful feelings of shame, judgment, and blame.”


398. “A good leader takes a little more than his share of the blame, a little less than his share of the credit.” —Arnold H. Glasow


399. “If mistakes happen, effective leaders don’t place blame on others. They take ownership of the mistakes, determine what went wrong, develop solutions to correct those mistakes and prevent them from happening again as they move forward.”


400. “A good leader takes a little more than his share of the blame, a little less than his share of the credit.” ~ Arnold H. Glasow


401. “The great liability of the engineer compared to men of other professions is that his works are out in the open where all can see them. His acts, step by step, are in hard substance. He cannot bury his mistakes in the grave like the doctors. He cannot argue them into thin air or blame the judge like the lawyers.” Herbert Hoover


402. “People who blame others for their failures never overcome them. They simply move from problem to problem. To reach your potential, you must continually improve yourself, and you can’t do that if you don’t take responsibility for your actions and learn from your mistakes.”


403. “Let us seek the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future,” – Kennedy


404. Mothers who prepare for a natural birth and write birth plans but end up with necessary interventions do not have to blame themselves for lack of preparation.


405. “Mothers who prepare for a natural birth and write birth plans but end up with necessary interventions do not have to blame themselves for lack of preparation.”


406. A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit. —John Maxwell, author, speaker, and pastor


407. “When a bad SEAL leader walked into a debrief and blamed everyone else, that attitude was picked up by subordinates and team members, who then followed suit. They all blamed everyone else, and inevitably the team was ineffective and unable to properly execute a plan.”


408. “A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit.” - John C. Maxwell


409. “There is great freedom in knowing you are not the source of your negative thoughts,” Mr. Erwin said passionately as he raised his voice. “You don't have to blame yourself anymore. You can recognize the lies, choose not to believe them, and know the positive truth. You are loved. You have value. You are worthy. You are a child of God. You are loved by God. There is a plan for your life. You have greatness inside of you and in every moment, you have the capability to do great things. The best is yet to come if you choose to believe it.”


410. My life motto is ‘Do my best so that I can’t blame myself for anything.


411. “The best leaders checked their egos, accepted blame, sought out constructive criticism, and took detailed notes for improvement. They exhibited Extreme Ownership, and as a result, their SEAL platoons and task units dominated. When a bad SEAL leader walked into a debrief and blamed everyone else, that attitude was picked up by subordinates and team members, who then followed suit. They all blamed everyone else,”


412. “The best day of your life is the one on which you decide your life is your own. No apologies or excuses. No one to lean on. rely on. or blame. The gift is yours – it is an amazing journey – and you alone are responsible for the quality of it. This is the day your life really begins.”


413. “A good leader takes a little more than his share of the blame, a little less than his share of the credit.”


414. “Our society does reward beauty on the outside over health on the inside. Women must not be blamed for choosing short-term beauty "fixes" that harm our long-term health, since our life spans are inverted under the beauty myth, and there is no great social or economic incentive for women to live a long time. A thin young woman with precancerous lungs [who smokes to stay thin] is more highly rewarded socially that a hearty old crone. Spokespeople sell women the Iron Maiden [an intrinsically unattainable standard of beauty used to punish women for their failure to achieve and conform to it]and name her "Health": if public discourse were really concerned with women's health, it would turn angrily upon this aspect of the beauty myth.”


415. “The culture of shame is driven by fear. blame. and disconnection. and it is often a powerful incubator for issues like perfectionism. stereotyping. gossiping. and addiction.”


416. Everything is my fault, I'll take the blame. — "All Apologies" by Nirvana


417. “We are taught you must blame your father, your sisters, your brothers, the school, the teachers – but never blame yourself. It’s never your fault. But it’s always your fault, because if you wanted to change you’re the one who has got to change.” – Katharine Hepburn


418. “A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit.” John Maxwell


419. Don’t blame God for not showering you with gifts. He gives you the gift of a new day with every single morning. Good Morning!


420. “A strong leader accepts blame and gives the credit. A weak leader gives blame and accepts the credit.” - John Wooden


421. “I’m ready to take all the blame. I’m willing to accept that the fault was mine. I’ll do whatever it takes to convince you that our love is worth the trouble. ”


422. “I know people who are losing their jobs or their houses, and they blame technology or the economy or their boss. Sadly, they fail to realize that they might be the problem. Old ideas are their biggest liability. It is a liability simply because they fail to realize that while that idea or way of doing something was an asset yesterday, yesterday is gone.”


423. Mom, you taught me many things when I was a kid. It’s especially good that you taught me to bake because this year I decided to bake your cake. Remember, if it tastes bad you only have yourself to blame!


424. “These leaders cast no blame. They made no excuses. Instead of complaining about challenges or setbacks, they developed solutions and solved problems. They leveraged assets, relationships, and resources to get the job done. Their own egos took a back seat to the mission and their troops. These leaders truly led.”


425. “The physician who prescribes the unusual treatment faces a substantial risk of regret, blame, and perhaps litigation. In hindsight, it will be easier to imagine the normal choice; the abnormal choice will be easy to undo. True, a good outcome will contribute to the reputation of the physician who dared, but the potential benefit is smaller than the potential cost because success is generally a more normal outcome than failure.”


426. Mood swings are at their best as I go through the incredible journey of pregnancy. So, don’t blame me if I’m being weird and mean to you. it’s all for the sweet pregnancy!


