top of page

229 Unifying Quotes About Diversity and Inclusion (2023)

1. “We have the ability to achieve, if we master the necessary goodwill, a common global society blessed with a shared culture of peace that is nourished by the ethnic, national and local diversities that enrich our lives.” 


2. “We need to resist the tyranny of low expectations. We need to open our eyes to the inequality that remains. We won’t unlock the full potential of the workplace until we see how far from equality we really are. ” — Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook (Source: Thrive Global)


3. “Diversity, inclusion, respect and fairness are concepts that make some people reluctant to discuss them. I work hard to create a safe, nonjudgmental and uplifting environment that makes exploring sensitive topics a positive journey for all… All programs, processes and resources reflect my belief that we are all more effective, productive and innovative when we honor and value our own uniqueness while at the same time valuing and respecting the differences of others.” - Leonora Billings-Harris, President and CEO, UbuntuGlobal


4. “Inclusivity means not just ‘we’re allowed to be there’, but ‘we are valued’. I’ve always said: smart teams will do amazing things, but truly diverse teams will do impossible things. ” —Claudia Brind-Woody, Business Executive and Vice President and Managing Director of Intellectual Property at IBM


5. “Inclusive leadership is like good cooking: you need a chef (inclusive leader) who knows how to choose good ingredients (diversity) and how to combine them using a good recipe (inclusion).” - Thais Compoint, Award-Winning Global Specialist in Inclusion and Diversity


6. “We all have the ability to promote a culture of acceptance and inclusion — and that is something I believe every leader has a responsibility to do. It starts with having a dialogue until we are all comfortable and no longer have the fear of saying the wrong thing. ”


7. “Inclusive leadership is like good cooking: you need a chef (inclusive leader) who knows how to choose good ingredients (diversity) and how to combine them using a good recipe (inclusion). ” - Thais Compoint, Award-Winning Global Specialist in Inclusion and Diversity


8. “If you believe, as we believe, that diversity leads to better products, and we’re all about making products that enrich people’s lives, then you obviously put a ton of energy behind diversity the same way you would put a ton of energy behind anything else that is truly important.” – Tim Cook


9. “The value of a diverse team is its capacity to challenge the norm of groupthink and thus boost organizational performance and improve decision-making. ” — Yrthya Dinsey-Flores, Culture and Operations Chief at Open Society Foundations


10. “A shared vocabulary in the workplace would be so valuable. When I learned terms like ‘cis,’ it helped me think about things and made it easier to talk about issues with my wife. But how do you explain ‘nonbinary’ to a factory-floor mechanic from Georgia? If my colleagues had the right language, it would make conversations a thousand times easier.”


11. “We all have the ability to promote a culture of acceptance and inclusion — and that is something I believe every leader has a responsibility to do. It starts with having a dialogue until we are all comfortable and no longer have the fear of saying the wrong thing. ” — Inga Beale


12. Real diversity and inclusion doesn't mean that we will always agree. It means that even when we disagree, we can still respect each other. –Justin Jones-Fosu, The Inclusive Mindset: How to Cultivate Diversity in Your Everyday Life


13. “A company embracing D&I needs to do a lot more than just recruit diverse candidates. D&I is a cultural journey, and it has to start with building awareness, imparting education and spotlighting cultural gains from embracing a more inclusive culture at the company. It should become a habit to focus on ideas instead of the person behind the idea. And ideas should become truly “colorless. ” — Suresh Chintada, Subex


14. “Today when I think about diversity, I actually think about the word ‘inclusion.' And I think this is a time of great inclusion. It's not men, it's not women alone. Whether it's geographic, it's approach, it's your style, it's your way of learning, the way you want to contribute, it's your age - it's really broad.” - Ginni Rometty, Executive Chairman of IBM


15. “We're supposed to be bringing out-of-the-box thinking and innovation, and you cannot do that unless you've got diversity. . . It's everything from gender to ethnicity to geographic diversity. ” - Julie Sweet, CEO of Accenture


16. “Businesses perform better when you have diversity of view in your senior leadership positions. This is not just the right thing to do socially; it's the right thing to do for your business. ” - Ruth Porat, Chief Financial Officer of Alphabet Inc. and Google


17. “Diversity and inclusion is less about a program, and more about helping people become comfortable enough to have a dialog about their experiences—including times when we have felt like an outsider.” - Carin Taylor, Chief Diversity Officer, Workday


18. “Our workforce and our entire economy are strongest when we embrace diversity to its fullest, and that means opening doors of opportunity to everyone. ” — Tom Perez, Politician, Attorney and Chair of the DNC (Democratic National Committee)


19. “Diversity requires commitment. Achieving superior performance diversity can produce further action– most notably, a commitment to develop a culture of inclusion. People do not just need to be different, they need to be fully involved and feel their voices are heard.”


20. “We need women at all levels, including the top, to change the dynamic, reshape the conversation, to make sure women’s voices are heard and heeded, not overlooked and ignored. ” — Sheryl Sandberg, Chief Operating Officer of Facebook


21. “I believe our greatness lives within our differences and the world wants to divide us. But we were meant to come together in every arena as one, bringing with us our different perspectives, diversity, cultures, and ideas.” 


22. “The mantra of ‘diversity and inclusion’ can be understood as part of a normative project that seeks to present the superficial appearance of racial diversity while leaving white supremacist institutions and structures fundamentally unchallenged (Ahmed 2012). ”


23. “Data-informed decision making is so important, specifically when we are talking about DEI. Rather than just aiming for a quick fix to improve your numbers in terms of diversity, data-informed hiring allows for you to evaluate the physical characteristics such as ethnicity and gender, but also characteristics of diversity of thought, education, or experience that have immense value. ” — Kimya Lee, Executive director, strategic workforce planning and analysis at the Department of Homeland Security


24. “There are not more than five musical notes, yet the combinations of these five give rise to more melodies than can ever be heard. There are not more than five primary colors, yet in combination they produce more hues than can ever been seen. There are not more than five cardinal tastes, yet combinations of them yield more flavors than can ever be tasted. ”


25. “Businesses perform better when you have diversity of view in your senior leadership positions. This is not just the right thing to do socially; it's the right thing to do for your business.” - Ruth Porat, Chief Financial Officer of Alphabet Inc. and Google


26. “Real diversity and inclusion doesn't mean that we will always agree. It means that even when we disagree, we can still respect each other. We can vehemently disagree with someone's ideology while passionately pursuing their humanity.” 


27. “While globalization will make the world smaller and more accessible, we must continue to appreciate its vibrant diversity. ” - Jean-Philippe Courtois, Executive Vice President and President, Microsoft Global Sales, Marketing and Operations


28. “Diversity is a fact, but inclusion is a choice we make every day. As leaders, we have to put out the message that we embrace, and not just tolerate, diversity. ” — Nellie Borrero, Global Inclusion and Diversity Managing Director at Accenture


29. “Integrating into the work people do every day also helps it become more doable … more feasible. I think those are some of the messages and the ways I’ve seen it (DEI work) resonate with people. ” — Angela Allen, Country Financial Diversity and Inclusion Program Manager


30. “In today’s interconnected and globalized world, it is now commonplace for people of dissimilar world views, faiths and races to live side by side. It is a matter of great urgency, therefore, that we find ways to cooperate with one another in a spirit of mutual acceptance and respect. ” – Dalai Lama


31. “We need to give each other the space to grow, to be ourselves, to exercise our diversity. We need to give each other space so that we may both give and receive such beautiful things as ideas, openness, dignity, joy, healing, and inclusion.”


