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125 Inspirational Kintsugi Quotes To Heal A Broken Heart

1. "The scars are the design. Your attention is drawn to the cracks and how they are mended. That is what you’re supposed to see. The beauty is in the brokenness." - Justin Whitmel Earley


2. “Kintsugi is a Japanese art, that takes broken pottery and delicately places it back together by sealing the cracks with gold lacquer. I found myself admiring the metaphor it represents.


3. Kintsugi, the art of beautiful imperfection. ~Unknownquotes about kintsugi


4. “Ask kin-tsugi, the Japanese art of "golden joinery," in which a broken bowl is fixed and seamed with glow, cracks to the forefront, filled in by gold, rendering the repaired thing more remarkable, honoring its shatter. The result is neither broken nor unbroken, but both at once, shadow, object, corona around an eclipsed sun.


5. “God uses our brokenness to make us even more beautiful. It’s the place of brokenness where God comes in to restore and renew.” – James Prescott


6. “It’s not what people are showing that’s worrying, it’s what they are concealing and the extent of the concealment.”


7. “One of the key principles in Kintsugi is “Kansha” or expressing gratitude. As part of my pledge is to continuously design interventions and activities that will make the whole organization intentional in giving gratitude for their work, their colleagues and their leaders. By building this culture and mindset, I can contribute in helping the organization develop self leaders who are more positive, resilient, adaptable to change and continuous growth.” – Denise Escanillas Ramos


8. “They call it kintsugi. The pot is shattered, then carefully reassembled with a resin mixed with gold. It symbolizes how we must incorporate our wounds into who we are, rather than try to merely repair and forget them.”


9. “...in repairing the object you really ended up loving it more, because you now knew its eagerness to be reassembled, and in running a fingertip over its surface you alone could feel its many cracks - a bond stronger than mere possession.”


10. “In repairing the object you really ended up loving it more, because you now knew its eagerness to be reassembled, and in running a fingertip over its surface you alone could feel its many cracks – a bond stronger than mere possession.” – Nicholson Baker


11. “If you’re broken, hold until each piece of you heals one again. Life is but a Kintsukuroi.” – Samara Rhea Samuel


12. In repairing the object you really ended up loving it more, because you now knew its eagerness to be reassembled, and in running a fingertip over its surface you alone could feel its many cracks - a bond stronger than mere possession.


13. “You are more beautiful because you have been broken.”


14. Kintsugi is based on the belief that something broken is stronger and more beautiful because of its imperfections, the history attached to it, and its altered state.


15. It’s not what people are showing that’s worrying, it’s what they are concealing and the extent of the concealment.


16. “Over the years, my family and I have communicated and miscommunicated. But sometimes we found the best answer was simple sho ga nai, just letting something go. Ultimately, I'm grateful to for the struggles and the setbacks we shared together, as they have made us into who we are today. Without those times of turmoil and change, the ups and downs, we would not be able to learn and grow or enrich our lives. The struggles will become your story, And that's the beauty of kintsugi. Your cracks can become the most beautiful part of you.”


17. “The secret to becoming unbreakable is realizing that you are already broken. We all are.” – Brant Menswar


18. “Did you know that pottery can be repaired with gold?” Kami asked. “Then it’s meant to be stronger than before, and more beautiful.” – Sarah Rees Brennan


19. “Sai cosa? Tu hai paura.”


20. The secret to becoming unbreakable is realizing that you are already broken. We all are.” – Brant Menswar


21. Broken pieces and their repair merely contribute to the story of an object, they don’t ruin it. ~Penny Reid


22. The struggles will become your story, And that's the beauty of Kintsugi. Your cracks can become the most beautiful part of you.


