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150 Inspirational Quotes On Feedback (2023)

1. “Critics only make you stronger. You have to look at what they are saying as feedback. Sometimes the feedback helps, and other times, it’s just noise that can be a distraction.”


2. “If you are working on a product that’s going to be consumer-facing, then feedback is invaluable. You should be out there being brave and talking to people and asking for feedback as much as possible.” -Emily Brooke, Co-founder of Blaze


3. If you’re not in the arena also getting your butt kicked, I’m not interested in your feedback. – Brené Brown


4. “There is no failure, only feedback.”


5. “This is the feedback loop behind all human behavior: try, fail, learn, try differently”


6. “Chapter Summary The 2nd Law of Behavior Change is make it attractive. The more attractive an opportunity is, the more likely it is to become habit-forming. Habits are a dopamine-driven feedback loop. When dopamine rises, so does our motivation to act. It is the anticipation of a reward—not the fulfillment of it—that gets us to take action. The greater the anticipation, the greater the dopamine spike. Temptation bundling is one way to make your habits more attractive. The strategy is to pair an action you want to do with an action you need to do.”


7. “If you’re not in the arena also getting your ass kicked. I’m not interested in your feedback.”


8. “When we’re defined by what people think, we lose the courage to be vulnerable. Therefore, we need to be selective about the feedback we let into our lives.”


9. “The downside of two-way communication is that feedback may suggest that we are on the wrong course and that the vision needs to be reformulated. But in the long run, swallowing our pride and reworking the vision is far more productive than heading off in the wrong direction – or in a direction that others won’t follow.”


10. “Even if your organization doesn’t currently embrace critical upward feedback, holding an open season on leaders might be an effective way to begin changing the culture.”


11. “The most important challenge of building a team where people hold one another accountable is overcoming the understandable hesitance of human beings to give one another critical feedback.”


12. “Don't solicit feedback on your product, idea or your business just for validation purposes. You want to tell the people who can help move your idea forward, but if you're just looking to your friend, co-worker, husband or wife for validation, be careful. It can stop a lot of multimillion-dollar ideas in their tracks in the beginning.”


13. “Negative feedback can make people feel inferior.”


14. “Habits are a dopamine-driven feedback loop.”


15. “Dr. Seuss Enterprises listened and took feedback from our audiences including teachers, academics and specialists in the field as part of our review process. We then worked with a panel of experts, including educators, to review our catalog of titles”


16. “I think it’s very important to have a feedback loop, where you’re constantly thinking about what you’ve done and how you could be doing it better”


17. “Executive coaches are not for the meek. They’re for people who value unambiguous feedback. All coaches have one thing in common, it’s that they are ruthlessly results-oriented.”


18. “The ways this separation manifests itself negatively are immense: We can’t work with other people if we’ve put up walls. We can’t improve the world if we don’t understand it or ourselves. We can’t take or receive feedback if we are incapable of or uninterested in hearing from outside sources. We can’t recognize opportunities—or create them—if instead of seeing what is in front of us, we live inside our own fantasy.”


19. “It is very important to have a feedback loop, where you are constantly thinking about what you’ve done and how you could be doing it better.” – Elon Musk


20. “When we stop caring about what people think, we lose our capacity for connection. When we become defined by what people think, we lose our willingness to be vulnerable. If we dismiss all the criticism, we lose out on important feedback, but if we subject ourselves to the hatefulness, our spirits gets crushed. It’s a tightrope, shame resilience is the balance bar, and the safety net below is the one or two people in our lives who can help us reality-check the criticism and cynicism.”


21. There is no failure. Only feedback. – Robert Allen


22. “I always bring my core values to feedback conversations. I specifically bring courage, which means that I don’t choose comfort over being respectful and honest—choosing politeness over respect is not respectful.”


23. “I know I’m ready to give feedback when: I’m ready to sit next to you rather than across from you; I’m willing to put the problem in front of us rather than between us (or sliding it toward you); I’m ready to listen, ask questions, and accept that I may not fully understand the issue; I want to acknowledge what you do well instead of picking apart your mistakes; I recognize your strengths and how you can use them to address your challenges; I can hold you accountable without shaming or blaming you; I’m willing to own my part; I can genuinely thank you for your efforts rather than criticize you for your failings; I can talk about how resolving these challenges will lead to your growth and opportunity; and I can model the vulnerability and openness that I expect to see from you.”


24. However, the benefits of habits come at a cost. At first, each repetition develops fluency, speed, and skill. But then, as a habit becomes automatic, you become less sensitive to feedback. You fall into mindless repetition. It becomes easier to let mistakes slide. When you can do it “good enough” on autopilot, you stop thinking about how to do it better.»