32. “I’ve traveled around the world, and what’s so revealing is that, despite the differences in culture, politics, language, how people dress, there is a universal feeling that we all want the same thing. We deeply want to be respected and appreciated for our differences.” – Howard Schultz


33. “The way to ensure team members have a voice is to create a corporate communication structure that reflects this goal. We have cross-functional team meetings to get input from stakeholders in every department, from sales and product development to marketing and applications engineering. We also have a tiger team composed of department leaders who convey the thoughts and opinions of their staff. ” — Julie Song, Advanced RF Technologies, Inc


34. “We could learn a lot from crayons: some are sharp, some are pretty, some are dull, while others bright, some have weird names, but they have all learned to live in the same box. ” - Robert Fulghum, Author of All I Really Need To Know, I Learned in Kindergarten


35. “Many conversations about diversity and inclusion do not happen in the boardroom because people are embarrassed at using unfamiliar words or afraid of saying the wrong thing — yet this is the very place we need to be talking about it


36. “Our strategic discussions are a joint team exercise that explicitly goes through a phase to identify and gather input from all team members. This ensures we have surveyed the landscape and formed a full picture before narrowing the focus toward execution. We also collaborate with the product development teams and the diversity and inclusion office to create a “diversity by design” process. ” — Arthur Hu, Lenovo


37. “I do think that treating everyone equally no matter where they come from, no matter who they are and what role they have, is a big key, because you never know who you’re talking to, really. You never know where they’ve been. You never know where they’re going. So, it just makes a lot of good sense to treat everyone the same and treat them well. ” — Arlan Hamilton


38. “Supporting DEI in the workplace is a business imperative, not just the right thing to do from a societal perspective. He believes that, just like anything that matters in business, companies have to be willing to put money into DEI. If you’re not willing to pay for it, it’s not a real commitment. ” — Paris Wallace, Co-founder of Ovia


39. “We run a transparent roadmap process with an open-door policy, encouraging feedback and input from customers and employees. We also proactively solicit input from the team via office hours and open lunches with leadership, including an anonymized Q&A. We believe operating a high-trust environment requires making space for potentially uncomfortable questions, but that’s how the best work gets done. ” — Josh Koenig, Pantheon Systems, Inc


40. “The D&I subject isn’t new; 2020 was simply a wake-up call for companies. Advancing workplace diversity is more important today than ever before. I suggest focusing on talent and engaging professionals who can accelerate emerging technologies and solve complex problems. This will help drive diversity in teams and bring broad perspectives together, generating better business results. ” — Azmath Pasha, Paradigm Technology


41. “Indulge your taste for diversity and inclusion. Declare that you are a force for good and will not settle to accept what is unjust for humanity. Dare to say that you will be a difference maker and help change the narrative for generations to come.” 


42. “There are different ways to do innovation. You can plant a lot of seeds, not be committed to any particular one of them, but just see what grows. And this really isn’t how we’ve approached this. We go mission-first, then focus on the pieces we need and go deep on them and be committed to them. ”


43. “A group of people get together and exist as an institution we call a company so they are able to accomplish something collectively that they could not accomplish separately – they make a contribution to society, a phrase which sounds trite but is fundamental. ”


44. “Action to achieve sociocultural diversity—closely overseen by top management—must be part of a transformation project for the company as a whole. . . . The mobilization of the management team and the whole organization must be strong and visible, both to employees and to external stakeholders such as consumers, investors, the media, and the general public. ”


45. “When I think about everyone else who has to deal with coming out, whether that be in a safe or unsafe environment, I recommend to just think about whether or not it's the right time for you, if the person you're coming out to will make you a better person, and be in the right company. But don't be afraid to do it if it's a safe environment. ”


46. “For me personally, the value that I bring is only evident when I don’t have to pretend or perform. When I can be my true authentic self, I can be the best version of me that I can be. That’s the true value of inclusion.” — Kim Jenkins, global head of diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging at PayPal.


47. “We need to give each other the space to grow, to be ourselves, to exercise our diversity. We need to give each other space so that we may both give and receive such beautiful things as ideas, openness, dignity, joy, healing, and inclusion.”


48. “If you haven’t hired a team of people who are of color, female, and/or LGBT to actively turn over every stone, to scope out every nook and cranny, to pop out of every bush, to find every qualified underrepresented founder in this country, you’re going to miss out on a lot of money when the rest of the investment world gets it. ” 


49. “We need to give each other the space to grow, to be ourselves, to exercise our diversity. We need to give each other space so that we may both give and receive such beautiful things as ideas, openness, dignity, joy, healing, and inclusion. ” — Max De Pree, Business Executive and Writer


50. “Without an inclusive environment, even an organization with a diverse employee population will probably struggle to improve its long-term performance. The widespread adoption of hybrid work has complicated the struggle to build and maintain such cultures.”


51. “Diversity and inclusion cannot simply be delegated to one individual. That is a cop-out. It should be on the CEO’s plate as a priority and central to the HR agenda, not something that ebbs and flows with the quality of a diversity and inclusion leader. ”


52. “We all have the ability to promote a culture of acceptance and inclusion — and that is something I believe every leader has a responsibility to do. It starts with having a dialogue until we are all comfortable and no longer have the fear of saying the wrong thing.” 


53. “Diversity, inclusion, respect and fairness are concepts that make some people reluctant to discuss them. I work hard to create a safe, nonjudgmental and uplifting environment that makes exploring sensitive topics a positive journey for all… All programs, processes and resources reflect my belief that we are all more effective, productive and innovative when we honor and value our own uniqueness while at the same time valuing and respecting the differences of others. ” - Leonora Billings-Harris, President and CEO, UbuntuGlobal


54. “Unconscious perceptions govern many of the most important decisions we make and have a profound effect on the lives of many people in many ways… Unconscious patterns play out in ways that are so subtle they are hard to spot.”


55. “Employees who believe that management is concerned about them as a whole person – not just an employee – are more productive, more satisfied, more fulfilled. Satisfied employees mean satisfied customers, which leads to profitability. ”


56. “The most critical action leaders can take to promote diversity and inclusion over the long term is to model, through their actions, how to honor and respect the dignity of every single person. When a company instills a people-centered culture as the priority, it can leverage the strengths and voices of a diverse set of people in the development of strategies, products, and services. — David Dewolf, 3 Pillar Global


57. “Inclusion is the story of sunlight falling equally on the garden of flowers (Diversity) and the gardeners (Inclusive Leaders) tending to the plants to grow and flower. Some plants need extra support, some need extra care and nutrition. The sun merely shining (Equality) cannot impact all equally unless they are made receptive (Equity). Only then, can these flowers bloom and bear fruits


58. “We recognize the power and influence that we have to create change beyond our own walls. And we know that if we can help our portfolio companies become more inclusive, more equitable, that can help drive long-term performance. ”


59. “We believe our diversity, our differences, when joined together by a common set of ideals, makes us stronger, makes us more creative, makes us different. From all these different strands, we make something new. ” — Barack Obama, 44th President of the United States of America


60. “Diverse teams bring a wealth of perspective that is critical to long-term success. I believe in fostering innovation by embedding it at the cultural level in our core principles. This enables staff at all levels to feel empowered to share their insights. A key part of creating this culture of innovation is to measure diverse ideas through reviews, promotions, raises and rewards. ” — Chuck Canton, Sourcepass Inc


61. “I really encourage, especially hiring managers and leaders, to name what areas of diversity they want to focus on. If you can’t name it, you’re not going to be able to change it or measure it. Again, we need more hiring managers to move away from the culture fit equation and move toward culture add.”