23. “The Japanese art of kintsugi, or “golden joinery,” a method of repairing cracked pottery with a vein of lacquer mixed with gold or silver. A plausible origin story dates this art to the fifteenth century, when Japanese shogun Ashikaga Yoshimasa broke his favorite tea bowl and sent it back to China to be repaired. It was returned with ugly metal staples, prompting the shogun to order his craftsmen to find a more aesthetic means of repair. I love the idea that an accident can be an occasion to make something more delightful, not less so.” – Ingrid Fetell Lee, Joyful: The Surprising Power of Ordinary Things to Create Extraordinary Happiness


24. Why be broken when you can be gold? ~Sarah Rees Brennankintsugi sayings


25. “Crisis es una palabra rara: se queda igual en singular y plural. Y así, para Caro, esta era sólo una crisis de su hermana menor mientras, para mí, bajo esa palabrita, se guardaban cientos de malas decisiones.”


26. “Now, almost every week, we talk about kintsugi pottery. Kintsugi is the Japanese art of repairing a broken bowl by inlaying gold or other precious metals. The new bowl is stronger than the old one. The scars are the design. Your attention is drawn to the cracks and how they are mended. That is what you’re supposed to see. The beauty is in the brokenness.”


27. “Crack allow the light to get in.”


28. “The bonded seams become an intrinsic part of the ceramic and add a personalized, one-of-a-kind beauty through its imperfections.” – Jo Ann V. Glim


29. “In his TedX Talk, Gary Lewandowski explains the concept of kintsugi. It refers to a Japanese art form in which broken pottery is put back together using precious metals like gold and silver. The repair pottery is often more beautiful than it was before it was damaged. Lewandowski encourages us to see heartbreak as art break. It’s also a philosophy which treats damage and its repairs as an opportunity - something to take advantage of, not to conceal.”


30. The scars are the design. Your attention is drawn to the cracks and how they are mended. That is what you’re supposed to see. The beauty is in the brokenness.


31. “Unlike other methods of repair, like welding or glueing, kintsugi’s power was in its refusal to disguise the brokenness of an object, he said. It did not aim to make what was broken as good as new, but to use the cracks to transform the object into something different, and arguably even more valuable.”


32. “My heart full of gold veins, instead of cracks.” – Leah Raeder


33. “I sit and pick up those pieces with their renewed essence and identities, with their flawed edges and imperfections, and join them together like Kintsugi, displaying the damages with pride.” – Rubina


34. “Just like the art of Kintsugi, he knew the art of fixing up broken people with the lacquer of his golden words.”


35. “Golden Healing: Kintsugi is the Japanese art of repairing broken objects with gold. Because the ‘flaw’ reveals its history, the resulting piece is considered more beautiful. Your healing is your story. Mend yourself with love.”


36. “Kintsugi symbolizes how we must incorporate our wounds into who we are, rather than try to merely repair and forget them." – David Wong


37. A break is something to remember, something of value, a way to make the piece more beautiful, rather than something to disguise. They use gold, not invisible superglue because mistakes shouldn’t be considered ugly.


38. "Kintsugi [is] not just a method of repair but also a philosophy. It’s the belief that the breaks, cracks, and repairs become a valuable and esteemed part of the history of an object, rather than something to be hidden. That, in fact, the piece is more beautiful for having been broken. - Kathleen Tessaro


39. Why be broken when you can be gold?


40. “It symbolizes how we must incorporate our wounds into who we are, rather than try to merely repair and forget them.” – David Wong


41. “So much was lost - names, faces, ages, ethnic identities - that African Americans must do what no other ethnic group writ large must do: take a completely shattered vessel and piece it together, knowing that some pieces will never be recovered. This is not quite as harrowing or hopeless as it might sound I liken it to the Japanese art of kintsugi, repairing broken vessels using gold. The scars of the object are not concealed, but highlighted and embraced, thus giving them their own dignity and power. The brokenness and its subsequent repair are a recognized part of the story of the journey of the vessel, not to be obscured, and change, transition, and transformation are seen as important as honoring the original structure and its traditional meaning and beauty.”


