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200 Best Confrontation Quotes: Face Your Fears (2023)

1. For your calling to be fulfilled your issues must be confronted. - Steven Furtick


2. “To confront a person with his shadow is to show him his own light.” — Carl Jung


3. Sobriety forces you to confront whatever your alcoholism was hiding.


4. “Each person deserves a day away in which no problems are confronted, no solutions searched for.”


5. “Whenever you are confronted with an opponent, conquer him with love.”


6. “I have a very hard time with confrontation in my own life, and I end up being way too nice.”- Missi Pyle


7. By confronting our envy, we learn what drives us. By accepting our anxiety, we can reframe it as excitement and become more successful.


8. Silence forces a man to confront himself.


9. “There are always new, grander challenges to confront, and a true winner will embrace each one.” – Mia Hamm


10. One of the most basic principles for making and keeping peace within and between nations…is that in political, military, moral, and spiritual confrontations, there should be an honest attempt at the reconciliation of differences before resorting to combat.


11. “In the confrontation between the stream and the rock, the stream always


12. “A key psychology for leading from good to great is the Stockdale Paradox: Retain absolute faith that you can and will prevail in the end, regardless of the difficulties, AND at the same time confront the most brutal facts of your current reality, whatever they might be. UNEXPECTED.”


13. “Choosing to be respectful in conflict resolution will guide a person’s words and actions during a confrontation. When you respect the other person, you make the effort to be calm and non-adversarial in your speech and conduct.” – John Ward


14. “The truth is, the only thing more painful than confronting an uncomfortable topic is pretending it doesn’t exist. And I believe far more suffering is caused by failing to deal with an issue directly—and whispering about it in the hallways—than by putting it on the table and wrestling with it head on.”


15. “Todo radica en cómo confrontamos las pérdidas, porque la gran diferencia en la vida de las personas tiene que ver con la manera en que cada quien lidia con el fracaso.”


16. “You absolutely cannot make a series of good decisions without first confronting the brutal facts.”


17. “Standing up for yourself doesn’t always involve verbal confrontation. Sometimes it’s about not wasting energy on people who are negative.” ​


18. “You might object, “Well, I just could not manage to take on something that important.” What if you began to build yourself into a person who could? You could start by trying to solve a small problem—something that is bothering you, that you think you could fix. You could start by confronting a dragon of just the size that you are likely to defeat. A tiny serpent might not have had the time to hoard a lot of gold, but there might still be some treasure to be won, along with a reasonable probability of succeeding in such a quest (and not too much chance of a fiery or toothsome death).”


19. “to confront external dangers because they fear no danger from each other. They operate in a strong Circle of Safety.”


20. “Your objective is to avoid being on a string. The first step, I think, is to get over the fear of losing a man by confronting him. Just stop being afraid, already. The most successful people in this world recognize that taking chances to get what they want is much more productive than sitting around being too scared to take a shot. The same philosophy can be applied to dating: if putting your requirements on the table means you risk him walking away, it’s a risk you have to take. Because that fear can trip you up every time; all too many of you let the guy get away with disrespecting you, putting in minimal effort and holding on to the commitment to you because you’re afraid he’s going to walk away and you’ll be alone again. And we men? We recognize this and play on it, big time.”


21. All of the great leaders have had one characteristic in common: it was the willingness to confront unequivocally the major anxiety of their people in their time. This, and not much else, is the essence of leadership.


22. “When you explore boldly, when you voluntarily confront the unknown, you gather information and build your renewed self out of that information.”


23. “That’s why Jesus could say about Peter, “I tell you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not overcome it,” only to directly correct and confront Peter just verses later: “Get behind me, Satan! You are a stumbling block to me; you do not have in mind the concerns of God, but merely human concerns” (Matthew 16:18, 23)”


24. Leadership is lonely. I'm not going to be afraid of confrontation to get us to where we need to go.


25. “All of the great leaders have had one characteristic in common: it was the willingness to confront unequivocally the major anxiety of their people in their time. This, and not much else, is the essence of leadership.” — John Kenneth Galbraith


26. When you explore boldly, when you voluntarily confront


27. “I want to keep the peace. I want to be gentle, not confrontational.”


28. “Talking about a colleague who is not present is not gossip. Gossip requires the intent to hurt someone, and it is almost always accompanied by an unwillingness to confront a person directly with the information being discussed.”


29. “The Gorbachev Doctrine represented a shift of policy and performance, disengaging by choice from a whole global confrontation with the United States, to a policy predicated on cooperative security and normalised relations with other countries.”


30. “Aggressive confrontation is the enemy of constructive negotiation.”


31. He can run faster than Severus Snape confronted with shampoo.


32. “In the confrontation between the stream and the rock. the stream always wins. not through strength. but through persistence.”


33. “I will never surrender to discouragement or despair no matter what seeming obstacles may confront me.”


34. “try to force your opponent to admit that you are right. Aggressive confrontation is the enemy of constructive negotiation. ■ Avoid questions that can be answered with “Yes” or tiny pieces of information. These require little thought and inspire the human need for reciprocity; you will be expected to give something back. ■ Ask calibrated questions that start with the words “How” or “What.” By implicitly asking the other party for help, these questions will give your counterpart an illusion of control and will inspire them to speak at length, revealing important information. ■ Don’t ask questions that start with “Why” unless you want your counterpart to defend a goal that serves you. “Why” is always an accusation, in any language. ■ Calibrate your questions to point your counterpart toward solving your problem. This will encourage them to expend their energy on devising a solution. ■ Bite your tongue. When you’re attacked in a negotiation, pause and avoid angry emotional reactions. Instead, ask your counterpart a calibrated question. ■ There is always a team on the other side. If you are not influencing those behind the table, you are vulnerable.”


