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500 Inspirational OCD Quotes: Mental Health (2023)

1. ‘Obsessive Compulsive Disorder,’ commonly known as OCD, is a mental health condition.


2. “ A lot of mental disorders are initially things that are adaptive. Like even OCD, it’s good to sort of have structure and have certain rituals, but when it gets to be extreme, then it becomes problematic. ” — H. A. Berlin


3. “… the irony of OCD—it tells you bad things will happen if you don’t do these compulsions, but ultimately, it’s these compulsions that pull you further and further away from your life. Before you know it, all this time and energy that was put into preventing bad things actually caused bad things to happen!” – Marisa T. Mazza


4. “…if you rely solely on medication to manage depression or anxiety, for example, you have done nothing to train the mind, so that when you come off the medication, you are just as vulnerable to a relapse as though you had never taken the medication.” — Daniel Goleman


5. “…people with OCD often wear a mask. On the outside they appear so put together, but on the inside, they are falling apart. ” – Marisa T. Mazza


6. “‘Positive vibes only’ isn’t a thing. Humans have a wide range of emotions and that’s OK.” — Molly Bahr, LMHC


7. ““It’s not the thoughts but rather what you do with them that maintains the OCD cycle.”


8. ““When it isn’t thinking about the future, the OCD mind dwells on possibilities from the past. The mind fills with thoughts about what might have occurred.”


9. “[It’s] like that song that plays over and over in your head, only you can’t get rid of it. ” — Kimberly Matthews-Cifra


10. “[It’s] like that song that plays over and over in your head, only you can’t get rid of it.” – Kimberly Matthews-Cifra


11. “[Slow breathing] is like an anchor in the midst of an emotional storm: the anchor won’t make the storm goes away, but it will hold you steady until it passes. — Russ Harris


12. “A common misconception held by individuals with OCD is that they can and should control what pops into their heads. Given that nobody can dictate the kinds of thoughts and images that enter the mind, this idea can lead to an unwinnable war with your own brain. At the core of OCD is a tendency to greatly misinterpret thoughts and images that you experience. ” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


13. “A full recovery doesn’t in any way depend on having the mental events no longer enter your mind. A full recovery depends on reclaiming your mind, body, heart and soul from the clutches of your OCD. ” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


14. “A full recovery doesn’t in any way depend on having the mental events no longer enter your mind. A full recovery depends on reclaiming your mind, body, heart and soul from the clutches of your OCD.” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


15. “A lot of people assume that having OCD means liking things organized or hating germs. It tends to be treated like a quirk or an endearing trait. But it’s so much more than that. ” ― Whitney Amazeen


16. “A lot of people assume that having OCD means liking things organized or hating germs. It tends to be treated like a quirk or an endearing trait. But it’s so much more than that. It’s the one thing that prohibits me from being free of myself. ” ― Whitney Amazeen


17. “A lot of people assume that having OCD means liking things organized or hating germs. It tends to be treated like a quirk or an endearing trait. But it’s so much more than that. It’s the one thing that prohibits me from being free of myself.”


18. “A lot of people assume that having OCD means liking things organized or hating germs. It tends to be treated like a quirk or an endearing trait. But it’s so much more than that. It’s the one thing that prohibits me from being free of myself.” – Whitney Amazeen


19. “A man that flies from his fear may find that he has only taken a shortcut to meet it.”


20. “A physical sensation crawls up my arm as I avoid compulsions. But if I complete it, the world resets itself for a moment like everything will be just fine. But only for a moment. ” — Mardy M. Berlinger


21. “All people eventually suffer from a variety of risky situations and outcomes such as illness, accidents, tragedy, war, grief, and ultimately death. But the OCD mind tries to create the illusion that almost all risks can be anticipated and avoided. In truth, OCD doesn’t provide significant protection in spite of extraordinary efforts to reduce risks. ” – Laura L. Smith


22. “All stress, anxiety, depression, is caused when we ignore who we are, and start living to please others.”


23. “Although the general perception of mental illness has improved over the past decades, studies show that stigma against mental illness is still powerful, largely due to media stereotypes and lack of education, and that people tend to attach negative stigmas to mental health conditions at a far higher rate than to other diseases and disabilities, such as cancer, diabetes or heart disease.”


24. “Although the world is full of suffering, it is also full of the overcoming of it.”


25. “An important idea that keeps OCD going is that even if something bad happening is unlikely, you should still do everything possible to try to prevent it (i. e. inflated responsibility belief). ” – Fiona Challacombe


26. “An important idea that keeps OCD going is that even if something bad happening is unlikely, you should still do everything possible to try to prevent it (i.e. inflated responsibility belief).” – Fiona Challacombe


27. “And sometimes I have kept my feelings to myself, because I could find no language to describe them in.”


28. “And will you succeed?


29. “Another way to think about it is that OCD likes to get you where it hurts. When people have particularly strong beliefs (for example, about things like cleanliness, order, religion, etc. ), their OCD tends to have content related to these beliefs. This connection is likely because the out-ofcharacter thought sticks out immediately (because it goes directly against everything the person holds true) and the person therefore attaches a meaning to it. ” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


30. “Another, very important, issue is that due to the shame and secrecy that often surrounds OCD, people can become very good at hiding their symptoms, or delaying their rituals until they are alone. People with OCD can become very skilled at generating subtle excuses so they can avoid situations where their problem will be worse. ” – Fiona Challacombe


31. “Anxiety does not empty tomorrow of its sorrows, but only empties today of its strength.” — Charles Spurgeon


32. “Anxiety is a thin stream of fear trickling through the mind. If encouraged, it cuts a channel into which all other thoughts are drained.” — Arthur Somers Roche


33. “Anyone can be affected, despite their level of success or their place on the food chain. In fact, there is a good chance you know someone who is struggling with it since nearly 20% of American adults face some form of mental illness in their lifetime. So why aren’t we talking about it?” — Kristen Bell


34. “Anyone can have a few obsessions or compulsions, and, in fact, most people do. But it isn’t obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) unless the obsessions and compulsions consume considerable amounts of time and interfere significantly with the quality of your life. ” – Laura L. Smith


35. “Anything that’s human is mentionable, and anything that is mentionable can be more manageable. When we can talk about our feelings, they become less overwhelming, less upsetting, and less scary.” — Fred Rogers


36. “As the saying goes, ‘the wheel that squeaks the loudest gets the grease’. And with emotions like fear and guilt, plus strong urges to carry out compulsions, OCD can squeak so very loudly!” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


37. “As you move through life, the OCD will be on one shoulder and your values on the other. The OCD barks orders, driving you to live in fear, while your values remind you of the things that give you deeper meaning and help you feel alive. You always have the freedom to choose which to focus on: feeding your OCD or living your values. ” – Marisa T. Mazza


38. “As you reflect back on the previous weeks, months or year, look for moments you can celebrate too. There will be some, even if you have to look a little harder.” — Emily Coxhead


39. “As you’ve unwittingly trained yourself to deal with your OCD in unhelpful ways, it’s going to take time and perseverance to retrain yourself. OCD is a cunning beast and will try as many ways as possible to deter you from doing anything it doesn’t like – the trick is to make a plan and stick to it no matter what the OCD says or does to try to dissuade you. ” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


40. “At its crux, OCD treatment is about learning to live with the discomfort of uncertainty. ” – Jeff Bell


41. “At its crux, OCD treatment is about learning to live with the discomfort of uncertainty. ” — Jeff Bell


42. “At its crux, OCD treatment is about learning to live with the discomfort of uncertainty.”