62. “The way to ensure team members have a voice is to create a corporate communication structure that reflects this goal. We have cross-functional team meetings to get input from stakeholders in every department, from sales and product development to marketing and applications engineering. We also have a tiger team composed of department leaders who convey the thoughts and opinions of their staff. ” — Julie Song, Advanced RF Technologies, Inc


63. “Many conversations about diversity and inclusion do not happen in the boardroom because people are embarrassed at using unfamiliar words or afraid of saying the wrong thing — yet this is the very place we need to be talking about it. The business case speaks for itself — diverse teams are more innovative and successful in going after new markets. ” —  Inga Beale, Business Executive and former CEO of Lloyd’s of London


64. “A company embracing D&I needs to do a lot more than just recruit diverse candidates. D&I is a cultural journey, and it has to start with building awareness, imparting education and spotlighting cultural gains from embracing a more inclusive culture at the company. It should become a habit to focus on ideas instead of the person behind the idea. And ideas should become truly “colorless. ” — Suresh Chintada, Subex


65. “We recognize the power and influence that we have to create change beyond our own walls. And we know that if we can help our portfolio companies become more inclusive, more equitable, that can help drive long-term performance.”


66. “I’ve traveled around the world, and what’s so revealing is that, despite the differences in culture, politics, language, how people dress, there is a universal feeling that we all want the same thing. We deeply want to be respected and appreciated for our differences. ” – Howard Schultz


67. “When employees can bring their authentic selves to work, they become better educated about different cultures, experiences and expressions, helping them to build trust as colleagues and provide better care for all their patients,” — Jackie Hunter, UVMHN


68. “There are not more than five musical notes, yet the combinations of these five give rise to more melodies than can ever be heard. There are not more than five primary colours, yet in combination they produce more hues than can ever been seen. There are not more than five cardinal tastes, yet combinations of them yield more flavours than can ever be tasted.”


69. “Imagine life as a game in which you are juggling some five balls in the air. You name them – work, family, health, friends and spirit and you’re keeping all of these in the air. You will soon understand that work is a rubber ball. If you drop it, it will bounce back. But the other four balls are made of glass. If you drop one of these, they will be irrevocably scuffed, marked, nicked, damaged, or even shattered. They will never be the same. You must understand that and strive for balance in your life. ”


70. “Diversity requires commitment. Achieving superior performance diversity can produce further action– most notably, a commitment to develop a culture of inclusion. People do not just need to be different, they need to be fully involved and feel their voices are heard. ”


71. “Without an inclusive environment, even an organization with a diverse employee population will probably struggle to improve its long-term performance. The widespread adoption of hybrid work has complicated the struggle to build and maintain such cultures. ”


72. “When Europeans arrived on this continent, they blew it with the Native Americans. They plowed over them, taking as much as they could of their land and valuables, and respecting almost nothing about the native cultures. They lost the wisdom of the indigenous peoples-wisdom about the land and connectedness to the great web of life…We have another chance with all these refugees. People come here penniless but not cultureless. They bring us gifts. We can synthesize the best of our traditions with the best of theirs. We can teach and learn from each other to produce a better America…”


73. “From the ground your eyes can only see a block or two. Stand on the terrace, and you could see much of a small town. The higher you go, the more you see - and as your horizon keeps expanding there comes a point when the entire planet unfolds in front of your eyes - no borders, no ideologies, no institutions - just one planet - one world. Divisions exist only in the mind of lower creatures - the higher you rise, the more undivided you become - and the more undivided you become, the more human you become. Look from the gutter, all you see is one culture. Look from the sky, and you'll see a world full of color. ”


74. “Allyship is stepping up in support of colleagues who are identified in another group: to support them, to create opportunities for them, to speak up when you see negative behaviors, and also to amplify and lift them up. ”


75. “An individual has not started living until he can rise above the narrow confines of his individualistic concerns to the broader concerns of all humanity. ” - Martin Luther King, Jr. , American Christian Minister and Civil Rights Activist


76. “Your supply chain strategy should have a diversity, equity and inclusion component that intentionally caters for ‘supply chain staffing’, ‘supply chain vendors’ and ‘benefactors of your supply chain network’. This leverages the creative gusto of a diverse workforce, unlocks innovation from a rich supplier base and ensures solutions are inclusive and sensitive to the needs of diverse supply chain benefactors. ”


77. “We believe diversity and inclusion are engines of innovation, creativity, progress, and happiness. Uncovering and nurturing the potential of people around the globe is our business. ” - Ranjit de Sousa, President, Lee Hecht Harrison


78. “People have to assess their context and understand what their current state looks like to figure out what’s the right future state for them”. — Cindy Owyoung, Vice president of inclusion, equity, and belonging at Robinhood


79. “The whole idea of a stereotype is to simplify. Instead of going through the problem of all this great diversity - that it's this or maybe that - you have just one large statement; it is this. ” - Chinua Achebe, Novelist, Poet, Professor and Critic


80. “People may be said to resemble not the bricks of which a house is built, but the pieces of a picture puzzle, each differing in shape, but matching the rest, and thus bringing out the picture. ” —  Felix Adler, Professor of Political and Social Ethics


81. “We run a transparent roadmap process with an open-door policy, encouraging feedback and input from customers and employees. We also proactively solicit input from the team via office hours and open lunches with leadership, including an anonymized Q&A. We believe operating a high-trust environment requires making space for potentially uncomfortable questions, but that’s how the best work gets done. ” — Josh Koenig, Pantheon Systems, Inc


82. “An individual has not started living until he can rise above the narrow confines of his individualistic concerns to the broader concerns of all humanity.” - Martin Luther King, Jr., American Christian Minister and Civil Rights Activist


83. Equality is leaving the door open for anyone who has the means to approach it; equity is ensuring there is a pathway to that door for those who need it. –Caroline Belden, The Inclusion Solution (Equity vs. Equality Series)


84. “If a company had a problem with sales, you wouldn’t hold a deep, sincere conversation about how much everybody values sales, dedicate a ‘National Celebrate Sales Month,’ and expect anything to change. Unfortunately, that’s a lot of what we’ve been doing in the diversity, equity, and inclusion context.”