25. “Bad emotions, bad parents, and bad feedback have more impact than good ones, and bad information is processed more thoroughly than good. The”


26. “Intuitive diagnosis is reliable when people have a lot of relevant feedback. But people are very often willing to make intuitive diagnoses even when they're very likely to be wrong.”


27. “We have to be able to take feedback—regardless of how it’s delivered—and apply it productively. We have to do this for a simple reason: Mastery requires feedback. I don’t care what we’re trying to master—and whether we’re trying to develop greatness or proficiency—it always requires feedback.”


28. “I highly recommend an exercise I call One Thing. Each member of the team receives feedback from the others on his or her single greatest strength or most admirable ability and his or her biggest weakness or hindrance to the success of the company. The exercise is done out in the open, with the entire leadership team present. I believe the peer-evaluation methods that are conducted anonymously actually do more harm than good.”


29. “Refuse to attach a negative meaning to the word ‘no.’ View it as feedback. ‘No’ tells you to change your approach, create more value or try again later.” – Anthony Iannarino, best-selling author and keynote speaker


30. “A lot of cheap seats in the arena are filled with people who never venture onto the floor. They just hurl mean-spirited criticisms and put-downs from a safe distance. The problem is, when we stop caring what people think and stop feeling hurt by cruelty, we lose our ability to connect. But when we’re defined by what people think, we lose the courage to be vulnerable. Therefore, we need to be selective about the feedback we let into our lives. For me, if you’re not in the arena also getting your ass kicked, I’m not interested in your feedback.”


31. Let me start by thanking you for your feedback on our new sales strategy, Jenn. We’ve all benefited from your perspective and your clear commitment to the project success.


32. “Don’t solicit feedback on your product, idea or your business just for validation purposes. You want to tell the people who can help move your idea forward, but if you’re just looking to your friend, co-worker, husband or wife for validation, be careful. It can stop a lot of multimillion-dollar ideas in their tracks in the beginning.” – Sara Blakely


33. “When leaders become isolated, they stop getting critical feedback.”


34. “…control has to be by feedback from the work done. The work itself has to provide the information. If it has to be checked all the time, there is no control”


35. “You want to be extra rigorous about making the best possible thing you can. Find everything that’s wrong with it and fix it. Seek negative feedback, particularly from friends.” -- Elon Musk


36. Cultivate a network of trusted mentors and colleagues. Other people can give us the best insight into ourselves—and our own limitations. We must have the courage to ask for help and to request feedback to expand our vision of what's possible.”—Maria Castañón Moats


37. “No one can or should try to force another person to be more effective, more righteous, more knowledgeable, more productive, friendlier, braver, more trustworthy, or in any other way more politically or socially correct. Coach them, encourage them, teach them, give them feedback, admonish them, love them, and lead them, but don’t try to coerce them.”


38. “What behaviors are rewarded? Punished? Where and how are people actually spending their resources (time, money, attention)? What rules and expectations are followed, enforced, and ignored? Do people feel safe and supported talking about how they feel and asking for what they need? What are the sacred cows? Who is most likely to tip them? Who stands the cows back up? What stories are legend and what values do they convey? What happens when someone fails, disappoints, or makes a mistake? How is vulnerability (uncertainty, risk, and emotional exposure) perceived? How prevalent are shame and blame and how are they showing up? What’s the collective tolerance for discomfort? Is the discomfort of learning, trying new things, and giving and receiving feedback normalized, or is there a high premium put on comfort (and how does that look)?”


39. Good feedback is THE most powerful tool you can use to help teachers improve. And yet, you can never have the impact you want to have with teachers if you are accidentally killing their motivation and ability to act on your feedback.


40. Really pay attention to negative feedback and solicit it, particularly from friends. … Hardly anyone does that, and it’s incredibly helpful.


41. “Loving a baby is a circular business, a kind of feedback loop. The more you give, the more you get and the more you get, the more you feel like giving.”


42. How do you hold yourself accountable for your work? Do you ask for feedback from your manager and peers?


43. “The most constructive approach to critical feedback follows from the concept of leader as teacher. When you need to provide corrective or negative guidance, think not of yourself as a critic—or even a boss—but as a guide, mentor, and teacher. The process of critique should be an educational experience that contributes to the further development of the individual.”


44. “To learn anything other than the stuff you find in books, you need to be able to experiment, to make mistakes, to accept feedback, and to try again. It doesn’t matter whether you are learning to ride a bike or starting a new career, the cycle of experiment, feedback, and new experiment is always there.” ~ Charles Handy


45. “Everything starts with deceptive ideas, or lies we believe (put our trust in and live by) about reality—mental maps that come from the devil, not Jesus, and lead to death, not life. But deceptive ideas get as far as they do because they appeal to our disordered desires, or our flesh. And then the world comes in to complete the three enemies’ circular loop. Our disordered desires are normalized in a sinful society, which functions as a kind of echo chamber for the flesh. A self-validating feedback loop where we’re all telling each other what we want (or what our flesh wants) to hear.”