43. “At its crux, OCD treatment is about learning to live with the discomfort of uncertainty.” – Jeff Bell


44. “At times, seeing your way out of OCD through the forest of intolerance of uncertainty, fear, excessive responsibility and so on can be hard. ” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


45. “At times, seeing your way out of OCD through the forest of intolerance of uncertainty, fear, excessive responsibility and so on can be hard. ” ― Katie d’Ath


46. “At times, seeing your way out of OCD through the forest of intolerance of uncertainty, fear, excessive responsibility and so on can be hard.” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


47. “Because all mental compulsions or responses maintain the problem, it stands to reason that in order to kick your OCD into touch, you need to respond differently. ” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


48. “Because all mental compulsions or responses maintain the problem, it stands to reason that in order to kick your OCD into touch, you need to respond differently.” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


49. “Because OCD is characterised by doubt, a need for certainty and often perfectionism, people tend to get tied up in knots about which kind of thought or thinking they’re having. Instead of trying to get it right, think of this obstacle as another exercise in figuring out how to deal with doubt differently and challenge yourself to assume you’ve understood correctly even if you’re not absolutely sure. ” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


50. “Because OCD tends to inflate the importance of certain inner experiences (such as thoughts, images and so on) or narrow your focus to particular feared threats, you can easily end up neglecting your health. What’s important to you as far as your mental health is concerned alongside your physical health? Do you regularly exercise, eat well and get an appropriate amount of sleep? If not, what can you do to improve in these areas?” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


51. “Because the thoughts and behaviors of those with OCD are so unusual or socially unacceptable, people with OCD often feel deeply embarrassed and ashamed. ” – Laura L. Smith


52. “Because the thoughts and behaviors of those with OCD are so unusual or socially unacceptable, people with OCD often feel deeply embarrassed and ashamed.”


53. “Because the thoughts and behaviors of those with OCD are so unusual or socially unacceptable, people with OCD often feel deeply embarrassed and ashamed.” – Laura L. Smith


54. “Because wherever I sat — on the deck of a ship or at a street café in Paris or Bangkok — I would be sitting under the same glass bell jar, stewing in my own sour air.” ― Sylvia Plath


55. “Being able to be your true self is one of the strongest components of good mental health.”


56. “Being able to be your true self is one of the strongest components of good mental health.” – Dr. Lauren Fogel Mersy


57. “Being able to be your true self is one of the strongest components of good mental health.” — Dr. Lauren Fogel Mersy


58. “Being vulnerable is actually a strength and not a weakness — that’s why more and more mental health is such an important thing to talk about. It’s the same as being physically sick. And when you keep all those things inside, when you bottle them up, it makes you ill.” — Cara Delevingne


59. “Better isn't always a feeling.”


60. “But here’s the catch for those of us with OCD: We don’t need a bear or a lion — or any other legitimate threat — to trigger our fight- or-flight responses. Our core fears —those “what if” questions our bullies pose — do the trick just fine. ” – Jeff Bell


61. “But the most important part of her ritual was cleaning the toilet. In order to prevent the spread of bacteria and viruses, it had to be done with absolute thoroughness and precision. Cleaning the toilet was a test of her competence and loyalty to Oliver, her god, and the precept of staying in control.”


62. “By taking care of myself I have so much more to offer the world than I do when I am running on empty.” – Ali Washington


63. “Cats are like four-legged poster children for OCD. ” — Caroline Knapp


64. “Change what you can, manage what you can’t.” ― Raymond McCauley


65. “Compulsions are a form of control. They work in the short run, in that they usually reduce or at least neutralize anxiety. However, in the long run, the unwillingness to experience what shows up gets in the way of people accepting themselves and learning that they are truly capable. ” – Marisa T. Mazza


66. “Consequently, actions that successfully improve the overall mental health of the population are likely to be accompanied by other important benefits to society.”


67. “Contrary to popular belief, OCD isn’t simply a disorder where people wash their hands too much, check things or keep things orderly. You may have heard people say, ‘I’m a bit OCD’, usually referring to a tendency for liking things clean or tidy; however, people can have a strong preference for things to be in order and not have OCD. In these cases, people find their preference for cleanliness or orderliness a helpful attribute from which they may often derive satisfaction. ” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


68. “Crazy isn’t being broken or swallowing a dark secret. It’s you or me amplified. If you ever told a lie and enjoyed it. If you ever wished you could be a child forever.” ― Susanna Kaysen


69. “Curing yourself of obsessive compulsive disorder by going to a strip club is pretty strange.” – Tracy Kidder


70. “Deep breathing is our nervous system’s love language.” — Dr. Lauren Fogel Mersy


71. “Depression weighs you down like a rock in a river. You don’t stand a chance. You can fight and pray and hope you have the strength to swim, but sometimes, you have to let yourself sink. Because you’ll never know true happiness until someone or something pulls you back out of that river — and you’ll never believe it until you realize it was you, yourself who saved you.” ― Alysha Speer


72. “Despite the noises,


73. “Don’t believe everything you think.” — Unknown


74. “Don’t believe the guilt. It’s only a byproduct of OCD.” – Unknown


75. “Don’t feel bad for yourself because you have OCD. Feeling bad is a sign of weakness and you need to be strong in your battle with OCD.” – Unknown


76. “Don’t let OCD control your life. You are in charge, not the disorder. ” — Charlize Theron


77. “Don’t let OCD control your life. You are in charge, not the disorder.”


78. “Don’t let OCD control your life. You are in charge, not the disorder.” – Charlize Theron


79. “Don’t let your mind bully your body into believing it must carry the burden of its worries.” — Astrid Alauda


80. “Don’t make fun of anyone with OCD because the person from outside is calm like water but from the inside anxiety can develop a hurricane.” – Unknown


81. “Don’t try to figure out an OCD question. Accept the uncertainty.” – Unknown


82. “Doubt and uncertainty plague the minds of those with the “checking” form of OCD. Some experts even call OCD a “disease of doubt. ” When doubts show up, the person goes back to check over and over again. A slight amount of uncertainty always remains even after checking, so the person does it yet again. Sometimes it takes an awful lot of rechecking before the person is able to stop. ” – Laura L. Smith


83. “Doubt permeates the OCD mind. It’s difficult to be 100 percent certain of almost any situation in life. ” – Laura L. Smith


84. “Doubt permeates the OCD mind. It’s difficult to be 100 percent certain of almost any situation in life.” – Laura L. Smith


85. “Emotions, moods, impulses, ebb and flow with the tide of my life. Tidal waves, at times, in a bipolar mind.” ― H.G.


86. “eople with OCD go to great lengths to avoid bad things happening. They tend to focus on the worst possible thing, focusing on how awful it would be if it did happen. People with OCD feel that what they fear is likely to happen and are very motivated to avoid the possibility that they could be responsible if they did not try to prevent it happening. ” – Fiona Challacombe


87. “Ever seen ‘Inside Out’? With OCD, it’s like Doubt has it’s own control console. ” — Josey Eloy Franco


88. “Everyone experiences a version of anxiety or worry in their lives, and maybe we go through it in a different or more intense way for longer periods of time, but there’s nothing wrong with you.” – Emma Stone


89. “Feel the feelings and do it anyway.”


90. “Feeling your feelings will not lead to depression.” — Jordan Pickell, MCP RCC


91. “Feelings come and go like clouds in a windy sky. Conscious breathing is my anchor.” — Thich Nhat Hanh


92. “Fighting OCD is like boxing. Each time you go against a thought, it’s a punch to its strength. Each time you listen to your OCD, its biceps get bigger and it becomes a more powerful opponent. It’s a war of attrition – you just have to keep fighting.”