85. “Unconscious perceptions govern many of the most important decisions we make and have a profound effect on the lives of many people in many ways… Unconscious patterns play out in ways that are so subtle they are hard to spot. ”


86. “The whole idea of a stereotype is to simplify. Instead of going through the problem of all this great diversity - that it's this or maybe that - you have just one large statement; it is this.” - Chinua Achebe, Novelist, Poet, Professor and Critic


87. “The most critical action leaders can take to promote diversity and inclusion over the long term is to model, through their actions, how to honor and respect the dignity of every single person. When a company instills a people-centered culture as the priority, it can leverage the strengths and voices of a diverse set of people in the development of strategies, products, and services. — David Dewolf, 3 Pillar Global


88. “When employees can bring their authentic selves to work, they become better educated about different cultures, experiences and expressions, helping them to build trust as colleagues and provide better care for all their patients,” — Jackie Hunter, UVMHN


89. “We have a very diverse environment and a very inclusive culture, and those characteristics got us through the tough times. Diversity generated a better strategy, better risk management, better debates, and better outcomes. ” — Alan Joyce, Business Executive and Chief Executive Officer of Qantas Airways


90. “Unconscious perceptions govern many of the most important decisions we make and have a profound effect on the lives of many people in many ways.... Unconscious patterns can play out in ways that are so subtle they are hard to spot.” — Howard Ross, Founder of Cook Ross Inc. (Source: CDO Insights)


91. “Our commitment to drive accountability for DEI is embedded in our responsibility to living our values. We initially focused on metrics for culture and representation, but now aligning DEI goals to our business strategy allows us to not only hold executives accountable but ensures that every person in our company plays an active role in advancing diversity, equity, and inclusion. ” — Reginald J. Miller, McDonald’s VP, and Global Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Officer


92. “Often when we talk about diversity, we talk about the things that are a little [easier] to characterize … the observable traits about people. But there's so much more that constitutes our own lived experience. ” — Prakash Janakiraman, co-founder of Nextdoor


93. “The world is intertwined today, much more than it was when I was coming out of school. Because of that, you really need to have a deep understanding of cultures around the world. I have learned to not just appreciate this but celebrate it. The thing that makes the world interesting is our differences, not our similarities.”


94. “Corporate social responsibility is measured in terms of businesses improving conditions for their employees, shareholders, communities, and environment. But moral responsibility goes further, reflecting the need for corporations to address fundamental ethical issues such as inclusion, dignity, and equality.” – Klaus Schwab


95. “It hasn’t been too fashionable to talk about the soul. We live in a material world. Religion is discredited as superstition or, worse, fundamentalism. Spirituality, even when detached from religion, looks a bit hippy, wooly, vague; a comfort-zone for those who can’t quite manage life as a biological and chemical accident with miraculous consequences. ”


96. “There are a number of new fellowships designed to help make the aerospace industry a more diverse and dynamic environment, and the individuals who become alumni of these fellowships are going to change the world. I really want to see space companies and agencies have equal representation of women and minorities.”


97. “It is good we have variation of colors to make this world more colorful and beautiful. We can learn to appreciate the variations within ourselves, then accept and enjoy all the various colorations making me and you, uniquely different and similar, making this globe glows beautifully colorful as intended to be. ”


98. “Everything that you would do to grow a new line of business or drive a business initiative is what it takes to drive DEI at scale. The more companies treat DEI as part of the business, not just something on the side, I think the more they’ll be effective.”


99. “We fundamentally believe that we will make better business decisions if we have diversity in thinking … and that requires equal gender participation.” — Jonas Prising, Chairman and CEO of ManpowerGroup (Source: World Economic Forum)


100. “We need to give each other the space to grow, to be ourselves, to exercise our diversity. We need to give each other space so that we may both give and receive such beautiful things as ideas, openness, dignity, joy, healing, and inclusion. ”


101. “Our commitment to drive accountability for DEI is embedded in our responsibility to living our values. We initially focused on metrics for culture and representation, but now aligning DEI goals to our business strategy allows us to not only hold executives accountable but ensures that every person in our company plays an active role in advancing diversity, equity, and inclusion. ” — Reginald J. Miller, McDonald’s VP, and Global Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Officer


102. “There is a huge business case for diversity. You will be making products for people you don’t understand, you don’t interact with. If you don’t have an inclusive, diverse workforce, it makes you myopic. ” — Renee James, Technology Executive and former President of Intel


103. “Corporate social responsibility is measured in terms of businesses improving conditions for their employees, shareholders, communities, and environment. But moral responsibility goes further, reflecting the need for corporations to address fundamental ethical issues such as inclusion, dignity, and equality. ” – Klaus Schwab


104. “Diversity requires commitment. Achieving the superior performance diversity can produce needs further action – most notably, a commitment to develop a culture of inclusion. People do not just need to be different; they need to be fully involved and feel their voices are heard. ”


105. “There are a lot of unwritten rules in the entertainment industry that create racial exclusion, and at Color Of Change, we know that to change society you have to change the rules. This inclusion rider is a written rule that will change the culture of hiring at the Grammys, and will make inclusion the norm. ” — Rashad Robinson, President at Color of Change


106. “Many conversations about diversity and inclusion do not happen in the boardroom because people are embarrassed at using unfamiliar words or afraid of saying the wrong thing — yet this is the very place we need to be talking about it. The business case speaks for itself — diverse teams are more innovative and successful in going after new markets. ”


107. “Diversity and inclusion are two interconnected concepts—but they are far from interchangeable. Diversity is about representation or the make-up of an entity. Inclusion is about how well the contributions, presence, and perspectives of different groups of people are valued and integrated into an environment. ” — Matt Bush, Culture Coaching Lead at Great Place to Work


108. “We believe our diversity, our differences, when joined together by a common set of ideals, makes us stronger, makes us more creative, makes us different. From all these different strands, we make something new. ” —  Barack Obama, 44th President of the United States of America


109. “As today’s leaders attempt to address diversity and inclusion priorities and challenges, no matter how uncomfortable, they should encourage candid conversations to elicit actionable insights. Senior management, including boards and CEOs, should visibly stand for D&I, as demonstrating commitment is crucial to bringing others on the journey. — Kumar Parakala, GHD


110. “Diversity, or the state of being different, isn't the same as inclusion. One is a description of what is, while the other describes a style of interaction essential to effective teams and organizations. ” — Bill Crawford, Psychologist (Source: Leading Differently)


111. “If you haven’t got the best talent you’re not going to be the best, if you’re not representing properly the available pool of talent then you’re missing an opportunity. ” — Alex Wilmot-Sitwell, EMEA President at Bank of America Merrill Lynch (Sources: Jazz HR Notes and Financial Times)


112. “Action to achieve sociocultural diversity—closely overseen by top management—must be part of a transformation project for the company as a whole. ...The mobilization of the management team and the whole organization must be strong and visible, both to employees and to external stakeholders such as consumers, investors, the media, and the general public.”