46. “One of the most powerful forms of information is feedback on our own actions.”


47. “Giver burnout has less to do with the amount of giving and more with the amount of feedback about the impact of that giving. Givers don’t burn out when they devote too much time and energy to giving. They burn out when they’re working with people in need but are unable to help effectively.”


48. “Make sure you have a mentor in your industry; someone who is objective and can offer honest feedback. Don’t rely on family and friends for this.” – Mark Gatto


49. “We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve.“ – Bill Gates.


50. “Ego is the enemy- giving us wicked feedback, disconnected from reality. It’s defensive, precisely when we cannot afford to be defensive. It blocks us from improving by telling us that we don’t need to improve. Then we wonder why we don’t get the results we want, why others are better and why their success is more lasting.”


51. “When General Eisenhower was elected president, his predecessor, Harry Truman, said: “Poor Ike; when he was a general, he gave an order and it was carried out. Now he is going to sit in that big office and he’ll give an order and not a damn thing is going to happen.” The reason why “not a damn thing is going to happen” is, however, not that generals have more authority than presidents. It is that military organizations learned long ago that futility is the lot of most orders and organized the feedback to check on the execution of the order. They learned long ago that to go oneself and look is the only reliable feedback.5 Reports—all an American president is normally able to mobilize—are not much help. All military services have long ago learned that the officer who has given an order goes out and sees for himself whether it has been carried out. At the least he sends one of his own aides—he never relies on what he is told by the subordinate to whom the order was given. Not that he distrusts the subordinate; he has learned from experience to distrust communications.”


52. “It takes humility to seek feedback. It takes wisdom to understand it, analyze it and appropriately act on it.” —Stephen Covey”


53. “Making art provides uncomfortably accurate feedback about the gap that inevitably exists between what you intended to do, and what you did.”


54. “There is no failure. Only feedback.” – Robert Allen


55. “Only when a team member proves uncoachable—is resistant to feedback and takes no responsibility for how they show up at work—should we seriously consider removing them from the team.”


56. “If you are not in the arena getting your ass kicked on occasion, I am not interested in or open to your feedback. There are a million cheap seats in the world today filled with people who will never be brave with their own lives, but will spend every ounce of energy they have hurling advice and judgement at those of us trying to dare greatly. Their only contributions are criticism, cynicism, and fear-mongering. If you're criticizing from a place where you're not also putting yourself on the line, I'm not interested in your feedback.”


57. “I think it’s very important to have a feedback loop, where you’re constantly thinking about what you’ve done and how you could be doing it better.” – Elon Musk


58. “Again, there’s no question that feedback may be one of the most difficult arenas to negotiate in our lives. We should remember, though, that victory is not getting good feedback, avoiding giving difficult feedback, or avoiding the need for feedback. Instead it’s taking off the armor, showing up, and engaging.”


59. “acquisition of skills requires a regular environment, an adequate opportunity to practice, and rapid and unequivocal feedback about the correctness of thoughts and actions.” ― Daniel Kahneman,


60. “Most people respond well to honest feedback, particularly when it comes from a coach and not an accuser, who offers it within the context of results, and accompanies it with an invitation to provide similarly candid feedback.”


61. “One of the outcomes of attempting to ignore emotional pain is chandeliering. We think we’ve packed the hurt so far down that it can’t possibly resurface, yet all of a sudden, a seemingly innocuous comment sends us into a rage or sparks a crying fit. Or maybe a small mistake at work triggers a huge shame attack. Perhaps a colleague’s constructive feedback hits that exquisitely tender place and we jump out of our skin.”


62. “There is no failure. Only feedback.”


63. “In our experience, accountable people constantly seek feedback from a wide range of associates, be their friends, family, business partners, consultants, or other advisers.”


64. “The pace of change for entrepreneurs is rapidly accelerating, and the cost and risk of launching a new business and getting off the ground is just amazing. The ability to gain user feedback really quickly and adapt to what your consumers want is totally different with the web as it is now. But finding a new market, helping people and taking that original idea and turning it into a business is really exciting right now.”


65. “Refuse to attach a negative meaning to the word ‘no.’ View it as feedback. ‘No’ tells you to change your approach, create more value or try again later.” – Anthony Iannarino


66. “Plan to meet with your team at least weekly to give feedback on performance.


67. “Purposeful planning is most effective when you are actively seeking and getting feedback from those whose judgement you trust and respect.”