35. “Is the burden of independent thought wearing you down? Do you dread the indecision that awaits every time you open your wardrobe? Are you embarrassed by your reticence when you hear other people discuss current affairs, music, relationships, etcetera? Don't worry, you're not alone. Help is just a pair of clippers away! We've helped thousands of sad losers avoid confronting their loneliness and inadequacy, and we can do the same for you. We'll tell you what to wear. We'll tell you what to think. We'll tell you what music to listen to. and most importantly, we'll bring you together with lots of people exactly the same as yourself — it's just like having friends!”


36. “Once you find that idea, start moving forward and act decisively. U.S. admiral William Halsey observed, “All problems become smaller if you don’t dodge them, but confront them. Touch a thistle timidly, and it pricks you; grasp it boldly, and its spines crumble.”


37. "You will find peace not by trying to escape your problems, but by confronting them courageously. You will find peace not in denial, but in victory.” — J. Donald Walters


38. “You will find peace not by trying to escape your problems, but by confronting them courageously. You will find peace not in denial, but in victory.” ~ J. Donald Walters


39. “Like the softening words and phrases “perhaps,” “maybe,” “I think,” and “it seems,” the calibrated open-ended question takes the aggression out of a confrontational statement or close-ended request that might otherwise anger your counterpart.”


40. “Hope confronts. It does not ignore pain, agony, or injustice. It is not a saccharine optimism that refuses to see, face, or grapple with the wretchedness of reality. You can't have hope without despair, because hope is a response. Hope is the active conviction that despair will never have the last word.”


41. “The goal of confrontation should be to help, not to humiliate.”


42. “A fresh approach is needed — an analysis of our human situation from a basis that recognises and confronts the psychological dimension to our behaviour.” ― Jeremy Griffith


43. “All of the great leaders have had one characteristic in common: It was the willingness to confront unequivocally the major anxiety of their people in their time. This, and not much else, is the essence of leadership.” —John Kenneth Galbraith, economist and diplomat


44. “Cooperation means win-win, confrontation means lose-lose.”


45. It's a lose-lose situation to get in a confrontation on the street. If you can break contact and get away, break contact and get away. That's what you should learn self-defense for.


46. “As I confronted her, the changes grew less apparent to me, her identity stronger. She was there, in the full vigor of her personality, battered but not diminished, looking at me, speaking to me in the husky, breathy voice I remembered so well.”


47. (Whatever that may mean.) But in a way, it’s also an age where you are confronted with responsibilities and also that of self-care. Moving out, becoming that more independent you.


48. “If you get word that a co-worker is saying things about you behind your back, confront him or her on it. If an evaluation of your work is false and biased, challenge it. Doing nothing will only worsen the damage. Understand that you can’t control everything, so pick your spots and stand up for what you know and believe is right. Communicate when there is a miscommunication.”


49. You will find peace not by trying to escape your problems, but by confronting them courageously. You will find peace not in denial, but in victory.


50. “A detachment of police confronted this army of earnest schoolchildren and without warning opened fire, killing thirteen-year-old Hector Pieterson and many others. The children fought with sticks and stones, and mass chaos ensued, with hundreds of children wounded, and two white men stoned to death”


51. “When an executive decides not to confront a peer about a potential disagreement, he or she is dooming employees to waste time, money, and emotional energy dealing with unresolvable issues. This causes the best employees to start looking for jobs in less dysfunctional organizations, and it creates an environment of disillusionment, distrust, and exhaustion for those who stay.”


52. “This three-part recipe—a (1) clear insight (2) compressed in time and (3) discovered by the audience itself—provides a blueprint for us when we want people to confront uncomfortable truths.”


53. “I got out of the elevator and confronted Mr. Wexler. “Killing is wrong.”


54. “When confronted with a challenge, the committed heart will search for a solution. The undecided heart searches for an escape.” — Andy Andrews


55. “A key psychology for leading from good to great is the Stockdale Paradox: Retain absolute faith that you can and will prevail in the end, regardless of the difficulties, AND at the same time confront the most brutal facts of your current reality, whatever they might be. UNEXPECTED”


56. Take the high road. No matter how much strife, and consternation, frustration and anger you might be confronted with — don’t go to that level. —Tim Gunn


57. “When confronted with naming your terms or price, counter by recalling a similar deal which establishes your “ballpark,” albeit the best possible ballpark you wish to be in. Instead of saying, “I’m worth $110,000,” Jerry might have said, “At top places like X Corp., people in this job get between $130,000 and $170,000.” That gets your point across without moving the other party into a defensive position. And it gets him thinking at higher levels. Research shows that people who hear extreme anchors unconsciously adjust their expectations in the direction of the opening number.”


58. “In the confrontation between the stream and the rock, the stream always wins, not through strength, but through persistence.”


59. “You must maintain unwavering faith that you can and will prevail in the end, regardless of the difficulties, AND at the same time, have the discipline to confront the most brutal facts of your current reality, whatever they might be.”


60. “But what we can do is start being kind to ourselves when confronting our limitations, and we can suffer less because of them.” – Kristin Neff


61. When confronted with a challenge, the committed heart will search for a solution. The undecided heart searches for an escape.” — Andy Andrews


62. “Feeling confronted with the absurdity of life may sometimes nurture a personal satisfaction for those who like to set a paramount task or to create a compassionate mission. In so doing, the seal of absurdity becomes less unbearable, while it confers them a ‘Sisyphus’ status that transmutes them into heroes of human resilience. (“Sisyphus on the hill.)”