113. “The uncomfortable truth is that we actually have not seen enough progress over the last … 40 years. If you look at just the numbers of Black and Latinx executives in senior positions in large firms … it’s nowhere near where it should be. ” — Frank Cooper III, senior managing director and global chief marketing officer at BlackRock


114. “We developed a monthly forum called “Tech Thursday” that is open to everyone within the company to discuss technology and where we should position ourselves as an organization. We are an employee-driven, customer-focused company. We understand that our employees are the engine behind our excellent work. We encourage our employees’ input and participation in these forums because they understand our customers. ” — Calvin Rhodes, IP-Plus Consulting, Inc


115. “Unconscious perceptions govern many of the most important decisions we make and have a profound effect on the lives of many people in many ways. . . . Unconscious patterns can play out in ways that are so subtle they are hard to spot. ” — Howard Ross, Founder of Cook Ross Inc. (Source: CDO Insights)


116. “A lot of [past] decisions have been made on instinct rather than impact measurement and research. There's an opportunity to dig deep into the research and analysis of it all so that we can. . . alter our strategies [and] build best practices. ” — Crystal Barnes, senior vice president of culture and corporate social responsibility for ViacomCBS


117. “If a company had a problem with sales, you wouldn’t hold a deep, sincere conversation about how much everybody values sales, dedicate a ‘National Celebrate Sales Month,’ and expect anything to change. Unfortunately, that’s a lot of what we’ve been doing in the diversity, equity, and inclusion context. ”


118. “Data-informed decision making is so important, specifically when we are talking about DEI. Rather than just aiming for a quick fix to improve your numbers in terms of diversity, data-informed hiring allows for you to evaluate the physical characteristics such as ethnicity and gender, but also characteristics of diversity of thought, education, or experience that have immense value. ” — Kimya Lee, Executive director, strategic workforce planning and analysis at the Department of Homeland Security


119. “Every individual deserves equal access to opportunity regardless of skin color or zip code. For too long, communities of color have faced gross injustices and institutional barriers to their pursuit of the American dream, and we are proud to lend our voices and resources to build new engines of opportunity that empower, inspire, and create meaningful change. ” — Lisa Jackson, Apple’s vice president of environment, policy, and Social Initiatives


120. “There are a number of new fellowships designed to help make the aerospace industry a more diverse and dynamic environment, and the individuals who become alumni of these fellowships are going to change the world. I really want to see space companies and agencies have equal representation of women and minorities. ”


121. “Every individual deserves equal access to opportunity regardless of skin color or zip code. For too long, communities of color have faced gross injustices and institutional barriers to their pursuit of the American dream, and we are proud to lend our voices and resources to build new engines of opportunity that empower, inspire, and create meaningful change. ” —  Lisa Jackson, Apple’s vice president of environment, policy, and Social Initiatives


122. “Embrace diversity of ideas. Embrace the fact that you can disagree with people and not be disagreeable. Embrace the fact that you can find common ground. If you disagree on nine out of 10 things but can find common ground on that 10th, maybe you can make progress. If you can find common ground, you can accomplish great things. ” — David Boies, Lawyer and Chairman of Boies, Schiller, and Flexner


123. “When you're finally up on the moon, looking back at the earth, all these differences and nationalistic traits are pretty well going to blend and you're going to get a concept that maybe this is really one world and why the hell can't we learn to live together like decent people?” — Frank Borman, Retired NASA Astronaut (Source: Wikiquote)


124. “Difference is of the essence of humanity. Difference is an accident of birth and it should therefore never be the source of hatred or conflict. The answer to difference is to respect it. Therein lies a most fundamental principle of peace: respect for diversity. ” – John Hume


125. “While globalization will make the world smaller and more accessible, we must continue to appreciate its vibrant diversity.” - Jean-Philippe Courtois, Executive Vice President and President, Microsoft Global Sales, Marketing and Operations


126. “Inclusion involves creating, fostering, and sustaining practices and conditions that encourage and allow each of us to be full ourselves–with our differences from and similarities to those around us — as we work together” – Jossey-Bass


127. “Data is key to understanding whether D&I strategies are successful, as well as to identify ways to further develop our strategies or to identify areas that require greater focus and investment. ” ​​— Keisha Bell, Managing Director and Head of Diverse Talent Management and Advancement at DTCC


128. “We need women at all levels, including the top, to change the dynamic, reshape the conversation, to make sure women’s voices are heard and heeded, not overlooked and ignored. ” — Sheryl Sandberg, Chief Operating Officer of Facebook


129. “Many conversations about diversity and inclusion do not happen in the boardroom because people are embarrassed at using unfamiliar words or afraid of saying the wrong thing — yet this is the very place we need to be talking about it. The business case speaks for itself — diverse teams are more innovative and successful in going after new markets. ” — Inga Beale, Business Executive and former CEO of Lloyd’s of London


130. “I ask our business development and sales teams to create and test specific hypotheses every week, which we review in detail in a Thursday progress update. Constant awareness and stress-testing of assumptions keep everyone aligned on our core goals and KPIs while encouraging our team to think outside of the box to both meet and challenge those goals. ” —Aidan McCarty, Unum ID


131. “We believe diversity and inclusion are engines of innovation, creativity, progress, and happiness. Uncovering and nurturing the potential of people around the globe is our business.” - Ranjit de Sousa, President, Lee Hecht Harrison


132. “We all want to have something to offer. This is how we belong. It is how we feel included. So, if we want to include everyone, then we have to help everyone develop their talents, and use their gifts for the good of the community. That’s what inclusion means. Everyone is a contributor. ”


133. “One of the best compliments I’ve gotten was that, as a female leader in board meetings or executive meetings, I tend to feel less of a need to fill the room. I step back a bit more and observe the room and see what could be a win–win for everyone. As women leaders, we all need to celebrate the fact that we add quite a bit of inspiration to the room because of the diversity and the energy that we bring.”


134. “The reason diversity quotas or affirmative action initiatives exist is to open a door that might otherwise be shut. But opening that door just enough to let one person through and then letting it shut once more isn’t the progress we need.” 


135. “The diversity in the human family should be the cause of love and harmony, as it is in music where many different notes blend together in the making of a perfect chord.” — ‘Abdu'l-Bahá, Former Head of the Bahá'í Faith (Source: Bahá’í Reference Library)


136. “People may be said to resemble not the bricks of which a house is built, but the pieces of a picture puzzle, each differing in shape, but matching the rest, and thus bringing out the picture. ” - Felix Adler, Professor of Political and Social Ethics


137. “If you haven’t got the best talent you’re not going to be the best, if you’re not representing properly the available pool of talent then you’re missing an opportunity.” — Alex Wilmot-Sitwell, EMEA President at Bank of America Merrill Lynch (Sources: Jazz HR Notes and Financial Times)


138. “We need to give each other the space to grow, to be ourselves, to exercise our diversity. We need to give each other space so that we may both give and receive such beautiful things as ideas, openness, dignity, joy, healing, and inclusion. ” 


139. “Diversity strengthens our innovative capacity, unleashes the potential of Siemens’ employees and thereby directly contributes to our business success.” — Janina Kugel, Human Resources Board Member and Chief Diversity Officer at Siemens (Source: Siemens)


140. “Many conversations about diversity and inclusion do not happen in the boardroom because people are embarrassed at using unfamiliar words or afraid of saying the wrong thing—yet this is the very place we need to be talking about it. The business case speaks for itself—diverse teams are more innovative and successful in going after new markets. ” 


141. “Compassion isn't just about feeling the pain of others; it's about bringing them in toward yourself. If we love what God loves, then, in compassion, margins get erased. Be compassionate as God is compassionate,' means the dismantling of barriers that exclude


142. ” seem to be go-to business buzzwords in today’s work culture, appearing all over company websites and on seemingly every mission statement. But in 2021 and beyond, we want to inspire leaders to achieve more than lip service. 