68. Focus feedback on actions.


69. “I want to make clear that my feedback comes from a place of loyalty and persistent gratitude. I love Twitter.” – Chris Sacca


70. When the customers have genuine positive feedback and experience before and after their purchase, they are more likely to purchase again and will recommend the product to their friends and relatives.


71. “Therefore, we need to be selective about the feedback we let into our lives. For me, if you’re not in the arena getting your ass kicked, I’m not interested in your feedback.”


72. “Getting employee feedback on the well-being culture can be very helpful in assessing progress.”


73. “If you’re not in the arena also getting your ass kicked, I’m not interested in your feedback.”


74. “Whether professionals have a chance to develop intuitive expertise depends essentially on the quality and speed of feedback, as well as on sufficient opportunity to practice.”


75. “You can’t take criticism and feedback from people who are not being brave with their lives. It just will crush you.”


76. “When receiving feedback, we can identify a value-supporting behaviour or a piece of self-talk to help in the moment. Here’s mine: When I’m receiving feedback, and I want to stay aligned with my value of courage, I say to myself, “I’m brave enough to listen.”


77. “I really like negative feedback, because it makes me aware of my mistakes to correct them immediately and learn from them at the same time.”


78. “Use feedback analysis to identify your strengths. Then go to work on improving your strengths. Identify and eliminate bad habits that hinder the full development of your strengths. Figure out what you should do and do it. Finally, decide what you should not do.”


79. In our industry, our consumers are foremost. Your feedback is appreciated by us.


80. “spouse. Make sure it relates to your primary love language and will help replenish your empty tank. 3. When your spouse responds and meets your need, you will be able to react with not only your will but your emotions as well. Without overreacting, continue positive feedback and affirmation of your spouse at these times. 4. As your marriage begins to truly heal and grow deeper, make sure you don’t “rest on your laurels” and forget your spouse’s love language and daily needs. You’re on the road to your dreams, so stay there! Put appointments into your schedule to assess together how you’re doing. A Personal Word Well, what do you think? Having”


81. “If you’re not in the arena also getting your ass kicked, I’m not interested in your feedback.” – Brené Brown


82. “I’m just being honest” is a poor excuse for being rude. Candor is being forthcoming in what you say. Respect is being considerate in how you say it. Being direct with the content of your feedback doesn’t prevent you from being thoughtful about the best way to deliver it. Adam Grant, Organizational Psychologist


83. “Really pay attention to negative feedback and solicit it, particularly from friends… Hardly anyone does that, and it’s incredibly helpful.”


84. Find everything that’s wrong with it and fix it. Seek negative feedback, particularly from friends.”


85. “Be realistic we're told. Listen to feedback. Play well with others. Compromise. Well, what if the "other" party is wrong? What if conventional wisdom is too conservative? It's this all-too-common impulse to complain, defer, and then give up that holds us back.”


86. Critics only make you stronger. You have to look at what they are saying as feedback. Sometimes the feedback helps, and other times, it’s just noise that can be a distraction.”


87. “The constructive feedback environment doesn’t make an employee feel less when he makes a mistake. Instead, it turns it into an opportunity to upgrade their performance.” ― zippia.com


88. “how you can be a better spouse, and regardless of the other’s attitude, act on what he or she tells you. Continue to both seek more input and comply with those wishes with all your heart and will. Assure your spouse that your motives are pure. 2. When you receive positive feedback, you know there is progress. Each month make one nonthreatening but specific request that is easy for your spouse.”


89. “Really pay attention to negative feedback and solicit it, particularly from friends. Hardly anyone does that, and it’s incredibly helpful.”


90. “The best feedback is what we don’t want to hear. – George Raveling” Tweet: The best feedback is what we don’t want to hear. - George Raveling


91. “We dramatically underestimate how powerful appreciation is. For instance, just getting a simple thank you after you give somebody feedback on a job application cover letter. Would you have guessed that just the words ‘thank you’ would be enough to not only lead to a 50% increase that they’re willing to help you again, but also then make them more likely to help somebody else who reaches out?”


92. “When we stop caring about what people think, we lose our capacity for connection. When we become defined by what people think, we lose our willingness to be vulnerable. If we dismiss all the criticism, we lose out on important feedback, but if we subject ourselves to the hatefulness, our spirits gets crushed. It's a tightrope, shame resilience is the balance bar, and the safety net below is the one or two people in our lives who can help us reality-check the criticism and cynicism.”


93. “It is a lot easier for people to adopt a product that provides a strong positive sensory signal, for example the mint taste of toothpaste, than it is to adopt a habit that does not provide pleasurable sensory feedback, like flossing one’s teeth.