63. “If you get word that a co-worker is saying things about you behind your back, confront him or her about it. If an evaluation of your work is false and biased, challenge it. Doing nothing will only worsen the damage.”


64. “If you will not reveal yourself to others, you cannot reveal yourself to yourself. That does not only mean that you suppress who you are, although it also means that. It means that so much of what you could be will never be forced by necessity to come forward. This is a biological truth, as well as a conceptual truth. When you explore boldly, when you voluntarily confront the unknown, you gather information and build your renewed self out of that information. That is the conceptual element. However, researchers have recently discovered that new genes in the central nervous system turn themselves on when an organism is placed (or places itself) in a new situation. These genes code for new proteins. These proteins are the building blocks for new structures in the brain. This means that a lot of you is still nascent, in the most physical of senses, and will not be called forth by stasis. You have to say something, go somewhere and do things to get turned on.”


65. “You absolutely cannot make a series of good decisions without first confronting the brutal facts. The good-to-great companies operated in accordance with this principle, and the comparison companies generally did not.”


66. “The light that you discover in your life is proportionate to the amount of the darkness you are willing to forthrightly confront (from the debate between Jordan Peterson and Slavoj Zizek)”


67. “If we can keep that flexibility of mind, that hospitality toward new ideas, we will be able to welcome the new flow of thought from wherever it comes, not resisting it; weighing and evaluating and exploring the strange new concepts that confront us at every turn. We cannot shut the windows and pull down the shades; we cannot say, “I have learned all I need to know; my opinions are fixed on everything. I refuse to change or to consider these new things.” Not today. Not any more.”


68. "The universe is made up of experiences that are designed to burn out your attachment, your clinging, to pleasure, to pain, to fear to all of it. And as long as there is a place where your vulnerable, the universe will find a way to confront you with it.”


69. “the key to getting people to see things your way is not to confront them on their ideas (“You can’t leave”) but to acknowledge their ideas openly (“I understand why you’re pissed off”) and then guide them toward solving the problem (“What do you hope to accomplish by leaving?”).”


70. “If you have not confronted true horrors, understood evil, suffered hopelessness and despair, found faith, and made yourself completely accountable for your own choices, actions and outcomes, then I can guarantee that any acceptance you pretend to have will be as brittle and temporary as a snowball in the middle of summer.”


71. “With myself, I have to hold the line. There are areas within myself where I CANNOT compromise. I am going to work hard. I am going to train hard. I am going to improve myself. I am not going to rest on my laurels. I am going to own my mistakes and confront them. I am going to face my demons. I’m not going to give up, or give out, or give in. I’m going to stand. I am going to maintain my self-discipline. And on those points there will be No Compromise. NOT NOW. NOT EVER.”


72. “When a child who can write is confronted with a word which he has to read and interpret, he is silent for some time and usually reads the component sounds as slowly as if he were writing them. The sense of the word, on the other hand, is grasped when it is pronounced rapidly and with the necessary intonation. Now, in order to inflect it properly, a child must recognise the word, that is, the idea which it represents. A higher intellectual activity must therefore be brought into play. ”


73. “Even those who are closest to you and most in love with you, the people you love most in the world will find clarity confronting at times.”


74. “It’s a lose-lose situation to get in a confrontation on the street. If you can break contact and get away, break contact and get away. That’s what you should learn self-defense for.”~Jocko Willink


75. “In my view, success is earned externally by being better than other people. But character, that sort of unfakeable goodness, is earned by being better than you used to be. And it’s about self-confrontation. ” — David Brooks


76. “Each person deserves a day away in which no problems are confronted, no solution searched for. Each of us needs to withdraw from cares which will not withdraw from us.” – Maya Angelou


77. All of the great leaders have had one characteristic in common: it was the willingness to confront unequivocally the major anxiety of their people in their time. This, and not much else, is the essence of leadership. — John Kenneth Galbraith


78. “The key to getting people to see things your way is not to confront them on their ideas ('You can’t leave') but to acknowledge their ideas openly ('I understand why you’re pissed off') and then guide them toward solving the problem ('What do you hope to accomplish by leaving?').”


79. “Don’t try to force your opponent to admit that you are right. Aggressive confrontation is the enemy of constructive negotiation.”


80. “That’s because whenever we are too close to someone or something, we take our beliefs for granted, instead of questioning them as we do when we confront something more remote. The more familiar a stock is, the more likely it is to turn a defensive investor into a lazy one who thinks there’s no need to do any homework. Don’t let that happen to you.”


81. We have to confront ourselves. Do we like what we see in the mirror? And, according to our light, according to our understanding, according to our courage, we will have to say yea or nay – and rise!


82. “Using the first-person singular pronoun is another great way to set a boundary without escalating into confrontation.”


83. “The only way he knew how to conquer the demon, was by confronting it.”


84. This quote highlights the inner strength that addicts and alcoholics working to heal from addiction possess. Recovery requires a person to take a deep look inside and confront their darkest fears. Recovering addicts learn to recognize personal weaknesses, rebuild damaged relationships, develop communication skills, ask for forgiveness, build trust and take accountability for their actions. Many people will never understand the daily work one must do in recovery.


