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800 Best Pride and Prejudice Quotes by Jane Austen

1. “I am happier even than Jane; she only smiles, I laugh.”


2. “I am,” said he, with a firm voice.


3. “In nine cases out of ten, a woman had better show more affection than she feels.”


4. “Your defect is a propensity to hate everybody.” “And yours,” he replied with a smile, “is willfully to misunderstand them.”


5. “Estás deseando decirlo y no tengo inconveniente en escucharlo.”


6. “My courage always rises with every attempt to intimidate me”


7. “What praise is more valuable than the praise of an intelligent servant?”


8. “I hope not.”


9. “Had it been your uncle's doing, I must and would have paid him; but these violent young lovers carry everything their own way. I shall offer to pay him to-morrow; he will rant and storm about his love for you, and there will be an end of the matter.”


10. “You shall not, for the sake of one individual, change the meaning of principle and integrity, nor endeavour to persuade yourself or me, that selfishness is prudence, and insensibility of danger security for happiness. ” - Elizabeth Bennet


11. “Laugh as much as you choose, but you will not laugh me out of my opinion. ” – Chapter 17


12. Till this moment I never knew myself.


13. “Es gran lectora, y no encuentra placer en otra cosa.”


14. “I am now convinced, my dear aunt, that I have never been much in love; for had I really experienced that pure and elevating passion, I should at present detest his very name, and wish him all manner of evil. ” – Chapter 26


15. To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love.


16. “We all know him to be a proud, unpleasant sort of man; but this would be nothing if you really liked him.”


17. “It is very often nothing but our own vanity that deceives us. ”


18. “Mr. Darcy sends you all the love in the world that he can spare from me.”


19. “Estaba meditando sobre el gran placer que pueden causar un par de ojos bonitos en el rostro de una mujer hermosa.”


20. “Well, my dear," said Mr. Bennet, when Elizabeth had read the note aloud, "if your daughter should have a dangerous fit of illness—if she should die, it would be a comfort to know that it was all in pursuit of Mr. Bingley, and under your orders.”


21. “Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us. ” - Mary Bennet


22. “You are over-scrupulous, surely. I dare say Mr. Bingley will be very glad to see you; and I will send a few lines by you to assure him of my hearty consent to his marrying whichever he chooses of the girls; though I must throw in a good word for my little Lizzy.”


23. My situation in life, my connections with the family of de Bourgh, and my relationship to your own, are circumstances highly in my favour.


24. “The power of doing any thing with quickness is always much prized by the possessor, and often without any attention to the imperfection of the performance. - Mr Darcy”


25. “I am determined that only the deepest love will induce me into matrimony. So, I shall end an old maid, and teach your ten children to embroider cushions and play their instruments very ill. ” - Elizabeth Bennet


26. “No comprendo que en estos tiempos se descuide una biblioteca familiar.”


27. “And your defect is to hate everybody.”/“And yours,” he replied with a smile, “is willfully to misunderstand them.


28. “Affectation of candour is common enough—one meets with it everywhere. But to be candid without ostentation or design—to take the good of everybody's character and make it still better, and say nothing of the bad—belongs to you alone. ” - Elizabeth Bennet


29. Kitty, to her very material advantage, spent the chief of her time with her two elder sisters. In society so superior to what she had generally known, her improvement was great.


30. Darcy had never been so bewitched by any woman as he was by her. He really believed, that were it not for the inferiority of her connections, he should be in some danger.


31. “Next to being married, a girl likes to be crossed a little in love now and then. It is something to think of, and it gives her a sort of distinction among her companions. ” - Mr. Bennet


32. “She attracted him more than he liked.”


33. “Nadie puede estimarse realmente perfecto si no sobrepasa en mucho lo que se encuentra normalmente.”


34. “It has been coming on so gradually, that I hardly know when it began. But I believe I must date it from my first seeing his beautiful grounds at Pemberley.”


35. You are mistaken, Mr. Darcy, if you suppose that the mode of your declaration affected me in any other way than as it spared me the concern which I might have felt in refusing you, had you behaved in a more gentlemanlike manner. - Elizabeth Bennet


36. “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a large fortune must be in want of a wife.”


37. I have been a selfish being all my life, in practise, though not in principle... I was given good principles, but left to follow them in pride and conceit. - Jane Austen


38. “When I am in the country, I never wish to leave it; and when I am in town It is pretty much the same. They have each their advantages, and I can be equally happy in either.”


39. “Hay una especie de terquedad en mí, que nunca me permite que me intimide nadie. Por el contrario, mi valor crece cuando alguien intenta intimidarme.”


40. “No lace. No lace, Mrs. Bennett, I beg you!”


41. If you have not been mistaken here, I must have been in error.


42. “Where she feared most to fail, she was most sure of success, for those to whom she endeavored to give pleasure were prepossessed in her favor.”


43. “It’s been many years since I had such an exemplary vegetable.”


44. “Mr. Wickham is blessed with such happy manners as may ensure his making friends - whether he may be equally capable of retaining them is less certain.”


45. “I have had the pleasure of your acquaintance long enough to know that you find great enjoyment in occasionally professing opinions which in fact are not your own.”


46. “In nine cases out of ten a woman had better show more affection than she feels.”


47. “He was the proudest, most disagreeable man in the world, and everybody hoped that he would never come there again.”


48. “Elizabeth's spirit's soon rising to playfulness again, she wanted Mr. Darcy to account for his having ever fallen in love with her. 'How could you begin?' said she.


49. Darcy soon drew the attention of the room by his fine, tall person, handsome features, noble mien, and the report which was in general circulation within five minutes after his entrance, of his having ten thousand a year. – Chapter 3


50. ‘I can answer your question,’ said Fitzwilliam, ‘without applying to him. It is because he will not give himself the trouble.’


51. “Hayırseverliğine hayranım," diye konuştu Mary, " Ama yine de bütün duygusal dürtüler mantıkla yönlendirilmelidir. Şahsen fikrimi sorarsan; insanın harcadığı her emek daima kendisinden talep edilenle doğru orantılı olmalıdır.”


52. “Yes; these four evenings have enabled them to ascertain that they both like Vingt-un better than Commerce; but with respect to any other leading characteristic, I do not imagine that much has been unfolded.”


53. “You mean to frighten me, Mr. Darcy, by coming in all this state to hear me? I will not be alarmed though your sister does play so well. There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me."


54. “My good opinion once lost is lost forever.”


55. “Mr. Darcy drew his chair a little towards her, and said, “You cannot have a right to such very strong local attachment. You cannot have been always at Longbourn.”


56. “but without scheming to do wrong, or to make others unhappy, there may be error, and there may be misery. Thoughtlessness, want of attention to other people's feelings, and want of resolution, will do the business.”


57. “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.” On page 5.


58. It is particularly incumbent on those who never change their opinion, to be secure of judging properly at first.


59. “Si entonces no se acerca a mí, pensaba, me olvidaré de él para siempre.”


60. Do not consider me now as an elegant female intending to plague you, but as a rational creature speaking the truth from her heart.


61. She is tolerable, but not handsome enough to tempt me, and I am in no humor at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men. -Jane Austen


62. “There is a fine old saying, which everybody here is of course familiar with: 'Keep your breath to cool your porridge'; and I shall keep mine to swell my song.”


63. “I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! — When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.”


64. “A lady’s imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony, in a moment.”


65. “A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.”


66. She grew absolutely ashamed of herself. Of neither Darcy nor Wickham could she think without feeling she had been blind, partial, prejudiced, absurd.


67. “My temper would perhaps be called resentful. My good opinion once lost, is lost forever.”