94. I wanted to share the positive feedback we’ve gotten from customers. Member satisfaction numbers are up 4 percent this quarter, during incredibly challenging times. We all have a lot to be proud of, especially Dre and Stef. Thanks for your contribution.


95. “Let compliments or concerned questions boomerang right back to the giver. Like the French, quickly murmur something that expresses, ‘That’s very kind of you.’ Don’t just say ‘thank you.’ If she says, “I like those shoes,” you say, ‘Oh, I’m so happy you told me. I just got them.’ He says, ‘You did a really good job on this project,’ you say, ‘Oh, that’s so nice of you to say. I appreciate your positive feedback.’”


96. “True intuitive expertise is learned from prolonged experience with good feedback on mistakes.” ~ Daniel Kahneman


97. “We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve.”


98. “The secret killer of innovation is shame. You can’t measure it, but it is there. Every time someone holds back on a new idea, fails to give their manager much needed feedback, and is afraid to speak up in front of a client you can be sure shame played a part. That deep fear we all have of being wrong, of being belittled and of feeling less than, is what stops us taking the very risks required to move our companies forward. If you want a culture of creativity and innovation, where sensible risks are embraced on both a market and individual level, start by developing the ability of managers to cultivate an openness to vulnerability in their teams. And this, paradoxically perhaps, requires first that they are vulnerable themselves. This notion that the leader needs to be “in charge” and to “know all the answers” is both dated and destructive. Its impact on others is the sense that they know less, and that they are less than. A recipe for risk aversion if ever I have heard it. Shame becomes fear. Fear leads to risk aversion. Risk aversion kills innovation.”


99. Just like a board game, the world is always providing us with instant feedback.


100. “I think it’s very important to have a feedback loop, where you’re constantly thinking about what you’ve done and how you could be doing it better. I think that’s the single best piece of advice: constantly think about how you could be doing things better and questioning yourself.”


101. “Bad emotions, bad parents, and bad feedback have more impact than good ones, and bad information is processed more thoroughly than good.”


102. “I only accept and pay attention to feedback from people who are also in the arena. If you're occasionally getting your butt kicked as you respond, and if you're also figuring out how to stay open to feedback without getting pummeled by insults, I'm more likely to pay attention to your thought about my work. If, on the other hand, you're not helping, contributing, or wrestling with your own gremlins, I'm not at all interested in your commentary.”


103. Feedback is what champions thrive on. Do not be afraid to get feedback now and then. It is a great tool to improve yourself.


104. “Games reflect behavior. They are instant feedback systems.”


105. “Os líderes seniores devem fazer perguntas e, em seguida, dar feedback, para que os líderes seniores entendam as ramificações de seus planos estratégicos.”


106. “If you are not in the arena getting your ass kicked on occasion, I’m not interested in or open to your feedback.” – Dare to Lead


107. “Direct, personal feedback really is the simplest and most effective form of motivation.”


108. “You want to be extra rigorous about making the best possible thing you can. Find everything that’s wrong with it and fix it. Seek negative feedback, particularly from friends.” – Elon Musk


109. “I want to be in the arena. I want to be brave with my life. And when we make the choice to dare greatly, we sign up to get our asses kicked. We can choose courage or we can choose comfort, but we can’t have both. Not at the same time. Vulnerability is not winning or losing; it’s having the courage to show up and be seen when we have no control over the outcome. Vulnerability is not weakness; it’s our greatest measure of courage. A lot of cheap seats in the arena are filled with people who never venture onto the floor. They just hurl mean-spirited criticisms and put-downs from a safe distance. The problem is, when we stop caring what people think and stop feeling hurt by cruelty, we lose our ability to connect. But when we’re defined by what people think, we lose the courage to be vulnerable. Therefore, we need to be selective about the feedback we let into our lives. For me, if you’re not in the arena getting your ass kicked, I’m not interested in your feedback.”


110. “Our secret weapon for building the best culture is open and honest feedback.”


111. Software innovation, like almost every other kind of innovation, requires the ability to collaborate and share ideas with other people, and to sit down and talk with customers and get their feedback and understand their needs. Bill Gates, Microsoft.


112. “Your brain is a reward detector. As you go about your life, your sensory nervous system is continuously monitoring which actions satisfy your desire and deliver pleasure. Feelings of pleasure and disappointment are part of the feedback mechanism that help your brain distinguish useful actions from useless ones. Rewards close the feedback loop and complete the habit cycle.”


113. “In a study, teachers who wrote feedback with the copy, “I’m giving you these comments because I have very high expectations and I know you can reach them” (vs. a generic note), twice as many students chose to revise their papers. High standards plus assurance is a powerful formula.”