42. “Kintsugi,' zei opa. 'Zo heet de techniek waarmee je een perfecte imperfectie maakt. Als je gebroken bent betekent dat niet automatisch dat je lelijk bent. Na een breuk ontstaat er ruimte. Dat is de plek voor het goud. Als je het een kans geeft maakt het je mooier dan je ooit bent geweest.”


43. “Kintsugi: Built on the idea that in embracing flaws and imperfections, you can create an even stronger, more beautiful piece of art.”


44. “Kintsugi.”45. If you're broken, hold until each piece of you heals one again. Life is but a Kintsukuroi.


46. “World is imperfect. Life is imperfect. You are imperfect. I’m imperfect. All are Kintsugi.”


47. “Japanese potters developed the kintsugi repair technique where they use a compound that includes molten gold to rejoin the broken clay pieces. The repaired pieces are made useful once again, and often become lovelier than they were in their original form. Kintsugi is a wonderful picture of the way God restores broken hearts. He doesn’t erase the evidence or memory of heartbreak. Instead, he makes it beautiful and repurposes us for new uses.”


48. Kintsugi [is] not just a method of repair but also a philosophy. It’s the belief that the breaks, cracks, and repairs become a valuable and esteemed part of the history of an object, rather than something to be hidden. That, in fact, the piece is more beautiful for having been broken.


49. “The point of Kintsugi is to treat broken pieces and their repair as part of the history of an object.” – Penny Reid


50. “That’s the question the world is asking sometimes. It knows we’re brave, so it wants to know: Death or kintsugi? Will you find a way to become stronger at the broken places? Or will you so cling to your old ways that you will be shattered? A hero gets back up. They heal. They grow. For themselves and others.”


51. “If you are broken today.


52. “In the language of delicate perception Kintsugi is the art of mending what is broken. The Emperor’s plate is smashed. Death and despair! Yet here is powdered gold and platinum, with resin bled from Chinese lacquer trees to run in cracks and make it whole again. For my poor love I cannot find repair without a balm more powerful than these.” – Roy Ernest Ballard


53. “Kintsugi [is] not just a method of repair but also a philosophy. It’s the belief that the breaks, cracks, and repairs become a valuable and esteemed part of the history of an object, rather than something to be hidden. That, in fact, the piece is more beautiful for having been broken.”


54. Kintsugi: “Embrace your imperfections and find happiness – the Japanese way.” ~Tomas Navarro


55. “Paint your cracks with gold, let them add to your beauty.”


56. “Why be broken when you can be gold?” – Sarah Rees Brennan


57. Broken pieces and their repair merely contribute to the story of an object, they don’t ruin it.


58. “The Japanese art form of kintsugi repairs broken and flawed pottery with gold, silver or platinum. It doesn’t hide the cracks, but embraces it, seeing it as integral to the object’s history, and rebuilds something new.” – Sidhanta Patnaik, The Fire Burns Blue: A History of Women’s Cricket in India


59. “Ada luka sumbing serupa gempil bibir poci di hati semua orang. Cacat yang berusaha keras mereka sembunyikan dari dunia. Tapi tak semestinya kita mengenakan topeng hanya demi menutup secebis luka. Tak semua hal mesti kita cerna dengan tatapan mata curiga serupa itu. Maka dari itu, coba dengarkan apa kata Bundamu ini, Nak. Manusia tak perlu harus jadi sempurna agar ia dihargai. Sebagaimana keindahan bisa muncul dari hal kecil dan sederhana. Termasuk apa yang tampak pada selembar kain batik yang lusuh atau cangkir teh yang somplak ujungnya.


60. “Kintsugi is the Japanese art of mending broken objects using gold of silver epoxy. The Japanese believe that when something has suffered damage and has a history, it becomes more beautiful.”


61. “Kintsugi, the art of beautiful imperfection.”