85. “Before we move on to the stuffer who collects retaliation rocks, I want to address the issue of impossible people. We know that all things are possible with God. But all things are not possible with people who refuse to be led by the Holy Spirit. I’ve had to get really honest about certain people in my life. It isn’t productive or possible to confront them and expect anything good to come from it. If someone has told me over and over through their actions and reactions that they will make my life miserable if I confront them, at some point I have to back away. But I don’t want to stuff and allow bitterness toward them to poison me. So, how do I back away and not stuff? I acknowledge that I can control only myself. I can’t control how another person acts or reacts. Therefore, I shift my focus from trying to fix the other person and the situation to allowing God to reveal some tender truths to me. I typically pray something like this: God, I’m so tired of being hurt. I’m so tired of feeling distracted and discouraged by this situation. Pour Your lavish mercy on my heart and into this hard relationship. Help me to see the obvious hurt they must have in their life that makes them act this way. Help me to have compassion for their pain. Help me to see anything I’m doing or have done that has negatively affected this situation. And please help me to know how to separate myself graciously from this constant source of hurt in my life. It all feels impossible. Oh God, speak to me. Reveal clearly how I can best honor You, even in this. My job isn’t to fix the difficult people in my life or enable them to continue disrespectful or abusive behaviors. My job is to be obedient to God in the way I act and respond to those people.”


86. “It didn’t matter how bleak the situation or how stultifying their mediocrity, they all maintained unwavering faith that they would not just survive, but prevail as a great company. And yet, at the same time, they became relentlessly disciplined at confronting the most brutal facts of their current reality.”


87. “Conflicts will arise one way or another and when conflicts are not confronted, it does not resolve itself. The emotions you feel might temporarily fade away but since the issue has never been resolved, it comes back up. It only takes another trigger and you are back to those feelings again.” – John Ward


88. “What I mean is this: When confronted with naming your terms or price, counter by recalling a similar deal which establishes your “ballpark,” albeit the best possible ballpark you wish to be in. Instead of saying, “I’m worth $110,000,” Jerry might have said, “At top places like X Corp., people in this job get between $130,000 and $170,000.” That gets your point across without moving the other party into a defensive position. And it gets him thinking at higher levels.”


89. “What worries me the most is that most men are so weak. Because of that they act like they don’t care and like machos – because they are too fragile inside. They’re scared of confrontation and afraid of so many things.” ~ Salma Hayek


90. Equality is not a concept. It's not something we should be striving for. It's a necessity. Equality is like gravity. We need it to stand on this earth as men and women, and the misogyny that is in every culture is not a true part of the human condition. It is life out of balance, and that imbalance is sucking something out of the soul of every man and woman who's confronted with it. We need equality. Kinda now. –Joss Whedon


91. “If you’re not a hero-making, you may not pay professionally. You may pay personally… Your children will become confronted with your fear. And your children will know you are strange.”


92. “The only way he knew how to conquer the demon, was by confronting it.” ― Shad’e Zuiweta


93. “You absolutely cannot make a series of good decisions without first confronting the brutal facts. The good-to-great companies operated” ― James C. Collins, Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap... and Others Don't


94. “The child should love everything that he learns, for his mental and emotional growths are linked. Whatever is presented to him must be made beautiful and clear, striking his imagination. Once this love has been kindled, all problems confronting the educationalist will disappear. ”


95. “When confronted with a challenge, the committed heart will search for a solution. The undecided heart searches for an escape.” – Andy Andrews


96. “We are confronted with a considerable development of consciousness that has already taken place, but now that consciousness is thrown outwards with a special direction, intelligence being extroverted, and there is an unusual demand on the part of the child to know the reasons for things. ”


97. “If you get word that a co-worker is saying things about you behind your back, confront him or her on it. If an evaluation of your work is false and biased, challenge it. Doing nothing will only worsen the damage. Understand that you can’t control everything, so pick your spots and stand up for what you know and believe is right. Communicate when there is a miscommunication.” ― Nick Saban


98. “We must turn all of our educational efforts to training our children for the choices which will confront them… The child who is to choose wisely must be healthy in mind and body. The children must be taught how to think, not what to think.” Margaret Mead


99. “Whenever you are confronted with an opponent, conquer him with love.”


100. “Level 5 leaders confront the brutal facts before they set vision and strategy, and they create a climate where the truth is heard. Failure to confront the brutal facts is a precursor to catastrophic decline, always.”


101. “When confronted with a challenge, the committed heart will search for a solution. The undecided heart searches for an escape. ” —Andy Andrews, author and speaker


102. “All of the great leaders have had one characteristic in common: it was the willingness to confront unequivocally the major anxiety of their people in their time. This, and not much else, is the essence of leadership.” – John Kenneth Galbraith, economist and diplomat


103. “If you’re honest. you sooner or later have to confront your values. Then you’re forced to separate what is right from what is merely legal.”


104. “A media diet of hostility, blame, confrontation and violence corrodes your civic outlook.”


105. “Churches are notorious for creating competing systems, wherein unclear direction and conflicting information threaten to cause a breakdown and paralyze the ministry. Instead of replacing old systems, we tend to just download and add whatever is new to what already exists. Soon our capacity becomes fragmented and we find ourselves confronted with the signs of ineffectiveness: some ministries seem routine and irrelevant; the teaching feels too academic; calendars are saturated with mediocre programs; staff members pull in opposite directions; volunteers lack motivation; departments viciously compete for resources; and it becomes harder and harder to figure out if we are really being successful. Too many churches desperately need an upgrade. They need to reformat their hard drives and install a clean system. They need to rewrite their code so everyone is clear about what is important and how they should function.”