93. “Fighting OCD is like boxing. Each time you go against a thought, it’s a punch to its strength. Each time you listen to your OCD, its biceps get bigger and it becomes a more powerful opponent. It’s a war of attrition – you just have to keep fighting.” – Allison Britz


94. “Fighting OCD is like boxing. Each time you go against a thought, it’s a punch to its strength. Each time you listen to your OCD, its biceps get bigger and it becomes a more powerful opponent. It’s a war of attrition—you just have to keep fighting. ” – Allison Britz


95. “Fighting OCD is like boxing. Each time you go against a thought, it’s a punch to its strength. Each time you listen to your OCD, its biceps get bigger and it becomes a more powerful opponent. It’s a war of attrition—you just have to keep fighting.” – Allison Britz


96. “Fighting OCD is like boxing. Each time you go against a thought, it’s a punch to its strength. Each time you listen to your OCD, its biceps get bigger, and it becomes a more powerful opponent. ” — Allison Britz


97. “For me, it’s an ever-present nagging feeling that something is just ‘not right. ’ I can never really, truly ‘make it right. ’ I have to learn to live with the all-consuming feeling of mental discomfort. ” — Laura McCarthy


98. “For me, it’s an ever-present nagging feeling that something is just ‘not right.’ I can never really, truly ‘make it right.’ I have to learn to live with the all-consuming feeling of mental discomfort.” – Laura McCarthy


99. “For me, it’s an ever-present nagging feeling that something is just ‘not right.’ I can never really, truly ‘make it right.’ I have to learn to live with the all-consuming feeling of mental discomfort“


100. “For me, it’s like someone else has control of your brain. Like you’re being forced to do an endless number of completely random, pointless tasks you don’t want to do. It’s so exhausting and emotionally draining — like your brain needs an off switch!” — Clarissa Chay


101. “For most people, OCD is probably best understood as a misunderstanding of how their minds work, which can lead to some attempts to solve the problem that backfire. ” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


102. “For most people, OCD is probably best understood as a misunderstanding of how their minds work, which can lead to some attempts to solve the problem that backfire.” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


103. “For OCD checkers such as myself, the act of checking is akin to treasure hunting in a dark cave and discovering a hatch marked “Gold. ” We pry it up, look inside, and fall in, only to find ourselves even deeper in the cave. We get back on our feet, start looking around, and come across another hatch marked “Diamonds. ” We pry it open, look inside, and again fall deeper into the cave. This is how trapdoors work, and this is how checking leaves us ever more stuck in Doubt. ” – Jeff Bell


104. “For some people, this driven impulsivity seems to underlie their OCD more than anxiety or worry. That’s why some experts suggest that problems such as trichotillomania (uncontrollable hair-pulling) and tics (uncontrollable jerking, body movements, or sounds) are related to OCD. ” – Laura L. Smith


105. “Given the idiosyncratic nature of OCD, the particular triggering event, or events, can also be very individual. Common triggering events are changing school, other major life transitions like leaving home, losing a loved one, illness in yourself or someone important to you, having a baby, parental conflict, bullying, and relationship break-up. These events would, of course, be stressful for anyone, but for people who go on to develop OCD, there are often particular conclusions drawn at the time in relation to responsibility and the need to control what is happening. ” – Fiona Challacombe


106. “Gloria watched the swollen white orb of a hot-air balloon rising over Navy Pier and knew she had to break it off with Oliver, for he was the type who would never enjoy hot-air balloons, Van Morrison songs, or mess, whether from orgasm or otherwise. But who was she to be dreaming about mess today?”


107. “Good humor is a tonic for mind and body. It is the best antidote for anxiety and depression. It is a business asset. It attracts and keeps friends. It lightens human burdens. It is the direct route to serenity and contentment.” — Grenville Kleiser


108. “Habit if not resisted, soon becomes necessity.” – St. Augustine


109. “Happiness can be found even in the darkest of times, if one only remembers to turn on the light.” — Albus Dumbledore from Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban


110. “Happiness can be found, even in the darkest of times, if one only remembers to turn on the light.”


111. “Have patience with all things, but chiefly have patience with yourself. Do not lose courage in considering your own imperfections but instantly set about remedying them—every day begin the task anew.” –Saint Francis de Sales


112. “Healing doesn’t mean the damage never existed. It means the damage no longer controls our lives.” – Unknown


113. “However much rational argument you provide, you still won’t feel 100 percent convinced. The OCD likes to have the last word, so you could keep arguing with it forever. ” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


114. “However much rational argument you provide, you still won’t feel 100 percent convinced. The OCD likes to have the last word, so you could keep arguing with it forever. ” — Rob Willson


115. “However much rational argument you provide, you still won’t feel 100 percent convinced. The OCD likes to have the last word, so you could keep arguing with it forever.” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


116. “However, the frightening, disturbing thoughts of OCD are not based on reality. People with OCD have these thoughts because their OCD minds produce them, not because they are evil or malicious. It is extremely rare for someone with OCD to actually carry out a shameful act. ” – Laura L. Smith


117. “I actually have OCD really bad, and it’s getting a bit worse at the moment. I have to check taps… before I leave the house, to make sure I’ve checked everything in case it floods. ” — Sam Smith


118. “I am bent, but not broken. I am scarred, but not disfigured. I am sad, but not hopeless. I am tired, but not powerless. I am angry, but not bitter. I am depressed, but not giving up.” — Anonymous


119. “I am bipolar, and I am proud. And that is why I wanted to write a book. To shine a light on mental illness, to be vulnerable about the days I let it take control and paid dearly for it, and to tell anyone fighting a similar battle: You are not alone. You are not broken.” — AJ Lee


120. “I am not afraid of storms for I am learning how to sail my ship.”


121. “I am not afraid of storms for I am learning how to sail my ship.” — Amy March, from Little Women


122. “I believe the best way to manage our thoughts is to first educate ourselves. We need to fully understand how a mental illness can feel to someone before we thoughtfully talk about it.”


123. “I could think of nothing but the loneliness of being stuck in that glass room with only OCD for company. OCD, the bully; OCD, the oppressor; OCD, the destroyer of lives; OCD”


124. “I could walk through fire if it meant making my dreams come true. That is the gift being bipolar gave me. It blessed me with a lofty imagination, an iron will, and an unbreakable belief in the impossible.” — AJ Mendez


125. “I do not have OCD OCD OCD. ” — Emilie Autumn


126. “I do not have OCD OCD OCD.”


127. “I don’t regret opening up about what I went through [with depression], because, it sounds really cliché, but I have had women come up to me and say, ‘It meant so much to me.’ It means so much when you realize that someone was having a really hard time and feeling shame and was trying to hide this whole thing.” — Winona Ryder


128. “I found that with depression, one of the most important things you can realize is that you’re not alone. You’re not the first to go through it, you’re not gonna be the last to go through it,” — Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson


129. “I got 99 problems and OCD is one of them.” – Unknown


130. “I guess I wonder what it would be like, to be living their live instead of mine.”


131. “I have a slight bit of OCD, I think. I’m not walking around flipping light switches. But when I say I’m going to do something, I have to do it.” – Eminem


132. “I have got this obsessive compulsive disorder where I have to have everything in a straight line, or everything has to be in pairs.” – David Beckham


133. “I have OCD mixed with ADD; you try living with that. It’s complicated. ” ― Justin Timberlake


134. “I have OCD mixed with ADD; you try living with that. It’s complicated.”


135. “I have OCD mixed with ADD; you try living with that. It’s complicated.” – Justin Timberlake


136. “I have OCD, which is not fun. I have to be incredibly tidy and organized or it messes with my mind and switches off on me.” – Charlize Theron


137. “I have OCD, which is not fun. I have to be incredibly tidy and organized or it messes with my mind and switches off on me”


138. “I have seen many cases like N. during the five years I've been in practice. I sometimes picture these unfortunates as men and women being pecked to death by predatory birds. The birds are invisible - at least until a psychiatrist who is good, or lucky, or both, sprays them with his version of Luminol and shines the right light on them - but they are nevertheless very real. The wonder is that so many OCDs manage to live productive lives, just the same. They work, they eat (often not enough or too much, it's true), they go to movies, they make love to their girlfriends and boyfriends, their wives and husbands . . . and all the time those birds are there, clinging to them and pecking away little bits of flesh.”