62. “La vita è imperfetta, noi siamo essere imperfetti e fragili, la nostra speranza di controllare e indirizzare le cose, la spinta a ricercare una perfezione in noi e in ciò che ci circonda, è pura e stupida illusione. Dovremmo semplicemente accettare le fragilità, accettare l’idea che dall’imperfezione possa nascere qualcosa di piú evoluto, renderle omaggio, come fa quella tecnica giapponese, il Kintsugi, letteralmente «riparare con l’oro», che usa il prezioso metallo per tenere insieme i cocci rotti. Ogni ceramica riparata sarà originale e inimitabile, perché le crepe non potranno mai essere uguali (a proposito dell’entropia). Gli sbagli, le imperfezioni e le fragilità ci arricchiscono, ci rendono unici, piú interessanti. Di piú, ci proteggono. Se il codice genetico di ognuno si riproducesse senza errori (piccole falle nel sistema), i nostri figli sarebbero fotocopie perfette di noi stessi e, come tali, soggetti alle medesime malattie, con gli stessi punti deboli. Gli errori che commette il Dna (le cosiddette mutazioni) nel riprodursi sono la nostra salvezza, perché ci diversificano l’uno dall’altro, garantiscono la variabilità genetica, in base alla quale alcuni si fortificano e riescono a sopravvivere. Se fossimo tutti uguali, al contrario, basterebbe un niente a cancellarci dalla faccia della Terra. Se fossimo asessuati (come le piante, o anche alcuni insetti e crostacei), se non ci riproducessimo cioè attraverso il sesso, che rimescola il gene, saremmo molto piú vulnerabili perché omologati.


63. Kintsugi is a pottery technique. When something breaks, like a vase, they glue it back together with melted gold. Instead of making the cracks invisible, they make them beautiful…To celebrate the history of the object…What it’s been through


64. “Broken pieces and their repair merely contribute to the story of an object, they don’t ruin it.” – Penny Reid


65. “And now every time that it shatters I build it back together better, stronger, with more unique random scars to redefine, to beautify, to create more success stories that I can claim to be mine, alone.” – Rubina


66. If you’re broken, hold until each piece of you heals one again. Life is but a Kintsukuroi. ~Samara Rhea Samuel


67. “The struggles will become your story, And that’s the beauty of Kintsugi. Your cracks can become the most beautiful part of you.” – Candice Kumai


68. “kintsukuroi, or the “golden repair” of something treasured or important that has become cracked or broken. When applied to the repair of ancient and valuable pieces of pottery, the practice becomes kintsugi, or “golden joinery.” The key to this imaginative art appears when the glue used to fill the cracks and join the broken pieces becomes blended with actual gold. After the repairs have been made, the broken vessel becomes more valuable than ever. Metaphorically, kintsugi suggests that”


69. “Kintsugi is based on the belief that something broken is stronger and more beautiful because of its imperfections, the history attached to it, and its altered state. Instead of hiding what’s been damaged, the shards are mended with a special resin mixed with gold dust. The bonded seams become an intrinsic part of the ceramic and add a personalized, one-of-a-kind beauty through its imperfections.”


70. My heart full of gold veins, instead of cracks.


71. The struggles will become your story, And that’s the beauty of Kintsugi. Your cracks can become the most beautiful part of you. ~Candice Kumai


72. “The Japanese art form of kintsugi repairs broken and flawed pottery with gold, silver or platinum. It doesn’t hide the cracks, but embraces it, seeing it as integral to the object’s history, and rebuilds something new.”


73. “Kintsugi is a form of art embodying “Wabi Sabi” which is a word to appreciate Japanese aesthetic sensibilities. (Wabi Sabi which represents “beauty within simplicity and imperfection”) “Nothing lasts forever, nothing is complete, nothing is perfect. Your scar is important part of your life and is a part of you. It is a living history, never look scars as negative, instead take it as positive.” – Shawzi Tsukanoto


74. “Io non sono geloso.”


75. The bonded seams become an intrinsic part of the ceramic and add a personalized, one-of-a-kind beauty through its imperfections.