106. “Serpentining" means trying to control a situation, backing out of it, pretending it's not happening, or maybe even pretending that you don't care. We use it to dodge conflict, discomfort, possible confrontation, the potential for shame or hurt, and/or criticism (self- or other-inflicted). Serpentining can lead to hiding out, pretending, avoidance, procrastination, rationalizing, blaming, and lying.


107. “One of the most basic principles for making and keeping peace within and between nations. . . is that in political, military, moral, and spiritual confrontations, there should be an honest attempt at the reconciliation of differences before resorting to combat”


108. “The root cause of all passive aggression is the human fear of direct confrontation—the emotions that a conflict can churn up and the loss of control that ensues.”


109. “However, the risk of paying too high a price for good-quality stocks—while a real one—is not the chief hazard confronting the average buyer of securities. Observation over many years has taught us that the chief losses to investors come from the purchase of low-quality securities at times of favorable business conditions. The purchasers view the current good earnings as equivalent to “earning power” and assume that prosperity is synonymous with safety.”


110. “certain: You absolutely cannot make a series of good decisions without first confronting the brutal facts. The good-to-great companies operated”


111. “Sometimes the best thing we can ask for is change, and a fresh start forces us to confront change head-on.” — Natalya Neidhart


112. “Every person needs to take one day away. A day in which one consciously separates the past from the future. Jobs, family, employers, and friends can exist one day without any one of us, and if our egos permit us to confess, they could exist eternally in our absence. Each person deserves a day away in which no problems are confronted, no solutions searched for. Each of us needs to withdraw from the cares which will not withdraw from us.”


113. “But it is the grace of the Gospel, which is so hard for the pious to understand, that it confronts us with the truth and says: You are a sinner, a great, desperate sinner; now come, as the sinner that you are, to God who loves you. He wants you as you are; He does not want anything from you, a sacrifice, a work; He wants you alone.”


114. “But what we can do is start being kind to ourselves when confronting our limitations, and we can suffer less because of them.” ― Kristin Neff


115. I find you mature prepared to confront life, the pride I feel in being your mom is something which can’t be described. I invite the life this day you observe an additional year.


116. “We avoid the things that we’re afraid of because we think there will be dire consequences if we confront them. But the truly dire consequences in our lives come from avoiding things that we need to learn about or discover.” –Shakti Gawain


117. “Whenever smart and well-intentioned people avoid confronting obstacles, they disempower employees and undermine change.”


118. “This feeling of belonging, of shared values and a deep sense of empathy, dramatically enhances trust, cooperation and problem solving. United States Marines are better equipped to confront external dangers because they fear no danger from each other. They operate in a strong Circle of Safety.”


119. “All of the great leaders have had one characteristic in common: it was the willingness to confront unequivocally the major anxiety of their people in their time. This, and not much else, is the essence of leadership.”~ John Kenneth Galbraith


120. “Take the high road. No matter how much strife, and consternation, frustration, and anger you might be confronted with – don’t go to that level.” — Tim Gunn


121. “You’re much better off to confront your fears head on than you are to wait and let them find you.”


122. “The next decade cannot be a decade of confrontation and contention. It cannot be East vs. West. It cannot be men vs. women. It cannot be Islam vs. Christianity. That is what the enemies of dialogue want.” – Benazir Bhutto


123. “We are now faced with the fact that tomorrow is today. We are confronted with the fierce urgency of now. In this unfolding conundrum of life and history, there ‘is’ such a thing as being too late. This is no time for apathy or complacency. This is a time for vigorous and positive action.”


124. “My message to you all is of hope, courage, and confidence. Let us mobilize all our resources in a systematic and organized way and tackle the grave issues that confront us with grim determination and discipline worthy of a great nation.” Muhammad Ali Jinnah


125. “Don’t try to force your opponent to admit that you are right. Aggressive confrontation is the enemy of constructive negotiation. ■​Avoid questions that can be answered with “Yes” or tiny pieces of information. These require little thought and inspire the human need for reciprocity; you will be expected to give something back. ■​Ask calibrated questions that start with the words “How” or “What.” By implicitly asking the other party for help, these questions will give your counterpart an illusion of control and will inspire them to speak at length, revealing important information. ■​Don’t ask questions that start with “Why” unless you want your counterpart to defend a goal that serves you. “Why” is always an accusation, in any language. ■​Calibrate your questions to point your counterpart toward solving your problem. This will encourage them to expend their energy on devising a solution. ■​Bite your tongue. When you’re attacked in a negotiation, pause and avoid angry emotional reactions. Instead, ask your counterpart a calibrated question. ■​There is always a team on the other side. If you are not influencing those behind the table, you are vulnerable.”


126. All of the great leaders have had one characteristic in common: It was the willingness to confront unequivocally the major anxiety of their people in their time. This, and not much else, is the essence of leadership. —John Kenneth Galbraith, economist and diplomat


127. “It takes an enormous amount of internal security to begin with the spirit of adventure, the spirit of discovery, the spirit of creativity. Without doubt, you have to leave the comfort zone of base camp and confront an entirely new and unknown wilderness. You become a trailblazer, a pathfinder. You open new possibilities, new territories, new continents, so that others can follow.”


128. “You must maintain unwavering faith that you can and will prevail in the end, regardless of the difficulties, AND at the same time, have the discipline to confront the most brutal facts of your current reality, whatever they might be.” — James C. Collins


129. “Tomorrow is today. We are confronted with the fierce urgency of now. In this unfolding conundrum of life and history, there is such a thing as being too late. This is no time for apathy or complacency. This is a time for vigorous and positive action.”