68. “But self, though it would intrude, could not engross her.”


69. “The pause was to Elizabeth's feelings dreadful. At length, with a voice of forced calmness, he said: "And this is all the reply which I am to have the honour of expecting! I might, perhaps, wish to be informed why, with so little endeavour at civility, I am thus rejected. But it is of small importance."


70. “Recuerde sólo en el pasado aquello que le sea grato.”


71. “It is difficult indeed—it is distressing. One does not know what to think. ” “I beg your pardon; one knows exactly what to think. ” – Chapter 17


72. “I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.”


73. “My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me.”


74. “In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.”


75. Mrs. Bennet was beyond the reach of reason, and she continued to rail bitterly against the cruelty of settling an estate away from a family of five daughters, in favour of a man whom nobody cared anything about. – Chapter 13


76. “No, indeed. I do not wish to avoid the walk. The distance is nothing when one has a motive; only three miles.” Elizabeth Bennet


77. “So Lizzy,' said he one day, 'your sister is crossed in love I find. I congratulate her. Next to being married, a girl likes to be crossed in love a little now and then. It is something to think of, and gives her a sort of distinction among her companions.”


78. “Angry people are not always wise.”


79. “A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment.”


80. “—Admiro a quien descubrió la eficacia de la poesía para estimular el amor.


81. “you must know...surely, you must know it was all for you.”


82. “I think you are in very great danger of making him as much in love with you as ever.”


83. “A report of a most alarming nature reached me two days ago.”


84. “How pleasant it is to spend an evening in this way! I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of anything than of a book! When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library. ” – Chapter 11


85. “I have often observed how little young ladies are interested by books of a serious stamp, though written solely for their benefit.” Mr. Collins


86. “sanırım her yaradılışta belli bir kötülüğe doğru eğilim vardır... doğal bir kusur, en iyi eğitim bile üstesinden gelemez."


87. “my good qualities are under your protection, and you are to exaggerate them as much as possible; and, in return, it belongs to me to find occasion for teasing and quarreling with you as often as may be…”


88. “Every impulse of feeling should be guided by reason; and, in my opinion, exertion should always be in proportion to what is required.”


89. “People who suffer as I do from nervous complaints can have no great inclination for talking. Nobody can tell what I suffer! But it is always so. Those who do not complain are never pitied. ” – Chapter 20


90. “He looks miserable poor soul!”


91. He was the cause, his pride and caprice were the cause, of all that Jane had suffered, and still continued to suffer.


92. “I often think,” she said, “that there is nothing so bad as parting with one’s friends. One seems to forlorn without them.”


93. “Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure”


94. She had a lively, playful disposition that delighted in anything ridiculous. -Jane Austen


95. “Do not consider me now as an elegant female intending to plague you, but as a rational creature speaking the truth from her heart.”


96. “Do you talk by rule, then, while you are dancing?”


97. “I certainly have not the talent which some people possess, of conversing easily with those I have never seen before. ”


98. “Had I been in love, I could not have been more wretchedly blind. But vanity, not love, has been my folly. ” - Elizabeth Bennett


99. “She was in no humour for conversation with anyone but himself; and to him she had hardly courage to speak.”


100. Her astonishment however was extreme, and continually was she repeating, ‘Why is he so altered? From what can it proceed? It cannot be for me, it cannot be for my sake that his manners are thus softened.’


101. “El que ella no se lo reproche, no lo justifica a él. Solo demuestra que ella carece de algo, bien de prudencia, bien de sentimiento.”


102. “Pride is a very common failing. . . I am convinced that it is very common indeed; that human nature is particularly prone to it, and that there are very few of us who do not cherish a feeling of self-complacency on the score of some quality or other, real or imaginary. ” - Mary Bennet


103. “One cannot always be laughing at a man without now and then stumbling on something witty. ” – Chapter 40


104. “Pride is a very common failing… I am convinced that it is very common indeed; that human nature is particularly prone to it, and that there are very few of us who do not cherish a feeling of self-complacency on the score of some quality or other, real or imaginary.”


105. Till this moment I never knew myself.-Jane Austen


106. “Her mind was less difficult to develop.”


107. “Oh! Single, my dear, to be sure! A single man of large fortune; four or five thousand a year. What a fine thing for our girls!”


108. To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love. -Jane Austen


109. “We must not be so ready to fancy ourselves intentionally injured… It is very often nothing but our own vanity that deceives us.”


110. It is always incomprehensible to a man that a woman should ever refuse an offer of marriage. A man always imagines a woman to be ready for anybody who asks her. -Jane Austen


111. Every impulse of feeling should be guided by reason; and, in my opinion, exertion should always be in proportion to what is required. - Jane Austen


112. “Mr. Bennet's expectations were fully answered. His cousin was as absurd as he had hoped, and he listened to him with the keenest enjoyment.”


113. “This was invitation enough.”


114. “I heard you before, but I could not immediately determine what to say in reply. You wanted me, I know, to say 'Yes,' that you might have the pleasure of despising my taste; but I always delight in overthrowing those kind of schemes, and cheating a person of their premeditated contempt.”


115. “Of a fine, stout, healthy love it may. Everything nourishes what is strong already. But if it be only a slight, thin sort of inclination, I am convinced that one good sonnet will starve it entirely away.” Elizabeth Bennet


116. “It is particularly incumbent on those who never change their opinion, to be secure of judging properly at first.”


117. “I shall be glad to have the library to myself as soon as may be.”


118. “Implacable resentment is a shade in a


119. In vain I have struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.


120. “You are mistaken, Mr. Darcy, if you suppose that the mode of your declaration affected me in any other way, than as it spared the concern which I might have felt in refusing you, had you behaved in a more gentlemanlike manner.”


121. “I hope I never ridicule what is wise or good. Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies, do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can.” Elizabeth Bennet


122. She is tolerable, but not handsome enough to tempt me.


123. “I wish I might take this for a compliment; but to be so easily seen through I am afraid is pitiful.”


124. “No more have I," said Mr. Bennet; "and I am glad to find that you do not depend on her serving you.”


125. “Mary wished to say something very sensible, but knew not how.”


126. “orgullo está relacionado con la opinión que tenemos de nosotros mismos; la vanidad, con lo que quisiéramos que los demás pensaran de nosotros.”


127. “she cannot expect to excel if she does not practice a good deal.”


128. “I am astonished,” said Miss Bingley, “that my father should have left so small a collection of books.—What a delightful library you have at Pemberley, Mr. Darcy!”


129. “You have chosen your fault well. I really cannot laugh at it. You are safe from me. ” – Chapter 11


130. “Ha de aprender mi filosofía. Del pasado no tiene usted que recordar más que lo placentero. –No”


131. “You must learn some of my philosophy. Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure. ” - Elizabeth Bennet


132. “Nothing is more deceitful than the appearance of humility. It is often only carelessness of opinion and somethings an indirect boast.”


133. “Mr. Bennet, how can you abuse your own children in such a way? You take delight in vexing me. You have no compassion for my poor nerves.


134. “Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure.”


135. “I hope I never ridicule what is wise or good.”


136. Is not general incivility the very essence of love? - Jane Austen


137. “[W]here other powers of entertainment are wanting, the true philosopher will derive benefit from such as are given.”


138. “She told the story, however, with great spirit among her friends; for she had a lively, playful disposition, which delighted in any thing ridiculous.”


139. “Why is he so altered? From what can it proceed? It cannot be for my sake that his manners are thus softened... It is impossible that he should still love me.”


140. I think I have heard you say, that their uncle is an attorney in Meryton. -Jane Austen


141. Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance.- Jane Austen


142. “However, he wrote some verses on her, and very pretty they were.”