114. “Be open to growth. When people stop giving you feedback, start to worry.” – Amanda Pouchot, Entrepreneur


115. “A constructive feedback environment is a valuable tool for improving overall team performance.” ― zippia.com


116. I think it’s very important to have a feedback loop, where you’re constantly thinking about what you’ve done and how you could be doing it better.


117. “Our secret weapon for building the best culture is open and honest feedback.”– Gina Lau


118. “Productive givers focus on acting in the long-term best interests of others, even if it's not pleasant. They have the courage to give the critical feedback we prefer not to hear, but truly need to hear. They offer tough love, knowing that we might like them less, but we'll come to trust and respect them more”


119. “Your body provides you with constant feedback that can help improve your running performance while minimizing biomechanical stress. Learn to differentiate between the discomfort of effort and the pain of injury. When you practice listening, you increase competence in persevering through the former and responding with respect and compassion to the latter.” – Gina Greenlee


120. In its simplest form, communication is talking and listening; however, unless talking and listening are accompanied by honest, loving feedback on the part of the listener, little communication can take place. – Dr. Gary Chapman


121. To a pitcher, a base hit is the perfect example of negative feedback. — Steve Hovley.


122. “Been seeing the posts about the insensitivity of some past ANTM moments and I agree with you. Looking back, those were some really off choices. Appreciate your honest feedback and am sending so much love and virtual hugs.”- Tyra Banks


123. “Social recognition is the practice of people recognizing and rewarding each other’s efforts, using positive feedback to unlock human potential… It’s the foundation for creating a more human workplace because it reinforces shared purpose and gives individual meaning through gratitude.”


124. I believe in accessibility. I believe in honesty and a culture that supports that. And you can’t have that if you’re not open to receiving feedback. – Mindy Grossman


125. “A habit is a behavior that has been repeated enough times to become automatic. ■ The ultimate purpose of habits is to solve the problems of life with as little energy and effort as possible. ■ Any habit can be broken down into a feedback loop that involves four steps: cue, craving, response, and reward. ■ The Four Laws of Behavior Change are a simple set of rules we can use to build better habits. They are (1) make it obvious, (2) make it attractive, (3) make it easy, and (4) make it satisfying.”


126. It's so important to reach out to people you trust, and who can give you honest feedback, and keep those people close to you. You don't want to surround yourself with enablers. — Tim Gunn


127. Your feedback and suggestions can do miracles for us. We are pleased for your precious feedback and time.


128. “Know your communities well! Ask your customers questions and get feedback, get to know them and their needs, chat with other small businesses, work together, and above all: support each other!” —Andrew Young, chef and owner of Bubble and Brown Bakery


129. “Both employees and senior management must accept the fact that feedback creates accountability. Employees must overcome the fear of risk and tell inquiring senior managers what they really need to hear.”


130. “We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve.” – Bill Gates


131. “It’s so important to reach out to people you trust, and who can give you honest feedback, and keep those people close to you. You don’t want to surround yourself with enablers.” – Tim Gunn


132. “Notice the similarities here: The recognition is spontaneous—not part of a scheduled feedback session—and it is targeted at particular behaviors.”


133. Please comment below and let us know your feedback about this article.


134. “Once people take ownership over the decision to receive feedback, they're less defensive about it.”


135. Critics only make you stronger. You have to look at what they are saying as feedback. Sometimes the feedback helps, and other times, it’s just noise that can be a distraction.” – Robert Kiyosaki


136. “When a measure becomes a target, it ceases to be a good measure.” Measurement is only useful when it guides you and adds context to a larger picture, not when it consumes you. Each number is simply one piece of feedback in the overall system.”


137. “Embrace the five-minute favor! Adam Rifkin’s favorite offers are to give honest feedback and to make an intro.”


138. “Your habits shape your identity, and your identity shapes your habits. It’s a two-way street. The formation of all habits is a feedback loop”


139. “Acquisition of skills requires a regular environment, an adequate opportunity to practice, and rapid and unequivocal feedback about the correctness of thoughts and actions.”


140. Your feedback and reviews have been supporting us in developing our industry. Thanks a lot.


141. “Help people realize that when they fail to provide peers with constructive feedback they are letting them down personally. By holding back, we are hurting not only the team, but also our teammates themselves.”


142. Cultivate a network of trusted mentors and colleagues. Other people can give us the best insight into ourselves—and our own limitations. We must have the courage to ask for help and to request feedback to expand our vision of what's possible.”


143. “Mastery requires feedback.”


144. “Remember, feedback is meant to address the problem, not the person.”