130. “Our successes and failures in life can be traced to how well or how badly we deal with the inevitable conflicts that confront us in society.”


131. A Narcissist will never admit they have a problem. If confronted with their own bad behavior, they will do their very best to make people believe they are the victim.” ― Harvey Stuarts


132. “Somewhere in this process you will come face-to-face with the sudden and shocking realization that you are completely crazy. Your mind is a shrieking gibbering madhouse on wheels barreling pell-mell down the hill utterly out of control and hopeless. No problem. You are not crazier than you were yesterday. It has always been this way and you just never noticed. You are also no crazier than everybody else around you. The only real difference is that you have confronted the situation they have not.”


133. “The basic confrontation which seemed to be colonialism versus anti-colonialism, indeed capitalism versus socialism, is already losing its importance.”


134. “You must never confuse faith that you will prevail in the end—which you can never afford to lose—with the discipline to confront the most brutal facts of your current reality, whatever they might be.”


135. “He can run faster than Severus Snape confronted with shampoo.” — Fred Weasley


136. When you encounter obstacles, don't turn your back on them. Face them, confront them and you will see them dissolving in front of your eyes.


137. “Certainly it is a new task that confronts us, to study and take into account the needs of this absorbent mind. It is to respond to these needs that we say, ‘Education must begin at birth’. We must provide the child’s psychic powers with the nourishment they require. ”


138. “remember not every face-to-face confrontation needs a verbal response”


139. “I've decided to confront it. Confront whatever life throws at me, as I always have. However much I can feel, nothing more, nothing less.”


140. “All of the great leaders have had one characteristic in common: it was the willingness to confront unequivocally the major anxiety of their people in their time. This, and not much else, is the essence of leadership.” –John Kenneth Galbraith


141. “Trust yourself to be able to confront and work through your emotions. If you believe you can’t do it, you won’t do it and you’ll become stuck. If you believe you can do it, you will.” ― Sam Owen


142. “At work or at home, conflict is a part of life. How do we respond? Sometimes we suppress it by avoiding people, leaving jobs or ending relationships. When that isn’t an option, we may nurse grudges until we can’t stand it anymore, at which time we may explode and engage in fruitless and even embarrassing confrontations. Unresolved conflict takes its toll on us and on our relationships. We can all learn to resolve it better.” – Robert I. Sutton


143. The fact that pastors are some of the most wonderful people on the planet cannot be overruled. They give themselves sacrificially, nearly not asking anything in return. They direct us towards God. They pray with us in our times of need. Pastors counsel us through life’s challenges and help us to confront our fears. We look up to them and try to model their life.


144. Take the high road. No matter how much strife, and consternation, frustration and anger you might be confronted with - don't go to that level. - Author: Tim Gunn


145. “Emotional intelligence does not mean merely "being nice". At strategic moment it may demand not "being nice", but rather, for example, bluntly confronting someone with an uncomfortable but consequential truth they've been avoiding.”


146. “the difficulties, AND at the same time have the discipline to confront the most brutal facts of your current reality, whatever they might be.”


147. “I for one believe that if you give people a thorough understanding of what confronts them and the basic causes that produce it, they’ll create their own program, and when the people create a program, you get action.” — Malcolm X


148. “KEY POINTS—EMBRACING ACCOUNTABILITY • Accountability on a strong team occurs directly among peers. • For a culture of accountability to thrive, a leader must demonstrate a willingness to confront difficult issues. • The best opportunity for holding one another accountable occurs during meetings, and the regular review of a team scoreboard provides a clear context for doing so.”


149. “Indeed, the big point of this chapter is not about technology per se. No technology, no matter how amazing—not computers, not telecommunications, not robotics, not the Internet—can by itself ignite a shift from good to great. No technology can make you Level 5. No technology can turn the wrong people into the right people. No technology can instill the discipline to confront brutal facts of reality, nor can it instill unwavering faith.”


150. “When you encounter obstacles, don’t turn your back on them. Face them, confront them, and you will see them dissolving in front of your eyes.” – Dr. Roopleen


151. Giving up drugs and alcohol is one of the most difficult things a person can do when they are physically and emotionally dependent on substances. However, recovery is about much more than just getting clean and sober. In recovery, participants work to develop personal capacities, build life skills and confront challenges head on. Each day in recovery, one’s commitment and capacities are tested. Participants in recovery programs learn to break large goals down into small, achievable actions; to focus on change they can affect; to recognize when they need support and to ask for help when necessary. Inner strength accessed during this process serves a person in all facets of life. The persistence, commitment and resilience practiced in recovery can be applied to achieve one’s personal, educational and professional goals.


152. “When confronted with a challenge. the committed heart will search for a solution. The undecided heart searches for an escape.” —Andy Andrews


153. Honesty is the best policy; the only way out is deeper in a candid confrontation with existence is dizzying, liberating. – David Shields


154. “When confronted with the enormity of operational plans and the intricate microterrain within those plans, it becomes easy to get lost in the details, to become sidetracked or lose focus on the bigger effort. It is crucial, particularly for leaders at the top of the organization, to “pull themselves off the firing line,” step back, and maintain the strategic picture. This is essential to help correctly prioritize for the team. With this perspective, it becomes far easier to determine the highest priority effort and focus all energies toward its execution. Then senior leaders must help subordinate team leaders within their team prioritize their efforts.”


155. “Every team needs either a confrontational star player or coach. In San Antonio, Gregg Popovich was that guy and Tim Duncan was not. In Golden State, Draymond Green is the confrontational one; Steve Kerr is not. For us, Phil was not that type of person, so I provided that force. You always have to have that balance and counterbalance, and Phil and I were perfectly suited for each other in that way.”