139. “I have sporadic OCD cleaning moments around the house. But then I get lazy, and I’m cured. It’s a very inconsistent personality trait. ” — Chris Hemsworth


140. “I keep moving ahead, as always, knowing deep down inside that I am a good person and that I am worthy of a good life.” ― Jonathan Harnisch


141. “I knew well enough that one could fracture one’s legs and arms and recover afterward, but I did not know that you could fracture the brain in your head and recover from that too.” ― Vincent van Gogh


142. “I may have OCD, but it’s also my superpower. ” — Amrapali Gupta


143. “I think everyone has a bit of OCD in them. It’s just a matter of degree. ” — David Beckham


144. “I think everyone has a bit of OCD in them. It’s just a matter of degree.” – David Beckham


145. “I was with someone recently who asked: ‘Well, don’t you think that if you do too much therapy it will take away your artistic process?’ And I told them: ‘The biggest lie that we’ve ever been sold is that we as artists have to stay in pain to create.'” — Katy Perry


146. “I would say what others have said: It gets better. One day, you’ll find your tribe. You just have to trust that people are out there waiting to love you and celebrate you for who you are. In the meantime, the reality is you might have to be your own tribe. You might have to be your own best friend. That’s not something they’re going to teach you in school. So start the work of loving yourself. — Wentworth Miller


147. “I'm a person who also happens to have OCD.” – Patricia Perkins-Doyle


148. “I'm tired of being inside my head. I want to live out here, with you.”


149. “I’m a hygiene freak. I’m like obsessive-compulsive when it comes to washing your hands.” – Kelly Clarkson


150. “I’m a person who also happens to have OCD”


151. “I’m able to say at some point, ‘OK, you’re being ridiculous, stop stepping on every gum stain you see. You don’t need to do that. You don’t need to walk 20 feet back and put your foot on that thing. Nothing bad is going to happen,’” – Leonardo DiCaprio


152. “I’m not the kind of person who likes to shout out my personal issues from the rooftops, but with my bipolar becoming public, I hope fellow sufferers will know it’s completely controllable. I hope I can help remove any stigma attached to it, and that those who don’t have it under control will seek help with all that is available to treat it.” — Catherine Zeta-Jones


153. “I’m OCD beyond comparison. ” — Fred Durst


154. “I’m Smart, So I Should Be Able to Overpower ADHD. Right?”


155. “I’m tired of being inside my head. I want to live out here, with you.”


156. “I’m too measured and controlling – about everything. That’s why I take Lexapro. It’s for OCD. I don’t feel like I’m struggling with it. I think OCD is a part of me that protects me. It’s also the part of me that I use in my job in a positive way. ” — Amanda Seyfried


157. “If OCD is causing significant interference in your life it is important to acknowledge this reality. Even if this is difficult, it is the springboard for thinking about why it’s so important to change, and for imagining how you would like your life to be without this problem. ” – Fiona Challacombe


158. “If there is no struggle, there is no progress.” — Fredrick Douglass


159. “If you are going through an OCD spike, allow it to pass, don’t force it to leave. Give no energy towards it!” – Unknown


160. “If you have OCD you may think of the problem as one of ‘mad, bad or dangerous to know’, all ideas that can fill you with some combination of shame, terror and misery. OCD is none of these things, and understanding how OCD works is an intrinsic part of moving through treatment and beating the problem so you can reclaim your life. ” – Fiona Challacombe


161. “If you know someone who’s depressed please resolve to never ask them why. Depression isn’t a straightforward response to a bad situation; depression just is, like the weather. Try to understand the blackness, lethargy, hopelessness and loneliness they’re going through. Be there for them when they come through the other side. It’s hard to be a friend to someone who’s depressed, but it is one of the kindest, noblest and best things you will ever do.” — Stephen Fry


162. “If you want to conquer the anxiety of life, live in the moment, live in the breath.” — Amit Ray


163. “If you want to get over OCD you need to be as strong as the disorder.” – Unknown


164. “If you’re going through hell, keep going.” — Winston Churchill


165. “Imagine all your worst thoughts as a soundtrack running through your mind 24/7, day after day. ” — Adam Walker Cleveland


166. “Imagine all your worst thoughts as a soundtrack running through your mind 24/7, day after day.”


167. “Imagine all your worst thoughts as a soundtrack running through your mind 24/7, day after day.” – Adam Walker Cleveland


168. “Imagine you have an OCD-free twin who is the same as you in every way but free from excessive fears, compulsions, and avoidance. This can be a great reference point when thinking how you could change your behaviour and resist participating with your OCD—ask yourself the question, ‘what would my OCD-free twin do in this situation?’” — Katie d’Ath


169. “Imagine you have an OCD-free twin, who is the same as you in every way but free from excessive fears, compulsions and avoidance. This can be a great reference point when thinking how you could change your behaviour and resist participating with your OCD – ask yourself the question, ‘what would my OCD-free twin do in this situation?’” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


170. “In OCD, not getting things we believe we have a responsibility for ‘just right’ turns out to be at the centre of things. ” – Fiona Challacombe


171. “In OCD, not getting things we believe we have a responsibility for ‘just right’ turns out to be at the centre of things. ” ― Fiona Challacombe


172. “In OCD, not getting things we believe we have a responsibility for ‘just right’ turns out to be at the centre of things.” – Fiona Challacombe


173. “In the middle of winter I at last discovered that there was in me an invincible summer.” — Albert Camus


174. “Increasing the strength of our minds is the only way to reduce the difficulty of life.” ― Mokokoma Mokhonoana


175. “Is it fear?” Felicity asks. “Though I suppose fear is elicited by an immediate threat, and it sounds as though often there isn’t one. Except those created inside your mind. So it’s fear looking for a source? Does that sound right?”


176. “It (trying to keep the law) grants you the power to judge others and feel superior to them. You believe you are living to a higher standard than those you judge. Enforcing rules, especially in its more subtle expressions like responsibility and expectation, is a vain attempt to create certainty out of uncertainty. And contrary to what you might think, I have a great fondness for uncertainty. Rules cannot bring freedom; they only have the power to accuse.”


177. “It can look like still waters on the outside while a hurricane is swirling in your mind. ” — Marcie Barber Phares


178. “It can look like still waters on the outside while a hurricane is swirling in your mind.” – Marcie Barber Phares


179. “It is during our darkest moments that we must focus to see the light.” — Aristotle


180. “It may sound strange, but the more thorough you are in doing the opposite of what the OCD wants (for example, spreading the contamination or saying the things you usually avoid thinking), the easier it will be for you not to perform any compulsions. It’s as if the OCD thinks ‘Whoa, that’s way too much for me to put right, so I may as well just lump it and get used to it. ’” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


181. “It means constantly questioning whether what I’m thinking or feeling is me or the OCD. The decision is usually a crap shoot. And then you question the decision over, and over, and over, and over and over, trying to come up with the ‘right’ answer. ” — Anna Stinson


182. “It takes dedication, perseverance and patience to overcome OCD, and each of these is far more valuable to you than thinking about your speed!”


183. “It takes dedication, perseverance and patience to overcome OCD, and each of these is far more valuable to you than thinking about your speed!” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


184. “It takes ten times as long to put yourself back together as it does to fall apart.”