145. “We run a transparent roadmap process with an open-door policy, encouraging feedback and input from customers and employees. We also proactively solicit input from the team via office hours and open lunches with leadership, including an anonymized Q&A. We believe operating a high-trust environment requires making space for potentially uncomfortable questions, but that’s how the best work gets done.” — Josh Koenig, Pantheon Systems, Inc.


146. “I think it’s very important to have a feedback loop, where you’re constantly thinking about what you’ve done and how you could be doing it better.”


147. “To become more effective and fulfilled at work, people need a keen understanding of their impact on others and the extent to which they’re achieving their goals in their working relationships. Direct feedback is the most efficient way for them to gather this information and learn from it.”


148. “Really pay attention to negative feedback and solicit it, particularly from friends. Hardly anyone does that and its incredibly helpful.” Elon Musk


149. “Loving a baby is a circular business, a kind of feedback loop. The more you give the more you get and the more you get the more you feel like giving.” – Penelope Leach


150. “No matter how good you think you are as a leader, my goodness, the people around you will have all kinds of ideas for how you can get better. So for me, the most fundamental thing about leadership is to have the humility to continue to get feedback and to try to get better – because your job is to try to help everybody else get better.”


151. “When people join a group, they look for cues about appropriate behavior. The visibility of giving can affect reciprocity styles significantly. In many domains of life, people end up taking because they don’t have access to info about what others are doing. A team of psychologists surveyed more than 800 Californians about their energy consumption. They asked the Californians how important the following factors were in shaping their decisions to save energy — it saves money, it protects the environment, it benefits society, a lot of other people are doing it. The Californians consistently reported that the most important factor was protecting the environment and following the lead of other people was last. The team wanted to see if people were right about their own motivations, so they visited nearly 400 homes in San Marcos and randomly assigned them to receive door hangers around each of the four topics. When asked how motivating the door hangers were, the residents whose hangers emphasized joining their neighbors reported the lowest motivation. But when the team looked at the residents’ energy bills, they found that the residents were wrong about what motivated them. The residents whose door hangers emphasized joining their neighbors actually conserved the most energy. Subsequent door hangers that provided feedback on whether residents were consuming less or more than their neighbors motivated electricity takers to significantly reduce their consumption — but the effect grew stronger the closer and more similar the group was to the residents.”


152. “The more successful people have been in the past, the worse they perform when they enter a new environment. They become overconfident, and they’re less likely to seek critical feedback even though the context is radically different.”


153. “The problem is, when we stop caring what people think and stop feeling hurt by cruelty, we lose our ability to connect. But when we’re defined by what people think, we lose the courage to be vulnerable. Therefore, we need to be selective about the feedback we let into our lives. For me, if you’re not in the arena getting your ass kicked, I’m not interested in your feedback.”


154. “There are many systems of interaction between the brain, body and social world that can get caught in positive feedback loops.” – Jordan Peterson


155. “A lot of cheap seats in the arena are filled with people who never venture onto the floor. They just hurl mean-spirited criticisms and put-downs from a safe distance. The problem is, when we stop caring what people think and stop feeling hurt by cruelty, we lose our ability to connect. But when we’re defined by what people think, we lose the courage to be vulnerable. Therefore, we need to be selective about the feedback we let into our lives. For me, if you’re not in the arena getting your ass kicked, I’m not interested in your feedback.”


156. Your contribution has helped us be where we are today. We are grateful for your sincere feedback. Thank you for your continued patronage.


157. “There is no failure. Only feedback.” — Robert Allen


158. “If you are not in the arena getting your ass kicked on occasion, I’m not interested in or open to your feedback. There are a million cheap seats in the world today filled with people who will never be brave with their lives but who will spend every ounce of energy they have hurling advice and judgment at those who dare greatly. Their only contributions are criticism, cynicism, and fearmongering. If you’re criticizing from a place where you’re not also putting yourself on the line, I’m not interested in what you have to say.”


159. “Members of trusting teams admit weaknesses and mistakes, take risks in offering feedback and assistance, and focus time and energy on important issues, not politics.”


160. “I think it’s very important to have a feedback loop, where you’re constantly thinking about what you’ve done and how you could be doing it better. I think that’s the single best piece of advice: constantly think about how you could be doing things better and questioning yourself.” – Elon Musk


161. “We can’t take or receive feedback if we are incapable of or uninterested in hearing from outside sources. We can’t recognize opportunities—or create them—if instead of seeing what is in front of us, we live inside our own fantasy.”


162. “Make feedback normal. Not a performance review.”