156. On great teams, the kind where people trust each other, engage in open conflict and then commit to decisions—team members have the courage and confidence to confront one another when they see something that isn't serving the team.'—Patrick Lencioni


157. “Feeling threatened whenever you confront conflicts can be a problem. You will likely respond to conflict by closing off or expressing things with bias and sometimes anger. This is not a healthy way of managing and addressing disagreements.” – John Ward


158. ”Servant leaders can be seen as challenging by those using other models, particularly power models, because awareness of different worldviews can be confrontational for some individuals”.


159. “they should be teased out. Labeling is a helpful tactic in de-escalating angry confrontations, because it makes the person acknowledge their feelings rather than continuing to act out.”


160. “Sometimes the best thing we can ask for is change, and a fresh start forces us to confront change head-on.” – Natalya Neidhart


161. “Without language, he [the newborn] learns to speak; without intelligence, he constructs it; he coordinates his movements and learns to walk; he becomes interested in things. Nothing existed. Everything has been constructed by him. In him we are confronted by the mysterious, miraculous fact of creation. ”


162. When God speaks to you about your potential, He will cause you to confront your past


163. “All of the great leaders have had one characteristic in common: it was the willingness to confront unequivocally the major anxiety of their people in their time. This, and not much else, is the essence of leadership.”


164. Running away from your problems is a race you’ll never win. Instead, reach out for help and try to confront them.


165. “The light that you discover in your life is proportionate to the amount of the darkness you are willing to forthrightly confront.”


166. “When you encounter obstacles, don’t turn your back on them. Face them, confront them, and you will see them dissolving in front of your eyes. ”


167. “God sees your sin as a debt you can't pay. There is no point in asking you to. To think that being good will somehow makes you square with God would be like Allie promising to clean up her room after being confronted with the damage she did to my car. Cleaning up her room doesn't pay me back. It's a nice gesture, but it doesn't fix my car.”


168. “Asking for help in this manner, after you’ve already been engaged in a dialogue, is an incredibly powerful negotiating technique for transforming encounters from confrontational showdowns into joint problem-solving sessions. And calibrated questions are the best tool.”


169. “The Bible tells us to "speak the truth in love" because we can't have community without candor. Solomon said, "An honest answer is a sign of true friendship." Sometimes this means caring enough to lovingly confront one who is sinning or is being tempted to sin.”


170. “There is something so powerful about a person who in one moment can be confident enough to confront a client about a sensitive personal issue, and then in the next moment humble themselves and take a position of servitude. It’s the paradoxical nature of it all that makes it work.”


171. "I had an eating disorder that threatened my life, and I was very afraid to confront it. I got sicker, and the whole world kept telling me how much better I looked. That's why I realized I wanted to be part of the solution."— Kesha


172. “I didn't know what caused this process, but I was glad the poems were only ever performed and never published. They floated away ethereally to the sound of applause. Real writers, and also painters, had to keep on looking at the ugly things they had done for good. I hated that everything I did was so ugly, but also that I lacked the courage to confront how ugly it was. I had explained that theory to Philip but he'd just said: don't be down on yourself, you're a real writer.”


173. “In honor of Oprah Winfrey: Even greater than the ability to inspire others with hope is the power to motivate them to give as much to the lives of others as they would give to their own; and to empower them to confront the worst in themselves in order to discover and claim the best in themselves.”


174. “If peace is really what you want, then you will choose peace. If peace mattered to you more than anything else and if you truly knew yourself to be spirit rather than a little me, you would remain nonreactive and absolutely alert when confronted with challenging people or situations. You would immediately accept the situation and thus become one with it rather than separate yourself from it.”


175. “Study the path of others to make your way easier and more abundant. Lean toward the whispers of your own heart, discover the universal truth, and follow its dictates. […] Release the need to hate, to harbor division, and the enticement of revenge. Release all bitterness. Hold only love, only peace in your heart, knowing that the battle of good to overcome evil is already won. Choose confrontation wisely, but when it is your time don’t be afraid to stand up, speak up, and speak out against injustice.”


176. All of the great leaders have had one characteristic in common: it was the willingness to confront unequivocally the major anxiety of their people in their time. This, and not much else, is the essence of leadership. —John Kenneth Galbraith


177. “When you are confronted by an opponent, conquer him with love.”


178. “I was glad the poems were only ever performed and never published. They floated away ethereally to the sound of applause. Real writers, and also painters, had to keep on looking at the ugly things they had done for good. I hated that everything I did was so ugly, but also that I lacked the courage to confront how ugly it was.”


179. “This is a very important lesson. You must never confuse faith that you will prevail in the end—which you can never afford to lose—with the discipline to confront the most brutal facts of your current reality, whatever they might be.”


180. “I have seen this restlessness among the people before. It was in another millennium, another decade, and at another time in our history, but it pushed through America like a storm. In ten short years, there was a tempest that transformed what the American Revolution did not address, what the Constitution and the Bill of Rights were afraid to confront, what the Civil War could not unravel, what Reconstruction tried to mediate, and Jim Crow did its best to retrench. This mighty wind made a fundamental shift in the moral character of our nation that has reached every sector of our society. And this history lends us one very powerful reminder today: Nothing can stop the power of a committed and determined people to make a difference in our society.”


181. “Going into our fear and confronting our greed, our weaknesses, our neediness is the way out. And the way out is through the mind, by choosing our thoughts.”