143. “Employees willingly voice their opinions when they know they are not going to be judged, will not face any negative consequences when they speak up and their voices will be valued. As leaders, we need to nurture a culture celebrating diverse opinions, and that will ensure team members are more engaged in voicing their opinions”. — Vishwas Manral, McAfee


144. “Difference is of the essence of humanity. Difference is an accident of birth and it should therefore never be the source of hatred or conflict. The answer to difference is to respect it. Therein lies a most fundamental principle of peace: respect for diversity.” – John Hume.


145. “We fundamentally believe that we will make better business decisions if we have diversity in thinking … and that requires equal gender participation. ” — Jonas Prising, Chairman and CEO of ManpowerGroup (Source: World Economic Forum)


146. “Feelings of worth can flourish only in an atmosphere where individual differences are appreciated, mistakes are tolerated, communication is open, and rules are flexible – the kind of atmosphere that is found in a nurturing family.” – Virginia Satir


147. “In today’s interconnected and globalized world, it is now commonplace for people of dissimilar world views, faiths and races to live side by side. It is a matter of great urgency, therefore, that we find ways to cooperate with one another in a spirit of mutual acceptance and respect.” – Dalai Lama


148. “We have a very diverse environment and a very inclusive culture and those characteristics got us through the tough times. Diversity generated better strategy, better risk management, better debates, and better outcomes. ” 


149. “Many conversations about diversity and inclusion do not happen in the boardroom because people are embarrassed at using unfamiliar words or afraid of saying the wrong thing—yet this is the very place we need to be talking about it. The business case speaks for itself—diverse teams are more innovative and successful in going after new markets. ”


150. “Often when we talk about diversity, we talk about the things that are a little [easier] to characterize … the observable traits about people. But there's so much more that constitutes our own lived experience.” — Prakash Janakiraman, co-founder of Nextdoor.


151. “If you haven’t hired a team of people who are of color, female, and/or LGBT to actively turn over every stone, to scope out every nook and cranny, to pop out of every bush, to find every qualified underrepresented founder in this country, you’re going to miss out on a lot of money when the rest of the investment world gets it. ”


152. “Diversity and inclusion is less about a program, and more about helping people become comfortable enough to have a dialog about their experiences—including times when we have felt like an outsider. ” - Carin Taylor, Chief Diversity Officer, Workday


153. “There are many ways to improve diversity and inclusion, but one of the most important ways is to measure the inclusivity of team members. We conduct two surveys a year in which we ask each employee to rate their level of inclusion. We use that data to drive change in our hiring and onboarding and in the way we work. ” — Brian Bell, Split Software


154. “Diversity strengthens our innovative capacity, unleashes the potential of Siemens’ employees and thereby directly contributes to our business success. ” — Janina Kugel, Human Resources Board Member and Chief Diversity Officer at Siemens (Source: Siemens)


155. “As today’s leaders attempt to address diversity and inclusion priorities and challenges, no matter how uncomfortable, they should encourage candid conversations to elicit actionable insights. Senior management, including boards and CEOs, should visibly stand for D&I, as demonstrating commitment is crucial to bringing others on the journey. — Kumar Parakala, GHD


156. “Diversity and inclusion are two interconnected concepts—but they are far from interchangeable. Diversity is about representation or the make-up of an entity. Inclusion is about how well the contributions, presence, and perspectives of different groups of people are valued and integrated into an environment. ” — Matt Bush, Culture Coaching Lead at Great Place to Work


157. “A shared vocabulary in the workplace would be so valuable. When I learned terms like ‘cis,’ it helped me think about things and made it easier to talk about issues with my wife. But how do you explain ‘nonbinary’ to a factory-floor mechanic from Georgia? If my colleagues had the right language, it would make conversations a thousand times easier. ”


158. “We need to give each other the space to grow, to be ourselves, to exercise our diversity. We need to give each other space so that we may both give and receive such beautiful things as ideas, openness, dignity, joy, healing, and inclusion. ” — Max De Pree, Business Executive and Writer


159. “The point isn’t to get people to accept that they have biases, but to get them to see [for themselves] that those biases have negative consequences for others. ” — Theresa McHenry, HR Director at Microsoft UK (Source: FT)


160. “Diversity is a given, inclusion is a choice, equity is a goal. Belonging is our ultimate endpoint. When you recognize those three things, you create a culture that is on fire. ” —Camille Chang Gilmore, Boston Scientific’s Global Chief Diversity Officer


161. “There are just some folks that no matter what you say you’re not going to convince them so you need to spend energy on people where you see some promise, you see some glimmers of change, of connection, of nudging them along. ” — Rocio Rivadeneyra, associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at ISU


162. “One of the best compliments I’ve gotten was that, as a female leader in board meetings or executive meetings, I tend to feel less of a need to fill the room. I step back a bit more and observe the room and see what could be a win–win for everyone. As women leaders, we all need to celebrate the fact that we add quite a bit of inspiration to the room because of the diversity and the energy that we bring. ”


163. “With the strong support and advocacy of the C-suite, particularly our CEO, that really motivates us to create this scalable global DE&I platform across the enterprise. [It] permeates the entire management team and leadership team —focus and commitment.” — Joe Simms, chief diversity officer of Stanley BLACK+DECKER. 


164. “There are just some folks that no matter what you say you’re not going to convince them so you need to spend energy on people where you see some promise, you see some glimmers of change, of connection, of nudging them along. ” — Rocio Rivadeneyra, associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at ISU


165. “I really encourage, especially hiring managers and leaders, to name what areas of diversity they want to focus on. If you can’t name it, you’re not going to be able to change it or measure it. Again, we need more hiring managers to move away from the culture fit equation and move toward culture add. ”


166. “Embrace a diversity of ideas. Embrace the fact that you can disagree with people and not be disagreeable. Embrace the fact that you can find common ground - if you disagree on nine out of 10 things, but can find common ground on that 10th, maybe you can make progress. If you can find common ground, you can accomplish great things. ” - David Boies, Lawyer


167. “We need to give each other the space to grow, to be ourselves, to exercise our diversity. We need to give each other space so that we may both give and receive such beautiful things as ideas, openness, dignity, joy, healing, and inclusion.” - Max de Pree, Businessman and Writer


168. “The more accessible we make the opportunities, the more we will hopefully see a payoff in the diversity, equity, and inclusion aspect of hiring. Creating a more level playing field to offer access to these opportunities will bring more people to the government, and once they are in the government, more resources are available to them. ” — Tracy DiMartini, Chief human capital officer at the General Services Administration


169. “Integrating into the work people do every day also helps it become more doable … more feasible. I think those are some of the messages and the ways I’ve seen it (DEI work) resonate with people. ” — Angela Allen, Country Financial Diversity and Inclusion Program Manager


170. ​​“Like any cultural transformation, there’s not a one-and-done formula. There are many levers that need to be pulled” — Mia Mends, Global chief diversity, equity, and inclusion officer and CEO of Impact Ventures at Sodexo North America


171. “The world is intertwined today, much more than it was when I was coming out of school. Because of that, you really need to have a deep understanding of cultures around the world. I have learned to not just appreciate this but celebrate it. The thing that makes the world interesting is our differences, not our similarities. ” 


172. “An inclusive world starts with each of us choosing to respect perspectives other than our own, treating everyone with respect and choosing to stand up for others who need our support. More than anything else, this is what going beyond diversity truly means.” 