143. Such a change in a man of so much pride exciting not only astonishment but gratitude—for to love, ardent love, it must be attributed; and as such its impression on her was of a sort to be encouraged, as by no means unpleasing, though it could not be exactly defined. – Chapter 44


144. “...I cannot say that I regret my comparative insignificance, Importance may sometimes be purchased too dearly.”


145. “Of a fine, stout, healthy love it may. Everything nourishes what is strong already. But if it be only a slight, thin sort of inclination, I am convinced that one good sonnet will starve it entirely away.”


146. “The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and everyday confirms my belief of the inconsistencies of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.”


147. “Could there be finer symptoms? Is not general incivility the very essence of love?” - Elizabeth Bennet


148. marriage had always been her object; it was the only provision for well-educated young women of small fortune, and however uncertain of giving happiness, must be their pleasantest preservative from want.


149. “And yours,” he replied, with a smile, “is wilfully to misunderstand them.” Mr. Darcy


150. “I must learn to be content with being happier than I deserve.”


151. “We must not be so ready to fancy ourselves intentionally injured... It is very often nothing but our own vanity that deceives us.”


152. “What are men compared to rocks and trees?”


153. “As a brother, a landlord, a master, she considered how many people's happiness were in his guardianship! -- How much of pleasure or pain it was in his power to bestow! -- How much of good or evil must be done by him!”


154. “You have bewitched me, body and soul, and I love, I love, I love you. I never wish to be parted from you from this day on”


155. Darcy, and More


156. Lydia will never be easy until she has exposed herself in some public place or other, and we can never expect her to do it with so little expense or inconvenience to her family as under the present circumstances.


157. “You must learn some of my philosophy. Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure. ” – Chapter 58


158. You are too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes are unchanged, but one word from you will silence me on this subject forever. -Jane Austen


159. “If a woman is partial to a man, and does not endeavour to conceal it, he must find it out.”


160. “There certainly was some great mismanagement in the education of those two young men. One has got all the goodness, and the other all the appearance of it. ” – Chapter 40


161. Now be sincere; did you admire me for my impertinence?'


162. “Ansiaba su estima cuando ya no podía esperar obtenerla; necesitaba oirlo cuando no parecía existir la menor probabilidad de avenencia; estaba convencida de que habría sido dichosa a su lado, cuando no era probable que se produjera un nuevo encuentro entre ambos.”


163. “it is often nothing but our own vanity that decieves us”


164. “For herself she was humbled; but she was proud of him. Proud that in a cause of compassion and honour, he had been able to get the better of himself.”


165. “I am not afraid; for though I am the youngest, I'm the tallest.”


166. “Laugh as much as you choose, but you will not laugh me out of my opinion.”


167. We can all begin freely—a slight preference is natural enough, but there are very few of us who have heart enough to be really in love without encouragement.


168. You have bewitched me body and soul. And I love...I love...I love you. I never wish to be parted from you from this day on. -Mr. Darcy


169. “Have you any other objection than your belief of my indifference?”


170. “The distance is nothing, when one has a motive.”


171. “I have said no such thing. I am only resolved to act in that manner, which will, in my own opinion, constitute my happiness, without reference to you, or to any person so wholly unconnected with me. ” – Chapter 56


172. “‘If you will thank me,’ he replied, ‘let it be for yourself alone. That the wish of giving happiness to you might add force to the other inducements which led me on, I shall not attempt to deny. But your family owe me nothing. Much as I respect them, I believe I thought only of you.'”


173. “JANE: "Will you tell me how long you have loved him?"


174. “You are too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes are unchanged, but one word from you will silence me on this subject forever.”


175. “No poseo el talento de otros que pueden conversar con facilidad con quienes nunca han visto. No tengo valor para ello ni puedo adaptarme al carácter de los demás con la facilidad que otros lo hacen.”


176. “…dearest, loveliest Elizabeth [...] By you, I was properly humbled.”


177. “Sólo estoy dispuesta a proceder de la manera que considere más apropiada para mi felicidad, sin tener en cuenta lo que piense usted ni ningún otro.”


178. “You are mistaken, Mr. Darcy, if you suppose that the mode of your declaration affected me in any other way, than as it spared the concern which I might have felt in refusing you, had you behaved in a more gentlemanlike manner." (Elizabeth Bennett)”


179. “It is amazing to me,” said Bingley, “How young ladies can have patience to be so very accomplished as they all are.”


180. “-La imaginación de las mujeres hace que concibamos demasiadas ilusiones respecto de los hombres.


181. ... it is better to know as little as possible of the defects of the person with whom you are about to pass your life.' Charlotte Lucas to Lizzie


182. “La arrogancia y el orgullo son cosas muy distintas, aunque a menudo se tomen como sinónimos. Una persona puede ser orgullosa sin ser arrogante. El orgullo se refiere màs a nuestra opinión sobre nosotros mismos; la arrogancia, a lo que deseamos que los demás piensen de nosotros.”


183. “I dare say you will find him very agreeable. ” “Heaven forbid! That would be the greatest misfortune of all! To find a man agreeable whom one is determined to hate! Do not wish me such an evil. ” – Chapter 18


184. “I do not have the talent of conversing easily with people I have never met before.”


185. “Una persona che sa scrivere una lunga lettera con facilità non può scrivere male.”


186. “I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of anything than of a book!” Caroline Bingley


187. “Shall we ask him why a man of sense and education, and who has lived in the world, is ill qualified to recommend himself to strangers?” – Chapter 31


188. “We are each of an unsocial, taciturn disposition, unwilling to speak, unless we expect to say something that will amaze the whole room, and be handed down to posterity with all the éclat of a proverb. ” – Chapter 18


189. “If your daughter should have a dangerous fit of illness—if she should die, it would be a comfort to know that it was all in pursuit of Mr. Bingley, and under your orders. ” – Chapter 7


190. “She hardly knew how to suppose that she could be an object of admiration to so great a man. ”


191. “My dear Mr. Bennet," replied his wife, "how can you be so tiresome! You must know that I am thinking of his marrying one of them.”


192. “Adieu to disappointment and spleen. What are men to rocks and mountains?”


193. “Is not general incivility the very essence of love?” – Chapter 25


194. “... Y con facilidad perdonaría su orgullo si no hubiera mortificado el mío".”


195. “She is tolerable; but not handsome enough to tempt me; and I am in no humour at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men. You had better return to your partner and enjoy her smiles, for you are wasting your time with me.”


196. “Miss Bennet was therefore established as a sweet girl, and their brother felt authorized by such a commendation to think of her as he chose.”


197. “She is a selfish, hypocritical woman, and I have no opinion of her.”


198. But there are very few of us who have heart enough to be really in love without encouragement. -Jane Austen


199. “Elizabeth found that nothing was beneath this great lady's attention, which could furnish her with an occasion of dictating to others.”


200. “There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises with every attempt to intimidate me.”


201. “He is just what a young man ought to be,” said she, “sensible, good-humoured, lively; and I never saw such happy manners!—so much ease, with such perfect good breeding!” “He is also handsome,” replied Elizabeth, “which a young man ought likewise to be, if he possibly can. His character is thereby complete. ” – Chapter 4


202. For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbors, and laugh at them in our turn?-Jane Austen


203. “I'm ill qualified to recommend myself to strangers." Mr. Darcy”


204. “He (Mr. Collins) must be an oddity, I think,” said she, “I cannot make him out. There is something very pompous in his style. — And what can he mean by apologizing for being next in the entail? — We cannot suppose he would help it if he could. — Can he be a sensible man, sir?” Elizabeth Bennet


205. “I encourage him to be in his garden as often as possible. Then he has to walk to Rosings nearly every day. ... I admit I encourage him in that also.”