182. “You absolutely cannot make a series of good decisions without first confronting the brutal facts. The good-to-great companies operated”


183. “Life, just like poker, comes with a certain amount of risk. It should not be avoided. It should be confronted.” – Edward Norton


184. “When they go out of their way explaining and insisting especially if they haven’t been confronted…They are guilty as sin.” – Dru Edmund Kucherera


185. “We must turn all of our educational efforts to training our children for the choices which will confront them... The child who is to choose wisely must be healthy in mind and body. The children must be taught how to think, not what to think.”


186. “Real writers, and also painters, had to keep on looking at the ugly things they had done for good. I hated that everything I did was so ugly, but also that I lacked the courage to confront how ugly it was.”


187. “Yes, leadership is about vision. But leadership is equally about creating a climate where the truth is heard and the brutal facts confronted. There’s a huge difference between the opportunity to “have your say” and the opportunity to be heard. The good-to-great leaders understood this distinction, creating a culture wherein people had a tremendous opportunity to be heard and, ultimately, for the truth to be heard.”


188. “Alone in the silence, I understand for a moment the dread which many feel in the presence of primeval desert, the unconscious fear which compels them to tame, alter or destroy what they cannot understand, to reduce the wild and prehuman to human dimensions. Anything rather than confront directly the antihuman, that other world which frightens not through danger or hostility but in something far worse – its implacable indifference.” ― Edward Abbey


189. “It is one thing to be told of possible hardships ahead, it is entirely another to have to confront them in reality.”


190. “Most people, when confronted with something they don’t understand, do not realize they don’t understand it because they’re able to come up with an explanation that makes sense based on their own unique perspective and experiences in the world, however limited those experiences are. We all want the complicated world we live in to make sense. So we tell ourselves stories to fill in the gaps of what are effectively blind spots.”


191. For your calling to be fulfilled your issues must be confronted


192. “If you have Level 5 leaders who get the right people on the bus, if you confront the brutal facts of reality, if you create a climate where the truth is heard, if you have a Council and work within the three circles, if you frame all decisions in the context of a crystalline Hedgehog Concept, if you act from understanding, not bravado—if you do all these things, then you are likely to be right on the big decisions.”


193. “Every team needs either a confrontational star player or coach. In San Antonio, Gregg Popovich was that guy and Tim Duncan was not. In Golden State, Draymond Green is the confrontational one; Steve Kerr is not. For us, Phil was not that type of person, so I provided that force. You always have to have that balance and counterbalance, and Phil and I were perfectly suited for each other in that way.” ― Kobe Bryant


194. “Think back to how the doctor used calibrated questions to get his patient to stay. As his story showed, the key to getting people to see things your way is not to confront them on their ideas (“You can’t leave”) but to acknowledge their ideas openly (“I understand why you’re pissed off”) and then guide them toward solving the problem (“What do you hope to accomplish by leaving?”).”


195. “Work is not just an activity that generates funds and creates desire: It’s the vagabonding gestation period, wherein you earn your integrity, start making plans, and get your proverbial act together. Work is a time to dream about travel and write notes to yourself, but it’s also the time tie up your loose ends. Work is when you confront the problems you might otherwise be tempted to run away from. Work is how you settle your financial and emotional debts—so that your travels are not an escape from your real life, but a discovery of your real life.”


196. “Experiencing vulnerability isn’t a choice—the only choice we have is how we’re going to respond when we are confronted with uncertainty, risk, and emotional exposure. As a huge fan of the band Rush, this seems like the perfect place to throw in a quote from their song “Freewill”: “If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice.”


197. We’ve been together all this while, and survived through all storms. A part of you has grown in me, and I can feel it. It’s just you and me against the world, and we have to win. Our love has grown past whatever distance that is between us because words aren’t enough to express how I feel for you. You are that particular part of me I cherish and adore. Loving you has been one of the best decisions I’ve made so far. You and I are worlds apart physically, but our love is strong enough to confront any storm that comes our way.


198. ″[The radical] is not afraid to confront. to listen. to see the world unveiled. This person is not afraid to meet the people or to enter into dialogue with them. This person does not consider himself or herself the proprietor of history or of all people. or the liberator of the oppressed: but he or she does commit himself or herself. within history. to fight at their side.”


199. “It didn’t matter how bleak the situation or how stultifying their mediocrity, they all maintained unwavering faith that they would not just survive, but prevail as a great company. And yet, at the same time, they became relentlessly disciplined at confronting the most brutal facts of their current reality.” ― James C. Collins, Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap... and Others Don't


200. “A Narcissist will never admit they have a problem, if confronted with their own bad behavior they will do their very best to make people believe they are the victim.” ~ Harvey Stuarts


201. “The child realises that through his own efforts he can be independent and achieve things he has set his mind to. And gradually we educators are confronted with a simple but important fact: that to help the child is not what he needs, and indeed that to give help is an impediment for the child. Therefore he must be allowed to act freely on his own initiative in this free environment. ”


202. “As his story showed, the key to getting people to see things your way is not to confront them on their ideas (“You can’t leave”) but to acknowledge their ideas openly (“I understand why you’re pissed off”) and then guide them toward solving the problem (“What do you hope to accomplish by leaving?”).”


203. “Whenever you are confronted with an opponent. Conquer him with love.”


204. "Even those who are closest to you and most in love with you, the people you love most in the world will find clarity confronting at times.”


205. “All of the great leaders have had one characteristic in common: it was the willingness to confront unequivocally the major anxiety of their people in their time. This, and not much else is the essence of leadership.” – John Kenneth Galbraith

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