163. “Really pay attention to negative feedback and solicit it, particularly from friends. … Hardly anyone does that, and it’s incredibly helpful.” – Elon Musk


164. Our secret weapon for building the best culture is open and honest feedback.


165. “Loving a baby is a circular business, a kind of feedback loop. The more you give the more you get and the more you get the more you feel like giving.” — Penelope Leach


166. I know that the work is good and they're excited over at ABC and Disney and it's getting some really good feedback. It's not just a little, insignificant kind of role. It's meaty, which is good. - Author: Josh Holloway


167. Games reflect behavior. They are instant feedback systems.


168. “What is the shortest word in the English language that contains the letters: abcdef? Answer: feedback. Don’t forget that feedback is one of the essential elements of good communication.”


169. “Productive givers focus on acting in the long-term best interests of others, even if it’s not pleasant. They have the courage to give the critical feedback we prefer not to hear, but truly need to hear. They offer tough love, knowing that we might like them less, but we’ll come to trust and respect them more.”


170. “True intuitive expertise is learned from prolonged experience with good feedback on mistakes.”


171. “This pitfall is evident in many areas of life. We focus on working long hours instead of getting meaningful work done. We care more about getting ten thousand steps than we do about being healthy. We teach for standardized tests instead of emphasizing learning, curiosity, and critical thinking. In short, we optimize for what we measure. When we choose the wrong measurement, we get the wrong behavior. This is sometimes referred to as Goodhart’s Law. Named after the economist Charles Goodhart, the principle states, “When a measure becomes a target, it ceases to be a good measure.” Measurement is only useful when it guides you and adds context to a larger picture, not when it consumes you. Each number is simply one piece of feedback in the overall system.”


172. “Imagine a person who enjoys alcohol, perhaps a bit too much. He has a quick three or four drinks. His blood alcohol level spikes sharply. This can be extremely exhilarating, particularly for someone who has a genetic predisposition to alcoholism.23 But it only occurs while blood alcohol levels are actively rising, and that only continues if the drinker keeps drinking. When he stops, not only does his blood alcohol level plateau and then start to sink, but his body begins to produce a variety of toxins, as it metabolizes the ethanol already consumed. He also starts to experience alcohol withdrawal, as the anxiety systems that were suppressed during intoxication start to hyper-respond. A hangover is alcohol withdrawal (which quite frequently kills withdrawing alcoholics), and it starts all too soon after drinking ceases. To continue the warm glow, and stave off the unpleasant aftermath, the drinker may just continue to drink, until all the liquor in his house is consumed, the bars are closed and his money is spent. The next day, the drinker wakes up, badly hungover. So far, this is just unfortunate. The real trouble starts when he discovers that his hangover can be “cured” with a few more drinks the morning after. Such a cure is, of course, temporary. It merely pushes the withdrawal symptoms a bit further into the future. But that might be what is required, in the short term, if the misery is sufficiently acute. So now he has learned to drink to cure his hangover. When the medication causes the disease, a positive feedback loop has been established.”


173. “We can’t just sit back and wait for feedback to be offered, particularly when we’re in a leadership role. If we want feedback to take root in the culture, we need to explicitly ask for it.”


174. A great big thank you for shopping with [company name]. We love our customers dearly, and hearing your feedback is so helpful to us. If you have a few minutes to answer a quick survey, we’d be very grateful.


175. “There are many systems of interaction between brain, body and social world that can get caught in positive feedback loops. Depressed people, for example, can start feeling useless and burdensome, as well as grief-stricken and pained. This makes them withdraw from contact with friends and family. Then the withdrawal makes them more lonesome and isolated, and more likely to feel useless and burdensome. Then they withdraw more. In this manner, depression spirals and amplifies”


176. “Really pay attention to negative feedback and solicit it, particularly from friends. … Hardly anyone does that, and it’s incredibly helpful.”


177. “we always have team members go back to their direct reports and share their profile information. This serves three purposes. First, it provides a great opportunity for demonstrating vulnerability with their subordinates. Second, it gives those subordinates real insights into their leaders, so that they’ll feel more comfortable providing feedback and interpreting behavior correctly. Third, it helps the executives develop a better understanding of their own profiles, because teaching is one of the best ways of learning.”


178. “A aquisição de habilidades exige um ambiente regular, uma oportunidade adequada para praticar e um feedback rápido e inequívoco sobre a precisão dos pensamentos e ações.”


179. “Here’s the other part: once you win, everyone is gunning for you. It’s during your moment at the top that you can afford ego the least—because the stakes are so much higher, the margins for error are so much smaller. If anything, your ability to listen, to hear feedback, to improve and grow matter more now than ever before.”


180. “Don’t solicit feedback on your product, idea or your business just for validation purposes. You want to tell the people who can help move your idea forward, but if you’re just looking to your friend, co-worker, husband or wife for validation, be careful. It can stop a lot of multimillion-dollar ideas in their tracks in the beginning.”

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