206. “All this she must possess," added Darcy, "and to all this she must yet add something more substantial, in the improvement of her mind by extensive reading.”


207. “Oh, Lizzy! do anything rather than marry without affection.”


208. “When a woman has five grown-up daughters, she ought to give over thinking of her own beauty.”


209. Your mother will never see you again if you do not marry Mr. Collins and I will never see you again if you do.-Mr. Bennet


210. “There seemed a gulf impassable between them.”


211. “From all that I can collect by your manner of talking, you must be two of the silliest girls in the country. I have suspected it some time, but I am now convinced.”


212. “Il y a, je crois, en chacun de nous, un défaut naturel que la meilleure éducation ne peut arriver à faire disparaître.”


213. “If any young men come for Mary or Kitty, send them in, for I am quite as leisure.”


214. “We shall be on good terms again; though we can never be what we once were to each other.”


215. Pemberley Woods with some perturbation.' -Jane Austen.


216. “There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense. ” – Chapter 24


217. Elizabeth longed to observe that Mr. Bingley had been a most delightful friend; so easily guided that his worth was invaluable; but she checked herself. She remembered that [Darcy] had yet to learn to be laughed at, and it was rather too early to begin. – Chapter 58


218. “Could there be finer symptoms? Is not general incivility the very essence of love?”


219. “And then when you go away, you may leave one or two of my sisters behind you; and I dare say I shall get husbands for them before the winter is over.''


220. ”We do not suffer by accident. ”


221. “No- I cannot talk of books in a ballroom; my head is always full of something else.”


222. “How hard it is in some cases to be believed!'


223. “And to all this she must yet add something more substantial, in the improvement of her mind by extensive reading.”


224. “I do not wish to avoid the walk. The distance is nothing when one has a motive.”


225. “I have no pretensions whatever to that kind of elegance which consists in tormenting a respectable man.”


226. “I must have my share in the conversation…”


227. There certainly was some great mismanagement in the education of those two young men. One has got all the goodness, and the other all the appearance of it.


228. “The power of doing anything with quickness is always prized much by the possessor, and often without any attention to the imperfection of the performance. ” – Chapter 10


229. “Come Darcy,' said he. 'I must have you dance. I hate to see you standing around by yourself in this stupid manner.”


230. “You showed me how insufficient were all my pretensions to please a woman worthy of being pleased. ” - Darcy


231. “Faktanya adalah, kau sudah lelah menerima kesopanan, kehormatan, dan perhatian yang berlebihan. Kau sudah muak dengan para wanita yang berbicara, memandang, dan berusaha keras untuk mencari persetujuan darimu. Lalu aku datang, dan kau langsung tertarik karena aku sangat berbeda dari mereka.”


232. “But do not be cast down. Such squeamish youths as cannot bear to be connected with a little absurdity are not worth a regret”


233. “Creo que en todo individuo hay cierta tendencia a un determinado mal, a un defecto innato, que ni siquiera la mejor educación puede vencer”


234. “Miss Eliza Bennet," said Miss Bingley, "despises cards. She is a great reader, and has no pleasure in anything else.”


235. “You are too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes are unchanged, but one word from you will silence me on this subject for ever. ” – Chapter 58


236. “I am only resolved to act in that manner, which will, in my own opinion, constitute my happiness, without reference to you, or to any person so wholly unconnected with me. ” - Elizabeth Bennet


237. “Pero mi locura no ha sido el amor sino la vanidad".”


238. “—¿Prefieres leer a jugar?


239. “I deserve neither such praise nor such censure,” cried Elizabeth; “I am not a great reader, and I have pleasure in many things.”


240. “Without thinking highly either of men or of matrimony, marriage had always been her object; it was the only honourable provision for well-educated young women of small fortune, and however uncertain of giving happiness, must be their pleasantest preservative from want.”


241. You expect me to account for opinions which you choose to call mine, but which I have never acknowledged.


242. “I should indefinitely prefer a book.”


243. “There is, I believe, in every disposition a tendency to some particular evil — a natural defect, which not even the best education can overcome.” Mr. Darcy


244. “But that expression of ‘violently in love’ is so hackneyed, so doubtful, so indefinite, that it gives me very little idea. It is as often applied to feelings which arise from a half-hour’s acquaintance, as to a real, strong attachment. Pray, how violent was Mr. Bingley’s love?” – Chapter 25


245. “I am certainly the most fortunate creature that ever existed!”


246. “Elizabeth could never address her without feeling that all the comfort of intimacy was over, and, though determined not to slacken as a correspondent, it was for the sake of what had been, rather than what was.”


247. “It was not in her nature, however, to increase her vexations by dwelling on them. She was confident of having performed her duty, and to fret over unavoidable evils, or augment them by anxiety, was not part of her disposition.”


248. “The distance is nothing when one has motive.”


249. “How hard it is in some cases to be believed!” “And how impossible in others!” – Chapter 54


250. “She is tolerable; but not handsome enough to tempt me; I am in no humour at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men.”


251. “It was for the sake of what had been, rather than what was.”


252. “Nay," cried Bingley, "this is too much, to remember at night all the foolish things that were said in the morning.”


253. “To walk three miles, or four miles, or five miles, or whatever it is, above her ancles in dirt, and alone, quite alone! what could she mean by it? It seems to me to shew an abominable sort of conceited independence, a most country-town indifference to decorum.” Caroline Bingley


254. “I should infinitely prefer a book...”


255. “[She] is one of those young ladies who seek to recommend themselves to the other sex by undervaluing their own, and with many men, I dare say, it succeeds. But, in my opinion, it is a paltry device, a very mean art.”


256. “This was a lucky recollection -- it saved her from something like regret.”


257. “There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others.”


258. We all know him to be a proud, unpleasant sort of man; but this would be nothing if you really liked him.


259. “That is the most unforgiving speech,” said Elizabeth, “that I ever heard you utter. Good girl!” – Chapter 55


260. “You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.


261. “It is your turn to say something now, Mr. Darcy. I talked about the dance, and you ought to make some kind of remark on the size of the room, or the number of couples.”


262. “By you, I was properly humbled. I came to you without a doubt of my reception. You shewed me how insufficient were all my pretensions to please a woman worthy of being pleased.”


263. Only the deepest love will persuade me into matrimony, which is why I shall end up an old maid. -Elizabeth Bennet


264. “If he is satisfied with only regretting me, when he might have obtained my affections and hand, I shall soon cease to regret him at all.”


265. “I am heartily ashamed of myself, Lizzy. But don't despair, it'll pass; and no doubt more quickly than it should.”


266. “Mr. Darcy is not to be laughed at!” cried Elizabeth. “That is an uncommon advantage, and uncommon I hope it will continue, for it would be a great loss to me to have many such acquaintance. I dearly love a laugh.” Elizabeth Bennet


267. “Nothing is more deceitful," said Darcy, "than the appearance of humility. It is often only carelessness of opinion, and sometimes an indirect boast.”


268. And yet I meant to be uncommonly clever in taking so decided a dislike to him, without any reason.


269. “I remember hearing you once say, Mr. Darcy, that you hardly ever forgave, that your resentment once created was unappeasable. You are very cautious, I suppose, as to its being created.”


270. I have not the pleasure of understanding you.-Jane Austen


271. “With the Gardiners, they were always on the most intimate terms. Darcy, as well as Elizabeth, really loved them; and they were both ever sensible of the warmest gratitude towards the persons who, by bringing her into Derbyshire, had been the means of uniting them.”