173. “We can either emphasize those aspects of our traditions, religious or secular, that speak of hatred, exclusion, and suspicion or work with those that stress the interdependence and equality of all human beings. The choice is yours. (22)”


174. “For me personally, the value that I bring is only evident when I don’t have to pretend or perform. When I can be my true authentic self, I can be the best version of me that I can be. That’s the true value of inclusion. ” — Kim Jenkins, global head of diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging at PayPal


175. “We have a very diverse environment and a very inclusive culture and those characteristics got us through the tough times. Diversity generated a better strategy, better risk management, better debates, and better outcomes. ”


176. “We have a very diverse environment and a very inclusive culture and those characteristics got us through the tough times. Diversity generated better strategy, better risk management, better debates, and better outcomes. ”


177. “The D&I subject isn’t new; 2020 was simply a wake-up call for companies. Advancing workplace diversity is more important today than ever before. I suggest focusing on talent and engaging professionals who can accelerate emerging technologies and solve complex problems. This will help drive diversity in teams and bring broad perspectives together, generating better business results. ” — Azmath Pasha, Paradigm Technology


178. “Many conversations about diversity and inclusion do not happen in the boardroom because people are embarrassed at using unfamiliar words or afraid of saying the wrong thing — yet this is the very place we need to be talking about it. The business case speaks for itself — diverse teams are more innovative and successful in going after new markets.” 


179. “A lot of [past] decisions have been made on instinct rather than impact measurement and research. There's an opportunity to dig deep into the research and analysis of it all so that we can ... alter our strategies [and] build best practices.” — Crystal Barnes, senior vice president of culture and corporate social responsibility for ViacomCBS.


180. “Supporting DEI in the workplace is a business imperative, not just the right thing to do from a societal perspective. He believes that, just like anything that matters in business, companies have to be willing to put money into DEI. If you’re not willing to pay for it, it’s not a real commitment. ” — Paris Wallace, Co-founder of Ovia


181. “At bottom every man knows well enough that he is a unique being, only once on this earth; and by no extraordinary chance will such a marvelously picturesque piece of diversity in unity as he is, ever be put together a second time.” - Friedrich Nietzsche, Philosopher


182. “Embrace a diversity of ideas. Embrace the fact that you can disagree with people and not be disagreeable. Embrace the fact that you can find common ground - if you disagree on nine out of 10 things, but can find common ground on that 10th, maybe you can make progress. If you can find common ground, you can accomplish great things.” - David Boies, Lawyer


183. There are not more than five musical notes, yet the combinations of these five give rise to more melodies than can ever be heard. There are not more than five primary colours, yet in combination they produce more hues than can ever been seen. There are not more than five cardinal tastes, yet combinations of them yield more flavours than can ever be tasted. –Sun Tzu, The Art of War


184. “We developed a monthly forum called “Tech Thursday” that is open to everyone within the company to discuss technology and where we should position ourselves as an organization. We are an employee-driven, customer-focused company. We understand that our employees are the engine behind our excellent work. We encourage our employees’ input and participation in these forums because they understand our customers. ” — Calvin Rhodes, IP-Plus Consulting, Inc


185. “Ensuring diverse team members have a voice in the strategic direction of the company starts with intentionally hiring and developing diverse talent. It continues with promoting awareness of how much better we are as a company when teams of diverse people, perspectives and points of view work together on our most strategic initiatives. ” — Nina Vaca, Pinnacle Group, Inc


186. “Diversity,” “equity,” and “inclusion” seem to be go-to business buzzwords in today’s work culture, appearing all over company websites and on seemingly every mission statement. But in 2021 and beyond, we want to inspire leaders to achieve more than lip service


187. “When I think about everyone else who has to deal with coming out, whether that be in a safe or unsafe environment, I recommend to just think about whether or not it's the right time for you, if the person you're coming out to will make you a better person, and be in the right company. But don't be afraid to do it if it's a safe environment.”


188. “People have to assess their context and understand what their current state looks like to figure out what’s the right future state for them”.  — Cindy Owyoung, Vice president of inclusion, equity, and belonging at Robinhood


189. “We need to give each other the space to grow, to be ourselves, to exercise our diversity. We need to give each other space so that we may both give and receive such beautiful things as ideas, openness, dignity, joy, healing, and inclusion. ” - Max de Pree, Businessman and Writer


190. “We're supposed to be bringing out-of-the-box thinking and innovation, and you cannot do that unless you've got diversity... It's everything from gender to ethnicity to geographic diversity.” - Julie Sweet, CEO of Accenture


191. “Diversity, or the state of being different, isn't the same as inclusion. One is a description of what is, while the other describes a style of interaction essential to effective teams and organizations.” — Bill Crawford, Psychologist (Source: Leading Differently)


192. “If you believe, as we believe, that diversity leads to better products, and we’re all about making products that enrich people’s lives, then you obviously put a ton of energy behind diversity the same way you would put a ton of energy behind anything else that is truly important. ” – Tim Cook


193. “We operate by core values that include “radical candor” (as originated by Kim Scott) as well as our more original value, “Speak up, then commit,” which encourages earnest discussion during the planning phase and then full follow-through after decisions. All our values promote communication, teamwork and mutual trust. We are continuously building a culture of active participation where all voices are heard and respected. ” —Alex Lyashok, WorkFusion


194. “Feelings of worth can flourish only in an atmosphere where individual differences are appreciated, mistakes are tolerated, communication is open, and rules are flexible – the kind of atmosphere that is found in a nurturing family. ” – Virginia Satir


195. “People may be said to resemble not the bricks of which a house is built, but the pieces of a picture puzzle, each differing in shape, but matching the rest, and thus bringing out the picture. ” — Felix Adler, Professor of Political and Social Ethics


196. “Recognizing and respecting differences in others, and treating everyone like you want them to treat you, will help make our world a better place for everyone. Care … be your best. You dont have to be handicapped to be different. Everyone is different!” -Kim Peek


197. “The uncomfortable truth is that we actually have not seen enough progress over the last … 40 years. If you look at just the numbers of Black and Latinx executives in senior positions in large firms … it’s nowhere near where it should be.” — Frank Cooper III, senior managing director and global chief marketing officer at BlackRock.


198. “Diverse teams bring a wealth of perspective that is critical to long-term success. I believe in fostering innovation by embedding it at the cultural level in our core principles. This enables staff at all levels to feel empowered to share their insights. A key part of creating this culture of innovation is to measure diverse ideas through reviews, promotions, raises and rewards. ” — Chuck Canton, Sourcepass Inc


199. “Work-life balance, work-life effectiveness, personal and professional satisfaction—or whatever you choose to call it—is not an entitlement or benefit. Your company cannot give it to you. You have to create it for yourself. ”


200. “We have a very diverse environment and a very inclusive culture and those characteristics got us through the tough times. Diversity generated a better strategy, better risk management, better debates, and better outcomes.” 