76. “The Universe has faith in you even if you don't.' the Gypsy Queen said, 'That why I am here, to be a thread of your tapestry, even you couldn't see the whole picture quite just yet.”


77. Kintsugi is based on the belief that something broken is stronger and more beautiful because of its imperfections, the history attached to it, and its altered state.” – Jo Ann V. Glim


78. “Le llaman kintsugi. Sí, como el álbum de los Death Cab for Cutie.”


79. To become beautiful it had to break.


80. “To become beautiful it had to break.” – Aura Trevortini


81. “Nunca supe elegir. Siempre me iba con los que me adoraban por cinco minutos o los que me aburrían por tres años. Sin puntos intermedios. Algún día tendría que aprender.”


82. “Kintsugi: “Embrace your imperfections and find happiness – the Japanese way.”” – Tomas Navarro


83. “Alice recalled one of the books Dylan had read to her, a collection of Japanese fairytales. In one, a woman artist practiced kintsugi, repairing broken pottery with lacquer mixed with powdered gold. There'd been an illustration of a woman bent over a pile of broken pottery pieces, laid out to fit together, with a fine paintbrush in her hand, its bristles dipped in gold. It had enchanted Alice, the idea that breakage and repair were part of the story, not something to be disdained or disguised.”


84. Did you know that pottery can be repaired with gold? Kami asked. Then it's meant to be stronger than before, and more beautiful.


85. “Kintsugi is based on the belief that something broken is stronger and more beautiful because of its imperfections, the history attached to it, and its altered state. Instead of hiding what’s been damaged, the shards are mended with a special resin mixed with gold dust. The bonded seams become an intrinsic part of the ceramic and add a personalized, one-of-a-kind beauty through its imperfections.” – Jo Ann V. Glim, Begotten With Love: Every Family Has Its Story


86. “My heart is full of gold veins, instead of cracks.” – Leah Rider


87. “Kintsugi: The ancient Japanese art of mending broken objects with gold teaches us that if we choose to embrace our struggles and repair ourselves with love. We become more beautiful for having been broken.”


88. “Quién sabe por qué decidimos querer a quien queremos y a quien dejamos que nos haga daño.”


89. “Kintsugi is a pottery technique. When something breaks, like a vase, they glue it back together with melted gold. Instead of making the cracks invisible, they make them beautiful. To celebrate the history of the object. What it's been through. And I was just... Thinking of us like that. My heart full of gold veins, instead of cracks.”


90. “Did you know that pottery can be repaired with gold?" Kami asked. "Then it's meant to be stronger than before, and more beautiful. Which is awesome, though it seems expensive."


91. “Everybody needs friends who uplift them. Assess who makes you feel good, and look to those people for support when you're grappling with a situation that cannot be helped.”


92. “Only when one is free to choose, one can be responsible for one’s actions.”


93. “the point of kintsugi is to treat broken pieces and their repair as part of the history of an object. A break is something to remember, something of value, a way to make the piece more beautiful, rather than something to disguise. They use gold, not invisible superglue, because mistakes shouldn’t be considered ugly. Broken pieces and their repair merely contribute to the story of an object, they don’t ruin it.”


94. “All beautiful things carry distinctions of imperfection. Your wounds and imperfections are your beauty. Like the broken pottery mended with gold, we are all Kintsugi. Its philosophy and art state that breakage and mending are honest parts of a past which should not be hidden. Your wounds and healing are a part of your history; a part of who you are. Every beautiful thing is damaged. You are that beauty; we all are.” – Bryant McGill


95. And now every time that it shatters I build it back together better, stronger, with more unique random scars to redefine, to beautify, to create more success stories that I can claim to be mine, alone.


96. "Why be broken when you can be gold?" - Sarah Rees Brennan


97. I sit and pick up those pieces with their renewed essence and identities, with their flawed edges and imperfections, and join them together like Kintsugi, displaying the damages with pride.