185. “It’s like a broken machine. Thoughts go in your head, get stuck and keep going around and around. ” — Megan Flynn


186. “It’s like being controlled by a puppeteer. Every time you try and just walk away he pulls you back. Are you sure the stove is off and everything is unplugged? Back up we go. Are you sure your hands are as clean as they can get? Back ya go. Are you sure the doors are securely locked? Back down we go. How many people have touched this object? Wash your hands again. ” — Toni Neville


187. “It’s like having mental hiccups. Mostly, we can function despite the ‘hiccups,’ but we’re exhausted attempting to carry on as if they didn’t exist. ” — Sheila Cavanaugh


188. “It’s like having mental hiccups. Mostly, we can function despite the ‘hiccups,’ but we’re exhausted attempting to carry on as if they didn’t exist.” – Sheila Cavanaugh


189. “It’s like listening to a CD with an invisible scratch. ” — Penny Hare


190. “It’s like looking through a magnifying glass that only picks up on the potentially dangerous, harmful and scary. ” — Laura


191. “It’s like you have two brains — a rational brain and an irrational brain. And they’re constantly fighting. ” — Emilie Ford


192. “It’s like you have two brains a rational brain and an irrational brain. And they’re constantly fighting.” – Emilie Ford


193. “It’s my experience that people are a lot more sympathetic if they can see you hurting, and for the millionth time in my life I wish for measles or smallpox or some other easily understood disease just to make it easier on me and also on them.” ― Jennifer Niven


194. “It’s not the thoughts but rather what you do with them that maintains the OCD cycle. ” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


195. “It’s not the thoughts but rather what you do with them that maintains the OCD cycle. ” — Katie d’Ath


196. “It’s not the thoughts but rather what you do with them that maintains the OCD cycle.” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


197. “It’s possible to live well, feel well, and also find happiness with bipolar disorder or any other mental illness [you’re] struggling with.” — Demi Lovato


198. “IWe would never tell someone with a broken leg that they should stop wallowing and get it together. We don’t consider taking medication for an ear infection something to be ashamed of. We shouldn’t treat mental health conditions any differently.” – Michelle Obama


199. “Just because no one else can heal or do your inner work for you doesn’t mean you can, should, or need to do it alone.” — Lisa Olivera


200. “Just because no one else can heal or do your inner work for you, doesn’t mean you can, should, or need to do it alone.”


201. “Just remember, you are not alone, in fact, you are in a very commonplace with millions of others. We need to help each other and keep striving to reach our goals.” — Mike Moreno


202. “Kessa began to cut her meat into tiny pieces. As a whole it was unmanageable, frightening; but divided and arranged, the meat could be controlled. She cut four pieces. She'd count to four between each bite.”


203. “Leaving knots untied and scattering seeds to distract them will only work on vampires with OCD.”


204. “Let OCD tell you whatever it wants, just don’t try to solve it. The thoughts are not the problem.” – Unknown


205. “Let OCD tell you whatever it wants. Don’t try to solve it.” – Unknown


206. “Life doesn’t make any sense without interdependence. We need each other, and the sooner we learn that, the better for us all.” — Erik Erikson


207. “Life is like a piano; the white keys represent happiness and the black show sadness. But as you go through life’s journey, remember that the black keys also create music.” — Ehssan


208. “Many people confuse distracting yourself from your OCD thoughts and feelings (which is unhelpful and compounds the problem) with redirecting your attention to external activities. The line between the two is quite fine. However, here’s a simple way to understand the difference: It’s all about your intention. When you try to distract yourself from your OCD thoughts and feelings, you’re trying to get away from them or escape from them in some way. You’re trying not to think or feel these things. This approach is a kind of avoidance and only makes the problem worse in the long run. When you try to redirect your attention elsewhere, you’re letting the thoughts and feelings be there but choosing not to engage in them. ” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


209. “Many survivors insist they’re not courageous: ‘If I were courageous I would have stopped the abuse.’ ‘If I were courageous, I wouldn’t be scared’… Most of us have it mixed up. You don’t start with courage and then face fear. You become courageous because you face your fear.” ― Laura Davis


210. “Martin said, "It feels as though part of my self has detached and gone to Amsterdam, where it—she—is waiting for me. Do you know about phantom-limb syndrome?" Julia nodded. "There's pain where she ought to be. It's feeding the other pain, the thing that makes me wash and count and all that. So her absence is stopping me from going to find her. Do you see?”


211. “Media, especially social media, depends on sensationalism to gain viewers. News is mostly negative and dramatic. Human beings are prewired to pay attention to potential threats. And the media takes advantage of that tendency. No wonder people with OCD tend to get worse when the news constantly spews out possible catastrophes. ” – Laura L. Smith


212. “Mental health affects every aspect of your life. It’s not just this neat little issue you can put into a box.” — Shannon Purser


213. “Mental health clinicians need to address the issue of stigma, which is so often attached to mental illness. They need to support efforts to prevent mental ill health and promote health, wellness and resilience. Clinicians need to support the rights of people with mental illness, and enable them to participate meaningfully in society.”


214. “Mental health is something that we all need to talk about, and we need to take the stigma away from it. So let’s raise the awareness. Let’s let everybody know it’s OK to have a mental illness and addiction problem.” — Demi Lovato


215. “Mental health problems don’t define who you are. They are something you experience. You walk in the rain and you feel the rain, but, importantly, YOU ARE NOT THE RAIN.” — Matt Haig


216. “Mental illness is nothing to be ashamed of, but stigma and bias shame us all.“


217. “Mental illness… occurs when our mental health is compromised or neglected for so long that it affects our ability to function in our everyday life.”


218. “Mental pain is less dramatic than physical pain, but it is more common and also more hard to bear. The frequent attempt to conceal mental pain increases the burden: It is easier to say ‘My tooth is aching’ than to say ‘My heart is broken.’”


219. “More important than the quest for certainty is the quest for clarity.”


220. “Most people say "I'd do anything for my child," but the Harm OCD sufferer has to do more than just show up for the job. You have to show up to this amazing beautiful being even knowing that it aggravates your disorder. You have to do exposure to the darkest, most terrifying corners of the mind. You have to cope with extreme love, often reminding you of extreme fear. You have to tolerate the uncertainty that your child may have a short or painful life in order to maximize the possibility that she has a happy one. To love your children is to be vulnerable to them and to see their vulnerability. You have to risk being harmed and you have to risk harming in order to be close to anyone. OCD can make you think you're too crazy to deserve this closeness with a child. But you're not crazy. You got this.”


221. “My anxiety doesn’t come from thinking about the future but from wanting to control it.” — Hugh Prather


222. “My dark days made me stronger. Or maybe I already was strong, and they made me prove it.” — Emery Lord


223. “My doctor said I had OCD. I couldn’t believe it. I had to call him nine times to make sure. ” — Judy Gold


224. “My father taught me that you can you read a hundred books on wisdom and write a hundred books on wisdom, but unless you apply what you learned then its only words on a page. Life is not lived with intentions, but action.”


225. “My OCD is a speed bumb, not a barrier, to happiness. ” ― Amelia Diane Coombs


226. “My OCD is a speed bumb, not a barrier, to happiness.” – Amelia Diane Coombs


227. “My OCD is a speed bump, not a barrier, to happiness. ” ― Amelia Diane Coombs


228. “My OCD is a speed bump, not a barrier, to happiness.”