272. “I have been a selfish being all my life, in practice, though not in principle. As a child I was taught what was right, but I was not taught to correct my temper. I was given good principles, but left to follow them in pride and conceit. ” – Chapter 58


273. “Did not you? I did for you. But that is one great difference between us. Compliments always take you by surprise, and me never. ”


274. “Then, my dear, you may have the advantage of your friend, and introduce Mr. Bingley to her.”


275. Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance. If the dispositions of the parties are ever so well known to each other, or ever so similar beforehand, it does not advance their felicity in the least.


276. “To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love.”


277. “Keep your breath to cool your porridge’; and I shall keep mine to swell my song.”


278. “En compañía de un libro uno se aburre mucho menos.”


279. “There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me.”


280. “Well, my dear,” said Mr. Bennet, when Elizabeth had read the note aloud, “if your daughter should have a dangerous fit of illness—if she should die, it would be a comfort to know that it was all in pursuit of Mr. Bingley, and under your orders.”


281. “Sono poche le persone che io amo per davvero e ancora meno quelle delle quali io penso bene. Più conosco il mondo, più ne sono disgustata; e ogni giorno conferma la mia convinzione dell'incoerenza del carattere umano, e della poca fiducia che possiamo riporre in tutto ciò che può apparire merito o intelligenza.”


282. “But I hope you will get over it, and live to see many young men of four thousand a year come into the neighbourhood. ” “It will be no use to us, if twenty such should come, since you will not visit them. ” “Depend upon it, my dear, that when there are twenty, I will visit them all. ” – Chapter 1


283. “And with regard to the resentment of his family, or the indignation of the world, if the former were excited by his marrying me, it would not give me one moment's concern-- and the world in general would have too much sense to join in the scorn.”


284. “Will you tell me how long you have loved him?"


285. ... handsome young men must have something to live on as well as the plain.' Lizzie


286. “It is very often nothing but our own vanity that deceives us. Women fancy admiration means more than it does.


287. “The boy protested that she should not; she continued to declare that she would, and the argument ended only with the visit.”


288. “You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you. ”


289. “Nothing is more deceitful,” said Darcy, “than the appearance of humility. It is often only carelessness of opinion, and sometimes an indirect boast. ” – Chapter 10


290. “That is very true," replied Elizabeth, "and I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine.”


291. “She longed to know what at the moment was passing in his mind--in what manner he thought of her, and whether, in defiance of everything, she was still dear to him.”


292. I am not romantic, you know; I never was. I ask only a comfortable home; and considering Mr. Collins’s character, connection, and situation in life, I am convinced that my chance of happiness with him is as fair as most people can boast on entering the marriage state.


293. “Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can. ” - Elizabeth Bennet


294. “Though I know it must be a scandalous falsehood, though I would not injure him so much as to suppose the truth of it possible, I instantly resolved on setting off for this place, that I might make my sentiments known to you.”


295. “I (Elizabeth Bennet) wonder who first discovered the efficacy of poetry in driving away love!”


296. “keep your breath to cool your porridge”


297. “You may ask questions which I shall not choose to answer.”


298. I am excessively diverted.


299. “Si sus sentimientos son aún los mismos que en el pasado abril, dígamelo de una vez. Mi cariño y mis deseos no han cambiado, pero con una sola palabra suya no volveré a insistir más.”


300. “The power of doing anything with quickness is always much prized by the possessor, and often without any attention to the imperfection of the performance.” Mr. Darcy


301. The wisest and the best of men, nay, the wisest and best of their actions, maybe rendered ridiculous by a person whose first object in life is a joke.


302. “You were disgusted with the women who were always speaking and looking, and thinking for your approbation alone. I roused, and interested you, because I was so unlike them. ” - Elizabeth Bennet


303. You were disgusted with the women who were always speaking, and looking, and thinking for your approbation alone. I roused, and interested you, because I was so unlike them.


304. “…she felt depressed beyond any thing she had ever known before.”


305. “Bien heureusement, pensait Elizabeth, personne ne devait s’en apercevoir. Car, à beaucoup de sensibilité Jane unissait une égalité d’humeur et une maîtrise d’elle-même qui la préservait des curiosités indiscrètes.”


306. “Then,” observed Elizabeth, “you must comprehend a great deal in your idea of an accomplished woman.”


307. “You must learn some of my philosophy. Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure.”


308. “The far and the near must be relative, and depend on many varying circumstances.”


309. “La vanidad y el orgullo son cosas distintas, aunque muchas veces se usen como sinónimos. El orgullo está relacionado con la opinión que tenemos de nosotros mismos; la vanidad, con lo que quisiéramos que los demás pensaran de nosotros. –Si”


310. “How earnestly did she then wish that her former opinions had been more reasonable, more moderate!”


311. “My dear Mr. Bennet," said his lady to him one day, "have you heard that Netherfield Park is let at last?”


312. “I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of anything than of a book! -- When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.”


313. “I am the happiest creature in the world. Perhaps other people have said so before, but not one with such justice. ” - Elizabeth Bennet


314. “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”


315. “I've been used to consider poetry as the food of love " Mr.Darcy


316. “Je lui aurais volontiers pardonné son orgueil s'il n'avait tant mortifié le mien.”


317. “I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun.”


318. “As soon as they were gone, Elizabeth walked out to recover her spirits; or in other words, to dwell without interruption on those subjects that must deaden them more.”


319. “I am sorry you think so; but if that be the case, there can at least be


320. “It is happy for you that you possess the talent of flattering with delicacy. May I ask whether these pleasing attentions proceed from the impulse of the moment, or are the result of previous study?”


321. “…she endeavoured to forget what she could not overlook…”


322. “The commonest, dullest, most threadbare topic might be rendered interesting by the skill of the speaker.”


323. “The distance is nothing when one has a motive.”


324. “Heaven and earth!—of what are you thinking? Are the shades of Pemberley to be thus polluted?”


325. “Pride” and “prejudice” are more than just words to create a catchy title—they help illustrate the class and economic differences between the characters and how those are eventually overcome at the novel’s resolution. Take a look at these quotes if you need some moral inspiration.


326. “It was absolutely necessary to interrupt him now. ”


327. “Where there is a real superiority of mind, pride will be always under good regulation.”


328. “An unhappy alternative is before you, Elizabeth. From this day you must be a stranger to one of your parents.”


329. “and never had she so honestly felt that she could have loved him, as now, when all love must be vain.”


330. “I am only resolved to act in that manner, which will, in my own opinion, constitute my happiness, without reference to you, or to any person so wholly unconnected with me.”


331. “Vanity is a weakness indeed. But pride—where there is a real superiority of mind, pride will be always under good regulation. ” – Chapter 11


332. “It's been many years since I had such an exemplary vegetable.”


333. I often think,' she said, 'that there is nothing so bad as parting with one's friends. One seems to be forlorn without them.


334. “Really, Mr. Collins,’ cried Elizabeth with some warmth, ‘you puzzle me exceedingly. If what I have hitherto said can appear to you in the form of encouragement, I know not how to express my refusal in such a way as to convince you of its being one.”


335. “Have a little compassion on my nerves. You tear them to pieces.”


336. “Everything nourishes what is strong already.”


337. “You are a very strange creature by way of a friend!” Elizabeth Bennet to Charlotte Lucas


338. “And this," cried Darcy, as he walked with quick steps across the room, "is your opinion of me! This is the estimation in which you hold me! I thank you for explaining it so fully.”


339. “Resignation to inevitable evils is the evil duty of us all; the”


340. Had I been in love, I could not have been more wretchedly blind. But vanity, not love, has been my folly. - Jane Austen


341. “A girl likes to be crossed a little in love now and then.