98. “It’s not what people are showing that’s worrying, it’s what they are concealing and the extent of the concealment.” – Et Imperatrix Noctem


99. “Kintsugi: stronger and more beautiful in the broken places.”


100. “art of kintsugi.”


101. “I am looking forward to getting shattered only to add further elegance to myself.” – Aura Trevortini


102. The point of Kintsugi is to treat broken pieces and their repair as part of the history of an object. ~Penny Reid


103. “Nada se va hasta que te ha enseñado todo lo que necesitabas aprender. Y llegará el día en que ya no recuerde cómo me besabas el hombro cuando creías que estaba dormida.”


104. “Kintsugi is a pottery technique. When something breaks, like a vase, they glue it back together with melted gold. Instead of making the cracks invisible, they make them beautiful…To celebrate the history of the object….What it’s been through. And I was just… Thinking of us like that.” – Leah Raeder


105. “Kintsugi is based on the belief that something broken is stronger and more beautiful because of its imperfections, the history attached to it, and its altered state.” – Jo Ann V. Glim


106. “Fear paralyses the mind, my son. What will come will come.”


107. I am looking forward to getting shattered only to add further elegance to myself.


108. It symbolizes how we must incorporate our wounds into who we are, rather than try to merely repair and forget them.


109. God uses our brokenness to make us even more beautiful. It’s the place of brokenness where God comes in to restore and renew.” – James Prescott


110. “In Japan broken objects are often repaired with gold. The flaw is seen as a unique piece of the object’s history, which adds to its beauty. Consider this when you feel broken.”


111. “Kintsugi, the Japanese art of embracing the imperfect and loving your flaws.”


112. “The scars are the design. Your attention is drawn to the cracks and how they are mended. That is what you’re supposed to see. The beauty is in the brokenness.” – Justin Whitmel Earley


113. “I can see the immense force coursing through your veins, both life-giving and life-taking, promising and terrifying at the same time.”


114. “The gold veins on the cover represent the Japanese art of kintsugi, “golden repair,” in which pieces of broken pottery are mended with powdered gold and lacquer, rather than treating the breaks as blemishes to conceal. The technique shows us that although an object cannot be returned to its original state, fragments can be made whole again.”


115. The point of Kintsugi is to treat broken pieces and their repair as part of the history of an object.


116. “When we live intensely, we run more risks and we become more fragile.


117. “"A break is something to remember, something of value, a way to make the piece more beautiful, rather than something to disguise. They use gold, not invisible superglue because mistakes shouldn’t be considered ugly." – Penny Reid


118. “before I could speak. “It’s a book on how to do kintsugi. It’s a Japanese method of fixing broken pottery with lacquer dusted or mixed with powdered gold.”


119. “Kintsugi [is] not just a method of repair but also a philosophy. It’s the belief that the breaks, cracks, and repairs become a valuable and esteemed part of the history of an object, rather than something to be hidden. That, in fact, the piece is more beautiful for having been broken.” – Kathleen Tessaro


120. “The secret to becoming unbreakable is realizing that you are already broken. We all are.”


121. It symbolizes how we must incorporate our wounds into who we are, rather than try to merely repair and forget them. ~David Wong


122. “Kintsugi, the Japanese art of repairing cracked pottery with gold, and knowing that the brokeness can make an object even more beautiful.”


123. “A break is something to remember, something of value, a way to make the piece more beautiful, rather than something to disguise. They use gold, not invisible superglue because mistakes shouldn’t be considered ugly.” – Penny Reid


124. “Wabi sabi: “flawed beauty”; beauty that is “imperfect, impermanent and incomplete”; looking for beauty within the imperfections of life, being at peace with the universal cycle of growth and decay.”


125. Kintsugi is a pottery technique. When something breaks, like a vase, they glue it back together with melted gold. Instead of making the cracks invisible, they make them beautiful...To celebrate the history of the object....What it's been through. And I was just... Thinking of us like that.

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