229. “My OCD is a speed bump, not a barrier, to happiness.” – Amelia Diane Coombs


230. “My OCD is like a never-ending cycle of doubt and fear. ” — Camila Cabello


231. “My recovery from manic depression has been an evolution, not a sudden miracle.” — Patty Duke


232. “No amount of anxiety can change the future. No amount of regret can change the past.” — Karen Salmansohn


233. “No amount of support or generosity justifies someone treating you badly. This includes parents.” — Sarah Crosby


234. “No amount of therapy can or self care can make up for scarcity of food & drink, time, or financial resources.” — Whitney Goodman, LMFT


235. “No one would ever say that someone with a broken arm or a broken leg is less than a whole person, but people say that or imply that all the time about people with mental illness.”


236. “No passion so effectively robs the mind of all its powers of acting and reasoning as fear“


237. “Not having to control or fight OCD can lead to a sense of freedom or lightness. Your energy can then be spent on things that you find meaningful. I often hear people say, ‘My OCD is exhausting. ’” — Marisa T. Mazza


238. “Not having to control or fight OCD can lead to a sense of freedom or lightness. Your energy can then be spent on things that you find meaningful. I often hear people say, “My OCD is exhausting. ” After working on letting go of control, suddenly people report having more energy. ” – Marisa T. Mazza


239. “Not having to control or fight OCD can lead to a sense of freedom or lightness. Your energy can then be spent on things that you find meaningful. I often hear people say, “My OCD is exhausting.” After working on letting go of control, suddenly people report having more energy.”


240. “Not having to control or fight OCD can lead to a sense of freedom or lightness. Your energy can then be spent on things that you find meaningful. I often hear people say, “My OCD is exhausting.” After working on letting go of control, suddenly people report having more energy.” – Marisa T. Mazza


241. “Not only can you not predict the future, you can never be certain what your intentions were in the past. We only ever know what our intentions are right now in this exact moment.”


242. “Not surprisingly, there has been a mismatch between the enormous impact of mental illness and addiction on the public’s health and our society’s limited commitment to addressing these problems.”


243. “Not until we are lost do we begin to understand ourselves” ― Henry David Thoreau


244. “Nothing diminishes anxiety faster than action.” — Walter Anderson


245. “O. C. D. feels like a daily battle with my own brain.” – Unknown


246. “Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is experiencing unwanted intrusive thoughts or urges and repetitive physical or mental behaviors. OCD is associated with anxiety or disgust and has a negative impact on your daily life. ” – Marisa T. Mazza


247. “Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is experiencing unwanted intrusive thoughts or urges and repetitive physical or mental behaviors. OCD is associated with anxiety or disgust and has a negative impact on your daily life.” – Marisa T. Mazza


248. “Obsessive-compulsive disorder is not a quirk or just a habit. You may hear people say, “I’m so OCD” to describe their desire to be neat and tidy. But OCD doesn’t feel like a choice and doesn’t bring a sense of fulfillment and joy. ” – Marisa T. Mazza


249. “OCD also costs money. These costs include money spent on treatment, lost productivity on the job, and lost days at work. Costs of treatment are often high in part because many with OCD don’t get effective treatment for years. They may enter treatment and be too ashamed to tell the therapist their symptoms. Or well-meaning therapists may not be trained to provide effective OCD treatment. ” – Laura L. Smith


250. “OCD can also impact your family and friends. Watching someone suffering from OCD isn’t easy. ” – Marisa T. Mazza


251. “OCD can also impact your family and friends. Watching someone suffering from OCD isn’t easy.” – Marisa T. Mazza


252. “OCD can make people become housebound, like being an agoraphobic, and avoidance can mean that the sufferer is completely paralysed, stuck in one position for literally hours on end. Equally, the avoidance can become both subtle and complicated, so that although it consumes the person’s entire time and effort, the outside observer would notice little wrong. ” – Fiona Challacombe


253. “OCD can manifest itself as quirky behavior, exaggerated fears, or seriously disturbed thinking. Thus, in one instance, the diagnosis of OCD may be assigned to someone with the odd habit of hanging clothes exactly 1. 2 inches apart in the closet, whereas in someone else, OCD may show up as excessive worries about germs and constant hand-washing. Alternatively, OCD could cause someone to check and recheck to see whether the windows and doors are locked, not once or twice but dozens and dozens of times. ” – Laura L. Smith


254. “OCD doesn’t feel like a choice and doesn’t bring a sense of fulfillment and joy.” – Marisa T. Mazza


255. “OCD has many faces. Millions of people are held prisoner by the strange thoughts and feelings caused by this disorder. Between 1 and 2 percent of the worldwide population has OCD. Most people with OCD are bright and intelligent. But doubt, uneasiness, and fear hijack their normally good, logical minds. ” – Laura L. Smith


256. “OCD is a complex and often debilitating disorder the sufferer doesn’t find useful or enjoyable. People suffering from OCD tend to feel high levels of discomfort, often in the form of anxiety, guilt or disgust. ” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


257. “OCD is exactly a self-torturing comfort zone in the form of a loop. You must have to break it first to be free from OCD.” – Unknown


258. “OCD is like a monster living inside my head that I can’t escape from. ” — Unknown


259. “OCD is like a prison, and my thoughts are the bars. ” — Judy Gold


260. “OCD is like having a bully stuck inside your head and nobody else can see it. ” — Krissy McDermott


261. “OCD is like having a bully stuck inside your head and nobody else can see it.” – Krissy McDermott


262. “OCD is not a choice, but recovery is.” – T.J


263. “OCD is not a cute, little thing that makes you particular about things. ” — David Neeleman


264. “OCD is not a disease that bothers; it is a disease that tortures. ” ― J. J. Keeler


265. “OCD is not a disease that bothers; it is a disease that tortures.” – J.J. Keeler


266. “OCD is not a flaw in character, but a malfunction in the brain.” – Unknown


267. “OCD is not a weakness; it’s a battle. ” — Michelle Visage


268. “OCD is not a weakness; it’s a battle.” – Michelle Visage


269. “OCD is NOT cute, fun, quirky desirable, cool, or trendy. OCD is anxiety and guilt-ridden. debilitating, demoralizing, frustrating, embarrassing, exhausting and painful. The next time you think you’re “so OCD” …you’re not. You’re “so misinformed.” – Unknown


270. “OCD is not just a quirky personality trait, it’s a battle that’s fought every day.” – Unknown


271. “OCD is not something you can ignore or push away. It’s a part of who I am. ” — Unknown


272. “OCD is not something you can just ‘get over. ’ It’s a lifelong battle. ” — Justin Timberlake


273. “OCD is on a spectrum: some people may experience severe symptoms, meaning that unwanted thoughts, urges, or compulsions are present most of the time and significantly impair their life. Others may experience mild symptoms of OCD, meaning that the unwanted thoughts, urges, and repetitive behaviors take up some time (at least an hour per day) and impair some areas of their life. Some people may experience unwanted thoughts, urges, compulsions, anxiety or disgust, without it taking up much time or having a major impact on their life. These people may have symptoms of OCD but cannot be diagnosed with OCD, because the unwanted thoughts, urges, and compulsions do not take up at least an hour a day” – Marisa T. Mazza


274. “OCD makes their brains believe that something horrible is about to happen. Some people fear that they left an appliance on and the house will burn down. Others are terrified that they may get infected with some unknown germ. OCD causes good, kind people to believe that they might do something horrible to a child, knock over an elderly person, or run over someone with their car. ” – Laura L. Smith


275. “OCD ranges in severity from causing distress and negatively impacting your everyday routine to being totally debilitating to the point where you’re unable to function normally. ” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


276. “OCD ranges in severity from causing distress and negatively impacting your everyday routine to being totally debilitating to the point where you’re unable to function normally.” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


277. “OCD recovery doesn’t just come to you. You have to make it happen.” – Unknown


278. “OCD thoughts are not the problem. Your choice to take them seriously is the problem.” – Unknown


279. “OCD thoughts can come into your mind but it’s up to you if you pay attention to them.” – Anonymous