342. “‘I have been used to consider poetry as the food of love,’ said Darcy. ‘Of a fine, stout, healthy love it may. Everything nourishes what is strong already. But if it be only a slight, thin sort of inclination, I am convinced that one good sonnet will starve it entirely away.'”


343. “For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn?” – Chapter 57


344. “It is a rule with me that a person who can write a long letter with ease cannot write ill.” Caroline Bingley


345. “Gratitude, not merely for having once loved her, but for loving her still well enough, to forgive all the petulance and acrimony of her manner in rejecting him, and all the unjust accusations accompanying her rejection.”


346. “Mr. Darcy said very little, and Mr. Hurst nothing at all. The former was divided between admiration of the brilliancy which exercise had given to her complexion, and doubt as to the occasion's justifying her coming so far alone. The latter was thinking only of his breakfast.”


347. “Hay tanto de gratitud o de vanidad en casi todos los defectos, que no es cauto abandonarse de ellos.”


348. “Compliments always take you by surprise, and me never.”


349. Could you expect me to rejoice in the inferiority of your connections?—to congratulate myself on the hope of relations, whose condition in life is so decidedly beneath my own?


350. The happiness which this reply produced, was such as he had probably never felt before; and he expressed himself on the occasion as sensibly and as warmly as a man violently in love can be supposed to do. – Chapter 58


351. She began now to comprehend that he was exactly the man, who, in disposition and talents, would most suit her.


352. “Alçakgönüllü görünmek kadar aldatıcı hiçbir şey olamaz. Aslında bu ya dikkatsizlik ve umursamazlıktır ya da kimi kez gizli övünmedir.”


353. Do not consider me now as an elegant female, intending to plague you, but as a rational creature, speaking the truth from her heart.


354. They were all of them warm in their admiration; and at that moment she felt that to be mistress of Pemberley might be something!


355. “Your conjecture is totally wrong, I assure you. My mind was more agreeably engaged. I have been meditating on the very great pleasure which a pair of fine eyes in the face of a pretty woman can bestow.”


356. “It is very often nothing but our own vanity that deceives us.”


357. “We do not suffer by accident.”


358. “These bitter accusations might have been suppressed, had I, with greater policy, concealed my struggles, and flattered you into the belief of my being impelled by unqualified, unalloyed inclination; by reason, by reflection, by everything. But disguise of every sort is my abhorrence.”


359. “When Mr. Collins could be forgotten, there was really an air of great comfort throughout, and by Charlotte’s evident enjoyment of it, Elizabeth supposed he must be often forgotten.”


360. “Piensa solo en el pasado cuando su recuerdo sea placentero.”


361. “There certainly was some great mismanagement in the education of those two young men. One has got all the goodness, and the other all the appearance of it.”


362. I have faults enough, but they are not, I hope, of understanding. My temper I dare not vouch for. It is, I believe, too little yielding— certainly too little for the convenience of the world.-Jane Austen


363. “I had not at that time the honour of knowing any lady in the assembly beyond my own party. ” “True; and nobody can ever be introduced in a ball-room. ” – Chapter 31


364. “Yes, vanity is a weakness indeed. But pride—where there is a real superiority of mind, pride will be always under good regulation. ” - Darcy


365. “Do not be in a hurry, the right man will come at last. ”


366. “It was gratitude; gratitude, not merely


367. “Pride has often been his best friend. It has connected him nearer with virtue than any other feeling.”


368. [Lydia] has no money, no connections, nothing that can tempt him to — she is lost forever.


369. “Till I have your disposition, your goodness, I never can have your happiness. ” – Chapter 55


370. “loss of virtue in a female is irretrievable; that one false step involves her in endless ruin; that her reputation is no less brittle than it is beautiful; and that she cannot be too much guarded in her behaviour towards the undeserving of the other sex.”


371. “Till this moment I never knew myself. ”


372. “There is so much of gratitude or vanity in almost every attachment, that it is not safe to leave any to itself. We can all begin freely—a slight preference is natural enough; but there are very few of us who have heart enough to be really in love without encouragement.”


373. “You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.”


374. “I am the happiest creature in the world. Perhaps other people have said so before, but not one with such justice. I am happier even than Jane; she only smiles, I laugh. Mr. Darcy sends you all the love in the world that he can spare from me. ” – Chapter 60


375. “It makes me very nervous and poorly,to be thwarted so in my own family, and to have neighbours who think of themselves before anybody else. However, your coming just at this time is the greatest of comforts, and I am very glad to hear what you tell us, of long sleeves.”


376. “Her daughters were eagerly called to partake of her joy. Jane resolutely kept her place at the table; but Elizabeth, to satisfy her mother, went to the window—she looked,—she saw Mr. Darcy with him, and sat down again by her sister.”


377. “What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing, after all. I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished societies.”


378. “In vain have I struggled? It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.”


379. As I must therefore conclude that you are not serious in your rejection of me, I shall choose to attribute it to your wish of increasing my love by suspense, according to the usual practice of elegant females.


380. “In vain I have struggled, it will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you."


381. “I think you are in very great danger of making him as much in love with you as ever. ” - Elizabeth Bennet


382. “She is tolerable, but not handsome enough to tempt me, and I am in no humor at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men.”


383. “She had a lively, playful disposition that delighted in anything ridiculous. ”


384. “He has always something to say to everybody. That is my idea of good breeding; and those persons who fancy themselves very important, and never open their mouths, quite mistake the matter. ” – Chapter 9


385. “Mi afecto y mis anhelos no han variado; pero una palabra suya me hará callar para siempre"


386. “I am afraid I interrupt your solitary ramble, my dear sister,' said he, as he joined her.


387. “What do I not owe you! You taught me a lesson, hard indeed at first, but most advantageous. By you, I was properly humbled. I came to you without a doubt of my reception. You showed me how insufficient were all my pretensions to please a woman worthy of being pleased. — Darcy”


388. “Angry people are not always wise. ”


389. “My good opinion once lost, is lost forever.”


390. “He was the proudest, most disagreeable man in the world, and everybody hoped that he would never come there again. ”


391. “Arguments are too much like disputes.”


392. “–Sé de sobra –replicó Collins con un grave gesto de su mano– que entre las jóvenes es muy corriente rechazar las proposiciones del hombre a quien, en el fondo, piensan aceptar,”


393. “Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance. If the dispositions of the parties are ever so well known to each other or ever so similar beforehand, it does not advance their felicity in the least.”


394. “Neither duty, nor honour, nor gratitude,” replied Elizabeth, “have any possible claim on me, in the present instance. No principle of either would be violated by my marriage with Mr. Darcy”


395. “I dearly love a laugh.”


396. “I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine.”


397. “In essentials I believe Mr. Darcy is very much what he ever was. When I said that he improved on acquaintance, I did not mean that either his mind or manners were in a state of improvement. But that from knowing him better his disposition was better understood.”


398. “Engaged to Mr. Collins! My dear Charlotte—impossible!”


399. She attracted him more than he liked.


400. You must learn some of my philosophy. Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure.


401. “I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of anything than of a book! When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.”


402. “I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! -- When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.”


403. “There was certainly at this moment, in Elizabeth's mind, a more gentle sensation towards the original, that she had ever felt in the height of their acquaintance.


404. “We all know him to be a proud, unpleasant sort of man; but this would be nothing if you really liked him. ” – Chapter 59


405. “If you will thank me," he replied, "let it be for yourself alone. That the wish of giving happiness to you might add force to the other inducements which led me on, I shall not attempt to deny. But your family owe me nothing. Much as I respect them, I believe I thought only of you."