201. ​​“Like any cultural transformation, there’s not a one-and-done formula. There are many levers that need to be pulled” — Mia Mends, Global chief diversity, equity, and inclusion officer and CEO of Impact Ventures at Sodexo North America


202. “Our strategic discussions are a joint team exercise that explicitly goes through a phase to identify and gather input from all team members. This ensures we have surveyed the landscape and formed a full picture before narrowing the focus toward execution. We also collaborate with the product development teams and the diversity and inclusion office to create a “diversity by design” process. ” — Arthur Hu, Lenovo


203. “At bottom every man knows well enough that he is a unique being, only once on this earth; and by no extraordinary chance will such a marvelously picturesque piece of diversity in unity as he is, ever be put together a second time. ” - Friedrich Nietzsche, Philosopher


204. “There is a huge business case for diversity. You will be making products for people you don’t understand, you don’t interact with. If you don’t have an inclusive, diverse workforce, it makes you myopic. ” — Renee James, Technology Executive and former President of Intel


205. “Many conversations about diversity and inclusion do not happen in the boardroom because people are embarrassed at using unfamiliar words or afraid of saying the wrong thing—yet this is the very place we need to be talking about it. The business case speaks for itself—diverse teams are more innovative and successful in going after new markets.”


206. “Today when I think about diversity, I actually think about the word ‘inclusion. And I think this is a time of great inclusion. It's not men, it's not women alone. Whether it's geographic, it's approach, it's your style, it's your way of learning, the way you want to contribute, it's your age - it's really broad. ” - Ginni Rometty, Executive Chairman of IBM


207. “The more accessible we make the opportunities, the more we will hopefully see a payoff in the diversity, equity, and inclusion aspect of hiring. Creating a more level playing field to offer access to these opportunities will bring more people to the government, and once they are in the government, more resources are available to them. ” — Tracy DiMartini, Chief human capital officer at the General Services Administration


208. “We all have the ability to promote a culture of acceptance and inclusion — and that is something I believe every leader has a responsibility to do. It starts with having a dialogue until we are all comfortable and no longer have the fear of saying the wrong thing. ” 


209. “No victory, no triumph, no reward, no applause, just oneness, oneness and oneness - that's what the being of oneness is to be drunk with 24 hours of the day – the dream of oneness, the life of oneness, the truth of oneness. ”


210. “Many conversations about diversity and inclusion do not happen in the boardroom because people are embarrassed at using unfamiliar words or afraid of saying the wrong thing — yet this is the very place we need to be talking about it.


211. “Diversity and inclusion cannot simply be delegated to one individual. That is a cop-out. It should be on the CEO’s plate as a priority and central to the HR agenda, not something that ebbs and flows with the quality of a diversity and inclusion leader.”


212. “With the strong support and advocacy of the C-suite, particularly our CEO, that really motivates us to create this scalable global DE&I platform across the enterprise. [It] permeates the entire management team and leadership team —focus and commitment. ” — Joe Simms, chief diversity officer of Stanley BLACK+DECKER


213. “There is a tendency to copy what other people are doing, but you may not have the same problems they have. Take the time to understand your business and what makes sense for you. ” — Fiona MacDonald, Diversity and Inclusion Lead at ANZ


214. “We could learn a lot from crayons: some are sharp, some are pretty, some are dull, while others bright, some have weird names, but they have all learned to live in the same box.” - Robert Fulghum, Author of All I Really Need To Know, I Learned in Kindergarten


215. “There are a lot of unwritten rules in the entertainment industry that create racial exclusion, and at Color Of Change, we know that to change society you have to change the rules. This inclusion rider is a written rule that will change the culture of hiring at the Grammys, and will make inclusion the norm. ” — Rashad Robinson, President at Color of Change


216. “There is a tendency to copy what other people are doing, but you may not have the same problems they have. Take the time to understand your business and what makes sense for you. ” — Fiona MacDonald, Diversity and Inclusion Lead at ANZ


217. “Embrace diversity of ideas. Embrace the fact that you can disagree with people and not be disagreeable. Embrace the fact that you can find common ground. If you disagree on nine out of 10 things but can find common ground on that 10th, maybe you can make progress. If you can find common ground, you can accomplish great things. ” — David Boies, Lawyer and Chairman of Boies, Schiller, and Flexner


218. “The value of a diverse team is its capacity to challenge the norm of groupthink and thus boost organizational performance and improve decision-making. ” — Yrthya Dinsey-Flores, Culture and Operations Chief at Open Society Foundations


219. “The diversity in the human family should be the cause of love and harmony, as it is in music where many different notes blend together in the making of a perfect chord. ” — ‘Abdu'l-Bahá, Former Head of the Bahá'í Faith (Source: Bahá’í Reference Library)


220. “People may be said to resemble not the bricks of which a house is built, but the pieces of a picture puzzle, each differing in shape, but matching the rest, and thus bringing out the picture.” - Felix Adler, Professor of Political and Social Ethics


221. “There are many ways to improve diversity and inclusion, but one of the most important ways is to measure the inclusivity of team members. We conduct two surveys a year in which we ask each employee to rate their level of inclusion. We use that data to drive change in our hiring and onboarding and in the way we work. ” — Brian Bell, Split Software


222. “We need to resist the tyranny of low expectations. We need to open our eyes to the inequality that remains. We won’t unlock the full potential of the workplace until we see how far from equality we really are.” — Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook (Source: Thrive Global)


223. Equality is not a concept. It's not something we should be striving for. It's a necessity. Equality is like gravity. We need it to stand on this earth as men and women, and the misogyny that is in every culture is not a true part of the human condition. It is life out of balance, and that imbalance is sucking something out of the soul of every man and woman who's confronted with it. We need equality. Kinda now. –Joss Whedon


224. “Ensuring diverse team members have a voice in the strategic direction of the company starts with intentionally hiring and developing diverse talent. It continues with promoting awareness of how much better we are as a company when teams of diverse people, perspectives and points of view work together on our most strategic initiatives. ”  — Nina Vaca, Pinnacle Group, Inc


225. “Our workforce and our entire economy are strongest when we embrace diversity to its fullest, and that means opening doors of opportunity to everyone. ” —  Tom Perez, Politician, Attorney and Chair of the DNC (Democratic National Committee)


226. “The world is intertwined today, much more than it was when I was coming out of school. Because of that, you really need to have a deep understanding of cultures around the world. I have learned to not just appreciate this but celebrate it. The thing that makes the world interesting is our differences, not our similarities. ”


227. “We have a very diverse environment and a very inclusive culture, and those characteristics got us through the tough times. Diversity generated a better strategy, better risk management, better debates, and better outcomes. ” — Alan Joyce, Business Executive and Chief Executive Officer of Qantas Airways


228. “Diversity is a fact, but inclusion is a choice we make every day. As leaders, we have to put out the message that we embrace, and not just tolerate, diversity. ” — Nellie Borrero, Global Inclusion and Diversity Managing Director at Accenture


229. “Employees willingly voice their opinions when they know they are not going to be judged, will not face any negative consequences when they speak up and their voices will be valued. As leaders, we need to nurture a culture celebrating diverse opinions, and that will ensure team members are more engaged in voicing their opinions”. — Vishwas Manral, McAfee

19 views0 comments
bottom of page