280. “OCD, we discovered, is a lot of different things-it’s not just washing your hands; it’s whatever you’re obsessed with. It can be just the way you hold a pen, and you always have to have it a certain way, or you have to eat your food; it depends. ” — Antoine Fuqua


281. “Often during writing, I am compelled by Obsessive compulsive disorder to delete and rewrite a word or sentence over and over again“


282. “Oftentimes, giving in to the OCD means moving further away from your values and the life you want. Your OCD may have been guiding your life for far too long. You now have an alternate path. Are you willing to let your values be your guiding light?” – Marisa T. Mazza


283. “Oh, I’m crazy, all right. I do have plenty of psychoses. Multiple personality, delusional dementia, OCD. I’ve got them all, but most of all, I’m crazy about you. ” — Eoin Colfer


284. “On OCD: “The OCD sufferer may feel they have to do increasingly more of their compulsive behaviour just to feel ‘normal’ just as the addict may need to take increasingly more of a substance to get the same hit.” – Mark Tyrrell


285. “One of the things that baffles me (and there are quite a few) is how there can be so much lingering stigma with regards to mental illness, specifically bipolar disorder. In my opinion, living with manic depression takes a tremendous amount of balls. Not unlike a tour of Afghanistan (though the bombs and bullets, in this case, come from the inside). At times, being bipolar can be an all-consuming challenge, requiring a lot of stamina and even more courage, so if you’re living with this illness and functioning at all, it’s something to be proud of, not ashamed of. They should issue medals along with the steady stream of medication.” — Carrie Fisher


286. “Others imply that they know what it is like to be depressed because they have gone through a divorce, lost a job, or broken up with someone. But these experiences carry with them feelings. Depression, instead, is flat, hollow, and unendurable. It is also tiresome. People cannot abide being around you when you are depressed. They might think that they ought to, and they might even try, but you know and they know that you are tedious beyond belief: you are irritable and paranoid and humorless and lifeless and critical and demanding and no reassurance is ever enough. You’re frightened, and you’re frightening, and you’re ‘not at all like yourself but will be soon,’ but you know you won’t.” ― Kay Redfield Jamison


287. “Over the course of the past decade, there’s been increased willingness to recognize mental health as an essential part of one’s well-being.”


288. “Pain of mind is worse than pain of body.” – Publius Syrus


289. “Pain of mind is worse than pain of body”


290. “Part of my identity is saying no to things I don’t want to do… I check in with myself throughout the day and I say, ‘Do I really want to do this?’ and if the answer is no, then I don’t do it. And you shouldn’t either.” — Lady Gaga


291. “People have this impression that I’m a little kooky, but I’m actually very OCD. ” — Kate Spade


292. “People who live with OCD drag a mental sea anchor around. Obsession is a brake, a source of drag, not a badge of creativity, a mark of genius or an inconvenient side effect of some greater function“


293. “People who live with OCD drag a metal sea anchor around. Obsession is a break, a source of drag, not a badge of creativity, a mark of genius or an inconvenient side effect of some greater function. ” ― David Adam


294. “People who live with OCD drag a metal sea anchor around. Obsession is a break, a source of drag, not a badge of creativity, a mark of genius or an inconvenient side effect of some greater function.”


295. “People who live with OCD drag a metal sea anchor around. Obsession is a break, a source of drag, not a badge of creativity, a mark of genius or an inconvenient side effect of some greater function.” – David Adam


296. “People will need help and support either intermittently or continuously, but their mental health experience no more defines them than their sexuality, gender, personality or any other aspect of their identity.”


297. “People with OCD including myself, realize that their seemingly uncontrollable behavior is irrational, but they feel unable to stop it. ” ― Abhijit Naskar


298. “People with OCD including myself, realize that their seemingly uncontrollable behavior is irrational, but they feel unable to stop it.”


299. “People with OCD including myself, realize that their seemingly uncontrollable behavior is irrational, but they feel unable to stop it.” – Abhijit Naskar


300. “People with OCD often have an overinflated sense of responsibility for preventing harm and tend to feel high levels of doubt and uncertainty. A person with OCD tends to know that his behaviours or responses to his obsessions are ridiculous but feels powerless to stop performing them. ” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


301. “People with OCD often wear a mask. On the outside they appear so put together, but on the inside, they are falling apart. ”


302. “People with OCD often wear a mask. On the outside, they appear so put together, but on the inside, they are falling apart. ” — Marisa T. Mazza


303. “People with OCD suffer. They are more likely than others to have other emotional disorders such as depression or anxiety. Due to embarrassment, they often keep their symptoms secret for years, which prevents them from seeking treatment. Worldwide, it is estimated that almost 60 percent of people with OCD never get help. ” – Laura L. Smith


304. “People with OCD, including myself, realize that their seemingly uncontrollable behavior is irrational, but they feel unable to stop it. ” ― Abhijit Naskar


305. “People without OCD also experience doubt. They demand certainty in what is almost always an uncertain world. For example, how certain can you be that the sun will come up tomorrow? Almost 100 percent certain, but there is an extremely remote possibility that the sun will implode. For people with OCD, that doubt may keep them up at night. Thus, the remote chance that a door is unlocked, even though a person recalls locking it, would nag at a person with OCD and literally cause a desperate need to recheck repeatedly. ” – Laura L. Smith


306. “People without OCD commonly have moments of doubt – ‘Did I turn my hair-straightener off?’ – that lead them to double-check. This tendency is part of being human and doesn’t mean you have OCD. If, on the other hand, you repeatedly check the item in an attempt to feel absolutely certain, then you may well have OCD. ” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


307. “Perfection I’ve lived with the pretense of perfection for seventeen years. Give my room a cursory inspection; you’d think I have OCD. But it’s only habit and not an obsession that keeps it all orderly. Of course, I don’t want to give the impression that it’s all up to me. ” Ellen Hopkins


308. “Perhaps you’ve heard “You don’t look sick,” “Don’t worry, relax,” or “That’s not rational” when you’ve told people you have OCD. If it were only that easy! You may feel misunderstood, like people don’t get how much you are suffering. ” – Marisa T. Mazza


309. “Personality is a slot machine, and the cherries, lemons, and bells are your SSRI system, your schizophrenic tendency, your left/right brain lobalization, your anxiety proclivity, your wiring glitches, your place on the autistic and OCD spectrums - and to these we must add the deep-level influences of the machines and systems of intelligence that guided your brain into maturity.”


310. “Picture standing in a room filled with flies and pouring a bottle of syrup over yourself. The flies constantly swarm about you, buzzing around your head and in your face. You swat and swat, but they keep coming. The flies are like obsessional thoughts — you can’t stop them, you just have to fend them off. The swatting is like compulsions — you can’t resist the urge to do it, even though you know it won’t really keep the flies at bay more than for a brief moment. ” — Cheryl Little Sutton


311. “Pretty hard to see when you refuse to look. Pretty hard to hear when you refuse to listen.”