427. “If your boss isn’t making a decision in a timely manner or providing necessary support for you and your team, don’t blame the boss. First, blame yourself. Examine”


428. “Anger, blame and avoidance are the ego’s bouncers.” – Dare to Lead


429. “PRINCIPLE: LEADING UP THE CHAIN If your boss isn’t making a decision in a timely manner or providing necessary support for you and your team, don’t blame the boss. First, blame yourself. Examine what you can do to better convey the critical information for decisions to be made and support allocated. Leading up the chain of command requires tactful engagement with the immediate boss (or in military terms, higher headquarters) to obtain the decisions and support necessary to enable your team to accomplish its mission and ultimately win. To do this, a leader must push situational awareness up the chain of command. Leading up the chain takes much more savvy and skill than leading down the chain. Leading up, the leader cannot fall back on his or her positional authority. Instead, the subordinate leader must use influence, experience, knowledge, communication, and maintain the highest professionalism. While pushing to make your superior understand what you need, you must also realize that your boss must allocate limited assets and make decisions with the bigger picture in mind. You and your team may not represent the priority effort at that particular time. Or perhaps the senior leadership has chosen a different direction. Have the humility to understand and accept this. One of the most important jobs of any leader is to support your own boss—your immediate leadership. In any chain of command, the leadership must always present a united front to the troops. A public display of discontent or disagreement with the chain of command undermines the authority of leaders at all levels. This is catastrophic to the performance of any organization. As a leader, if you don’t understand why decisions are being made, requests denied, or support allocated elsewhere, you must ask those questions up the chain. Then, once understood, you can pass that understanding down to your team. Leaders in any chain of command will not always agree. But at the end of the day, once the debate on a particular course of action is over and the boss has made a decision—even if that decision is one you argued against—you must execute the plan as if it were your own. When leading up the chain of command, use caution and respect. But remember, if your leader is not giving the support you need, don’t blame him or her. Instead, reexamine what you can do to better clarify, educate, influence, or convince that person to give you what you need in order to win. The major factors to be aware of when leading up and down the chain of command are these:”


430. “You underestimate your own power so you don't have to blame yourself for treating other people badly.”


431. A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit. —John Maxwell


432. “Perfectionism is not the same thing as striving for excellence. Perfectionism is not about healthy achievement and growth. Perfectionism is a defensive move. It’s the belief that if we do things perfectly and look perfect, we can minimize or avoid the pain of blame, judgment, and shame.”


433. “The best leaders checked their egos, accepted blame, sought out constructive criticism, and took detailed notes for improvement. They”


434. “Sis, Mom may blame her gray hair on us, but I blame my laugh lines on you.”


435. “As Xenophon said, your obstacles are not rivers or mountains or other people; your obstacle is yourself. If you feel lost and confused, if you lose your sense of direction, if you cannot tell the difference between friend and foe, you have only yourself to blame.”


436. The fault is in the one who blames. Spirit sees nothing to criticize.”― Rumi


437. “The reason people blame things on the previous generation is that there’s only one other choice.”


438. “After doing this work or the past twelve years and watching scarcity ride roughshod over our families, organizations, and communities, I'd say the one thing we have in common is that we're sick of feeling afraid. we want to dare greatly. We're tired of the national conversation centering on "What should we fear" and "Who should we blame?" We all want to be brave.”


439. “Teamwork is essential – it allows you to blame someone else.”


440. “The leader must own everything in his or her world. There is no one else to blame. The leader must acknowledge mistakes and admit failures, take ownership of them, and develop a plan to win.”


441. "I am partly to blame for the decking boom, and I am sorry, I know it?s everywhere these days.” — Alan Titchmarsh


442. “Tortured Genius.” By this, he did not mean the artist or musician who suffers from mental health issues, but in the context of ownership. No matter how obvious his or her failing, or how valid the criticism, a Tortured Genius, in this sense, accepts zero responsibility for mistakes, makes excuses, and blames everyone else for their failings (and those of their team). In their mind, the rest of the world just can’t see or appreciate the genius in what they are doing. An individual with a Tortured Genius mind-set can have catastrophic impact on a team’s performance.”


443. “I pay no attention whatever to anybody’s praise or blame. I simply follow my own feelings.” – Mozart


444. “Wilby and Techie!” Wilbur and Techno both flushed with embarrassment before rushing over to the kitchen to start dinner. Phil chuckled at their response. It seriously seemed like the only person those two would listen to was Tommy. But Phil couldn’t blame them, Tommy was adorable and they loved their tiny boy so much.


445. “I pay no attention whatever to anybody’s praise or blame. I simply follow my own feelings.” — Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart


446. “Backstabbers take credit and give blame.”


447. "Just as a solid rock is not shaken by the storm, even so the wise are not affected by praise or blame.” — Buddha


448. “We want to learn the lesson and not repeat the experience. But in truth, we do not like to look too closely at what we did; our introspection is limited. Our natural response is to blame others, circumstances, or a momentary lapse of judgment.”


449. You can’t blame gravity for falling in love. — Albert Einstein


450. “self-deception that contributes to ethical fading is when we remove ourselves from the chain of causation or, as the CEO of Mylan did, blame “the system” for our own transgressions. Sometimes we can take ourselves so far out of the chain of causation that we actually lay all the responsibility for how our products affect a consumer on the consumer.”

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