406. “For my part, I am determined never to speak of it again to anybody. I told my sister Phillips so the other day.”


407. “The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.”


408. “Nothing is more deceitful…than the appearance of humility. It is often only carelessness of opinion, and sometimes an indirect boast.”


409. “In vain I have struggled. It will not do. My feelings will no longer be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you. ” - Darcy


410. “Do anything rather than marry without affection.”


411. “A man in distressed circumstances has not time for all those elegant decorums which other people may observe. If she does not object


412. “often nothing but our own vanity that deceives us.”


413. “In vain I have struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you. ” – Chapter 34


414. “And never allow yourself to be blinded by prejudice?”


415. “Do not you feel a great inclination, Miss Bennet, to seize such an opportunity of dancing a reel?”


416. “She hardly knew how to suppose that she could be an object of admiration to so great a man.”


417. “Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what would have others think of us.”


418. “I have no more to say. If this be the case, he deserves you. I could not have parted with you, my Lizzy, to any one less worthy.”


419. “You could not have made me the offer of your hand in an possible way that would have tempted me to accept it.”


420. “And you are never to stir out of doors till you can prove that you have spent ten minutes of every day in a rational manner.”


421. “There is, I believe, in every disposition a tendency to some particular evil—a natural defect, which not even the best education can overcome. ” - Darcy


422. “They walked on, without knowing in what direction. There was too much to be thought, and felt, and said, for attention to any other objects.”


423. “No has de cambiar, por consideración a una persona, el significado de los principios y de la integridad, ni tratar de convencerte, o convencerme a mí, de que el egoísmo es prudencia y la insensibilidad ante el peligro certidumbre de felicidad.”


424. His character was decided. He was the proudest, most disagreeable man in the world, and everybody hoped that he would never come there again.


425. “Mr. Wickham was the happy man towards whom almost every female eye was turned, and Elizabeth was the happy woman by whom he finally seated himself”


426. “A lady’s imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment.”


427. “Cuanto más conozco el mundo, más me irrita, y todos los días confirmo mi creencia en la inconstancia del carácter humano y en la poca que me inspiran las apariencias de mérito o talento.”


428. “I have been meditating on the very great pleasure which a pair of fine eyes in the face of a pretty woman can bestow.”


429. “[...] No consigo olvidar las locuras y los vicios de otros tan pronto como debiera, ni las ofensas que se me hacen. Mis sentimientos no se modifican cad vez que se intenta influir sobre ellos. Quizá pueda decirse que tiendo al resentimiento. Cuando pierdo mi buena opinión sobre alguien o algo, perdido está para siempre”


430. “My good opinion, once lost, is lost for ever. ”


431. A lady’s imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment.


432. “Good opinion once lost, is lost forever”


433. “My ideas flow so rapidly that I have not time to expressed them.”


434. “You are too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes are unchanged; but one word from you will silence me on this subject for ever.”


435. To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love. – Chapter 3


436. “I sincerely hope your Christmas...may abound in the gaieties which the season generally brings…”


437. “[She wanted] to make herself agreeable to all; and in the latter object, where she feared most to fail, she was most sure of success, for those to whom she endeavoured to give pleasure were prepossessed in her favour. Bingley was ready, Georgiana was eager, and Darcy determined, to be pleased. ” – Chapter 44


438. “Nothing is more deceitful,” said Darcy, “than the appearance of humility. It is often only carelessness of opinion, and sometimes an indirect boast.”


439. “–He luchado en vano. Ya no puedo más. Soy incapaz de contener mis sentimientos. Permítame que le diga que la admiro y la amo apasionadamente.”


440. “—Bueno, querida —dijo el señor Bennet, cuando Elizabeth leyó la misiva en voz alta—, si tu hija enferma gravemente, si acaba muriendo, será un consuelo saber que todo fue para pescar al señor Bingley, y siguiendo tus órdenes”


441. “My style of writing is very different from yours.”


442. “Soy la criatura más dichosa del mundo. Tal vez otros lo hayan dicho antes, pero nadie con tanta justicia.”


443. “A person who can write a long letter with ease, cannot write ill.”


444. “It is amazing to me," said Bingley, "How young ladies can have patience to be so very accomplished as they all are."


445. What are young men to rocks and mountains?


446. “Do you talk by rule, then, while you are dancing?"


447. Your defect is a propensity to hate everybody. "And yours," he replied with a smile, "is willfully to misunderstand them. -Jane Austen.


448. “You must give me leave to judge for myself, and pay me the compliment of believing what I say. ” – Chapter 19


449. “Books--oh! no. I am sure we never read the same, or not with the same


450. “You might have talked to me more when you came to dinner. ” “A man who had felt less, might. ” – Chapter 60


451. “There is something very pompous in his style. —And what can he mean by apologising for being next in the entail?—We cannot suppose he would help it if he could. —Could he be a sensible man, sir?” “No, my dear, I think not. I have great hopes of finding him quite the reverse. – Chapter 13


452. “There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me. ” – Chapter 31


453. I am happier than Jane; she only smiles, I laugh. Mr. Darcy sends you all the love in the world, that he can spare from me. - Jane Austen


454. “I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun.”


455. “In nine cases out of ten a woman had better show more affection than she feels.” Charlotte Lucas


456. I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of anything than of a book! -Jane Austen


457. My good opinion once lost is lost forever. -Mr. Darcy


458. “I am happier than Jane; she only smiles, I laugh. Mr. Darcy sends you all the love in the world, that he can spare from me.”


459. “Indeed, sir, I have not the least intention of dancing. I entreat you not to suppose that I moved this way in order to beg for a partner.”


460. “they are all silly and ignorant like other girls; but Lizzy has something more of quickness than her sisters.”


461. “You shall not, for the sake of one individual, change the meaning of principle and integrity,”


462. “El orgullo está relacionado con la opinión que tenemos de nosotros mismos; la vanidad, con lo que quisiéramos que los demás pensaran de nosotros.”


463. I must learn to be content with being happier than I deserve.


464. “You do not make allowance enough for difference of situation and temper.”


465. “When I am in the country,” he replied, “I never wish to leave it; and when I am in town, it is pretty much the same. They have each their advantages, and I can be equally happy in either.” Charles Bingley


466. “...had you behaved in a more gentleman like manner!”


467. “Oh! Lizzy, why am I thus singled from my family, and blessed above them all! If I could but see you as happy! If there were but such another man for you!”


468. “Your conjecture is totally wrong, I assure you. My mind was more agreeably engaged. I have been meditating on the very great pleasure which a pair of fine eyes in the face of a pretty women can bestow." Mr. Darcy”


469. If I had ever learnt, I should have been a great proficient. - Jane Austen


470. “Kitty has no discretion in her coughs,” said her father; “she times them ill.”


471. Angry people are not always wise. – Chapter 45


472. “Hayırseverliğine hayramım," diye konuştu Mary, " Ama yine de bütün duygusal dürtüler mantıkla yönlendirilmelidir. Şahsen fikrimi sorarsan; insanın harcadığı her emek daima kendisinden talep edilenle doğru orantılı olmalıdır.”


473. “I do not play this instrument so well as I should wish to, but I have always supposed that to be my own fault because I would not take the trouble of practicing.”


474. “Mr. Darcy has no defect. He owns it himself without disguise.” Elizabeth Bennet


475. “When Mr. Collins could be forgotten, there was really an air of great comfort throughout, and by Charlotte’s evident enjoyment of it, Elizabeth supposed he must be often forgotten. ” – Chapter 28


476. “His character was decided. He was the proudest, most disagreeable man in the world, and everybody hoped that he would never come there again.”