312. “Promise me you’ll always remember — you’re braver than you believe, and stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think.” — Christopher Robin from Winnie the Pooh


313. “Rationally, you may know that what the OCD is saying is unlikely, maybe even untrue; however, there is always the chance that something you’re afraid of might happen, so it’s scary. ” – Marisa T. Mazza


314. “Rationally, you may know that what the OCD is saying is unlikely, maybe even untrue; however, there is always the chance that something you’re afraid of might happen, so it’s scary.” – Marisa T. Mazza


315. “Rationally, you may know that what the OCD is saying is unlikely, maybe even untrue; however, there is always the chance that something you’re afraid of might happen. ” ― Marisa T. Mazza


316. “Recovery from OCD is possible. Keep fighting, keep pushing, and most importantly, keep believing in yourself. ” — Sheila Murray Bethel


317. “Recovery from OCD is possible. Keep fighting, keep pushing, and most importantly, keep believing in yourself.” – Sheila Murray Bethel


318. “Refuse to act on an obsession, and it will die of inaction”


319. “Religious obsessions can come in the form of blasphemous thoughts. Some people with OCD worry that they might shout out swear words during a religious ceremony. Others have repeated sexual images of contemporary spiritual leaders or even historical religious figures. Some have repeated phrases, such as “god damn,” popping into their thoughts throughout the day. These obsessions are accompanied by feelings of profound dread and shame. The person tries to neutralize or undo the feelings of intense guilt by resorting to compulsive prayers or rituals. ” – Laura L. Smith


320. “Rest assured that people with OCD are just as normal as those without! We use the word normal to refer to someone without OCD only because it’s what we often hear OCD sufferers say. ” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


321. “Rule your mind or it will rule you.” – Horace


322. “Ruminating on OCD obsession is like praying for something you don’t want.” – Unknown


323. “Running in Central Park is my favorite thing to wake up and do. I have my own specific path that I have to run every single time. There’s a little bit of OCD involved, but I love it. ” — Nate Ruess


324. “Self-compassion is simply giving the same kindness to ourselves that we would give to others.” – Christopher Germer


325. “Sensitive people usually love deeply and hate deeply. They don't know any other way to live than by extremes because thier emotional theromastat is broken.”


326. “Slow, deep breathing is important… It’s like an anchor in the midst of an emotional storm: the anchor won’t get rid of the storm, but it will hold you steady until it passes.”


327. “So many people look at [my depression] as me being ungrateful, but that is not it — I can’t help it. There’s not much that I’m closed off about, and the universe gave me all that so I could help people feel like they don’t have to be something they’re not or feel like they have to fake happy. There’s nothing worse than being fake happy.” — Miley Cyrus


328. “Some people have described their OCD like a “brain itch” or a “brain hiccup. ” In other words, OCD can feel impossible to suppress. ” – Laura L. Smith


329. “Some people have described their OCD like a “brain itch” or a “brain hiccup.” In other words, OCD can feel impossible to suppress.” – Laura L. Smith


330. “Someone asked me recently, what it is like to live with OCD. I paused for a while and said, imagine watching your sibling getting run over by a truck in front of your eyes, not once, not twice, but repeatedly like in a looped video, or your child getting beaten up at school, or your partner getting abused by strangers on the street – and the only way you can stop that event from happening is to keep on repeating the task that you were carrying out when the vision first appeared in your mind, until some other less emotionally agonizing thought breaks the loop of that particular vision and replaces it – and though you know, it’s just a thought and not the destiny of the people you love, you feel it excruciatingly necessary to keep repeating the task until the thought passes, so that nothing bad happens to your loved ones – and that’s what it is like inside the head of a person with OCD, every moment of their life. ” ― Abhijit Naskar


331. “Sometimes the people around you won’t understand your journey. They don’t need to, it’s not for them.” — Joubert Botha


332. “Sometimes you climb out of bed in the morning and you think, I’m not going to make it, but you laugh inside — remembering all the times you’ve felt that way.” — Charles Bukowski


333. “Sometimes, I think about what would happen if you were gone. If I woke up from charging overnight and you weren't here. I would look around for you, calling your name. I wouldn't find you. I would be alone. that would make me sad. ... I know you would never leave me behind, but I think about it. I don't mean to. Why am I like that?”


334. “Sometimes, when seen from the outside, the problem of OCD can seem extreme, bizarre and so far from ‘normality’ as to appear ‘mad’; this is, of course, one of the factors which stops people seeing the disorder for what it is and getting the right knowledge to fight the problem effectively. ” – Fiona Challacombe


335. “Start listening to the way you talk to yourself. These interactions will tell you how well you know yourself, how much you respect yourself, and what boundaries you are lacking.” — Sara Kuburic


336. “Stigma and self-stigma are some of the most significant barriers surrounding mental health. Pervasive stigma is defined as a negative attitude towards a condition or person which leads to negative action or discrimination.”


337. “Take a deep breath to remember you are the child who lived through survival mode and the empowered adult who chose their healing.” — Dr. Nicole LePera


338. “Tell your heart that the fear of suffering is worse than the suffering itself. And that no heart has ever suffered when it goes in search of its dreams.” – Paulo Coelho


339. “Telling someone with OCD to stop obsessing about something is like telling someone who’s having an asthma attack to just breathe normally. ” ― Tamara Ireland Stone


340. “Telling someone with OCD to stop obsessing about something is like telling someone who’s having an asthma attack to just breathe normally.”


341. “Telling someone with OCD to stop obsessing about something is like telling someone who’s having an asthma attack to just breathe normally.” – Tamara Ireland Stone


342. “That was the crux. You. Only you could work on you. Nobody could force you, and if you weren’t ready, then you weren’t ready, and no amount of open-armed encouragement was going to change that.” ― Norah Vincent


343. “The acknowledgement of having suffered evil is the greatest step forward in mental health.” ― Stefan Molyneux


344. “The advice I’d give to somebody that’s silently struggling is, you don’t have to live that way. You don’t have to struggle in silence. You can be un-silent. You can live well with a mental health condition, as long as you open up to somebody about it, because it’s really important you share your experience with people so that you can get the help that you need.” — Demi Lovato


345. “The basis of your life is Freedom; the purpose of your life is Joy.”


346. “The best thing you could do is master the chaos in you. You are not thrown into the fire, you are the fire.” — Mama Indigo


347. “The best way out is always through.” – Robert Frost


348. “The better you get at acting against your OCD, the easier ignoring it is. The easier ignoring it is, the less it bothers you. The less it bothers you, the easier it is to act against it and get on with more important things in your life!” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


349. “The content of the thoughts that others just had very fleetingly was remarkably similar to the thoughts that troubled people with OCD. The fact that ‘normal’ people experience all sorts of negative ‘intrusive thoughts’ is a very important fact to remember. ” – Fiona Challacombe


350. “The experience I have had is that once you start talking about [experiencing a mental health struggle], you realize that actually you’re part of quite a big club.” — Prince Harry


351. “The first thing to remember about...OCD is that the horrible and disgusting "abnormal" thoughts are actually totally normal. The problem has to do with how the thoughts are presented and how they are responded to, not with their existence or absence. The OCD mind is a wide open mind, highlighting extreme potentials in any given context. To cherish something is to also be aware of the horror of losing something that you cherish. In other words, as an OCD sufferer, you can't /not/ think about this stuff.”


352. “The first time I saw her,


353. “The gentlest reminder: You might not need to read another self-help book, attend another training, or bookmark another Instagram post as much as you need to listen to, trust, and practice what you already know. What if the answer you’re looking for is actually within you already?” — Lisa Olivera


354. “The humanity we all share is more important than the mental illnesses we may not” ― Elyn R. Saks


355. “The key to beating OCD is in learning to habituate to the distressing feelings that come with it so that in time the stimuli no longer produce these feelings. ” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


356. “The key to beating OCD is in learning to habituate to the distressing feelings that come with it so that in time the stimuli no longer produce these feelings.” – Katie d’Ath & Rob Willson


357. “The less you open your heart to others, the more your heart suffers.”


358. “The most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss, and have found their way out of the depths. These persons have an appreciation, a sensitivity, and an understanding of life that fills them with compassion, gentleness, and a deep loving concern. Beautiful people do not just happen.” — Elisabeth Kübler-Ross


359. “The most likely thing your certainty-demanding OCD demon will say to any list of obsessions is ‘It’s not quite the same as mine; what if something more dang