477. “The loss of virtue in a female is irretrievable - that one false step involves in her endless ruin - that her reputation is no less brittle than it is beautiful - and that she cannot be too much guarded in her behavior towards the undeserving of the opposite sex.”


478. “To be sure, you knew no actual good of me—but nobody thinks of that when they fall in love.”


479. “You have a very small park here,” returned Lady Catherine after a short silence…”This must be a most inconvenient sitting room for the evening


480. “Do not consider me now as an elegant female, intending to plague you, but as a rational creature, speaking the truth from her heart. ” – Chapter 19


481. “Indeed I do not dare.”


482. Mr. Wickham’s chief object was unquestionably my sister’s fortune, which is thirty thousand pounds.


483. “Obstinate, headstrong girl!” – Chapter 56


484. “If you are not so compassionate as to dine to-day with Louisa and me, we shall be in danger of hating each other for the rest of our lives, for a whole day's tête-à-tête between two women can never end without a quarrel.”


485. “Nothing remains for me but to assure you in the most animated language of the violence of my affection.”


486. “‘All this she must possess,’ added Darcy, ‘and to all this she must yet add something more substantial, in the improvement of her mind by extensive reading.'”


487. “Un plan que promete incontables placeres no puede triunfar; y el desencanto general sólo se conjura con ayuda de algún pequeño disgusto.”


488. “Dear Sir, I must trouble you once more for congratulations. Elizabeth will soon be the wife of Mr. Darcy. Console Lady Catherine as well as you can. But, if I were you, I would stand by the nephew. He has more to give. Yours sincerely, etc. ” – Chapter 60


489. “What is his name?”


490. “I admire the activity of your benevolence,” observed Mary, “but every impulse of feeling should be guided by reason; and, in my opinion, exertion should always be in proportion to what is required.” Mary Bennet


491. “el esfuerzo debe ser proporcional a lo que se pretende.”


492. “I hope you saw her petticoat, six inches deep in mud, I am absolutely certain.”


493. “We must stem the tide of malice, and pour into the wounded bosoms of each other the balm of sisterly consolation. ” – Chapter 47


494. “Eliza Bennet,” said Miss Bingley, when the door was closed on her, “is one of those young ladies who seek to recommend themselves to the other sex by undervaluing their own; and with many men, I dare say, it succeeds. But, in my opinion, it is a paltry device, a very mean art.” Caroline Bingley


495. “There is, I believe, in every disposition a tendency to some particular evil, a natural defect, which not even the best education can overcome."


496. “Such squeamish youths as cannot bear to be connected with a little absurdity are not worth a regret.”


497. “And we mean to treat you all,' added Lydia, 'but you must lend us the money, for we have just spent ours at the shop out there.”


498. “Aunque me dieras cuarenta hombres como él, nunca sería tan feliz como tú. Mientras no posea tu buen carácter, tu bondad, no podrá embargarme esa dicha. No, no, déjame a mi aire; y, tal vez, si me acompaña la suerte, con el tiempo pueda encontrar a otro señor Collins.”


499. “But in such cases as these a good memory is unpardonable.”


500. “Cuando alguien ha perdido mi buena opinión, perdida la tiene para siempre.”


501. “I have not the pleasure of understanding you.”


502. “Her heart did whisper that he had done it for her.”


503. “Elizabeth had never been more at a loss to make her feelings appear what they were not. It was necessary to laugh, when she would rather have cried. ”


504. “Are you consulting your own feelings in the present case, or do you imagine that you are gratifying mine?”


505. Everything nourishes what is strong already. - Jane Austen


506. “You shall not, for the sake of one individual, change the meaning of principle and integrity, nor endeavour to persuade yourself or me, that selfishness is prudence, and insensibility of danger security for happiness.”


507. “I never could be so happy as you. Till I have your disposition, your goodness, I never can have your happiness.”


508. “Yes, all of them, I think. They all paint tables, cover screens and net purses. I scarcely know any one who cannot do all this, and I am sure I never heard a young lady spoken of for the first time without being informed that she was very accomplished.”


509. “Do not consider me now as an elegant female, intending to play you, but as a rational creature, speaking the truth from her heart.”


510. “And so ended his affection,” said Elizabeth impatiently. “There has been many a one, I fancy, overcome in the same way. I wonder who first discovered the efficacy of poetry in driving away love!”


511. “What are men to rocks and mountains?”


512. “It is wonderful, for almost all his actions may be traced to pride;-and pride has often been his best friend.”


513. Follies and nonsense, whims, and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can.


514. “Amaba el campo y los libros, y de semejantes aficiones había extraído sus principales goces.”


515. “A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us. ” – Chapter 5


516. “Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance.”


517. “Mr. Collins is a conceited, pompous, narrow-minded, silly man; you know he is, as well as I do; and you must feel, as well as I do, that the woman who married him cannot have a proper way of thinking.”


518. Nothing is more deceitful…than the appearance of humility. It is often only carelessness of opinion, and sometimes an indirect boast. -Jane Austen


519. “I beg your pardon; one knows exactly what to think.”


520. Upon the whole, therefore, she found, what has been sometimes found before, that an event to which she had been looking with impatient desire did not, in taking place, bring all the satisfaction she had promised herself. – Chapter 42


521. “If, upon mature deliberation, you find that the misery of disobliging his two sisters is more than equivalent to the happiness of being his wife, I advise you by all means to refuse him. ” – Chapter 21


522. Oh, Lizzy! do anything rather than marry without affection.- Jane Austen


523. “I have been used to consider poetry as the food of love.”


524. “He may live in my memory as the most amiable man of my acquaintance..”


525. “People themselves alter so much, that there is something new to be observed in them for ever.”


526. “Next to being married, a girl likes to be crossed in love a little now and then. It is something to think of, and gives her a sort of distinction among her companions”


527. “It taught me to hope," said he, "as I had scarcely ever allowed myself to hope before.”


528. “He is a gentleman; I am a gentleman’s daughter; so far we are equal. ” – Chapter 56


529. “To walk three miles, or four miles, or five miles, or whatever it is, above her ankles in dirt, and alone, quite alone! What could she mean by it? It seems to me to show an abominable sort of conceited independence, a most country-town indifference to decorum.”


530. “I do not pretend to possess equal frankness with your ladyship. You may ask questions which I shall not choose to answer.”


531. “Es una verdad mundialmente reconocida que un hombre soltero, poseedor de una gran fortuna, necesita una esposa.”


532. “I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look, or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun.”


533. “There is nothing so bad as parting with one’s friends.”


534. “Affectation of candour is common enough—one meets with it everywhere. But to be candid without ostentation or design—to take the good of everybody’s character and make it still better, and say nothing of the bad—belongs to you alone.”


535. What are men to rocks and mountains?- Jane Austen


536. Her hopes were answered; Jane had not been gone long before it rained hard. Her sisters were uneasy for her, but her mother was delighted.


537. To Elizabeth it appeared that, had her family made an agreement to expose themselves as much as they could during the evening, it would have been impossible for them to play their parts with more spirit or finer success. – Chapter 18


538. “There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me." "I”


539. “There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me. ”


540. Have you any other objection than your belief of my indifference?- Jane Austen


541. “I have not been in the habit of brooking disappointment. ” “That will make your ladyship’s situation at present more pitiable; but it will have no effect on me. ” – Chapter 56


542. “He (Mr. Darcy) has a very satirical eye, and if I do not begin by being impertinent myself, I shall soon grow afraid of him.” Elizabeth Bennet


543. “There are few people whom I really love,