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500 Best Leaders Eat Last Quotes By Simon Sinek

1. “Let us all be the leaders we wish we had.”


2. Look at your leaders and ask if you would want to be in foxhole with them.


3. “Responsibility is not doing as we are told, that's obedience. Responsibility is doing what is right.”


4. -The demands of your work do not cause you stress. It is how you control your workers throughout the day and their feelings about it.


5. The more you control everything, the more stress you will be causing yourself and vice versa.


6. Truly human leadership protects an organization from the internal rivalries that can shatter a culture. When we have to protect ourselves from each other, the whole organization suffers. But when trust and cooperation thrive internally, we pull together and the organization grows stronger as a result. Good leadership is like exercise.


7. Judge a person by how he treats other people, not by how he treats you.


8. “it is not enough to know “the Why” of your organization; you must know your people and realize that they are much more than an expendable resource.”


9. “If certain conditions are met and the people inside an organization feel safe among each other, they will work together to achieve things none of them could have ever achieved alone. The result is that their organization towers over their competitors.”


10. “Trust is a biological reaction to the belief that someone has our well-being at heart.”


11. “Leadership, the Marines understand, is not about being right all the time. Leadership is not a rank worn on a collar. It is a responsibility that hinges almost entirely on character. Leadership is about integrity, honesty and accountability. All components of trust. Leadership comes from telling us not what we want to hear, but rather what we need to hear. To be a true leader, to engender deep trust and loyalty, starts with telling the truth.”


12. Not until those without information relinquish their control can an organization run better, smoother and faster and reach its maximum potential.


13. “To Kim, raising children has many lessons for running a company. Both require a balancing of short-term needs and long-term goals. “First and foremost, your commitment to them is for life,” Kim says. “Ultimately, you want them to become better people.” Kim thinks of his employees exactly the same way. He knows most people would never get rid of their children during hard times, so “how can we lay off our people under the same conditions?” he asks. “Despite how much we may fight with our siblings, we can’t get rid of family. We have to make it work.”


14. The Infinite Game: How Great Businesses Achieve Long-lasting Success. No ratings yet. View price on Amazon.com


15. “The only reason the field continues to grow is because of increasing demand. The more we try to make ourselves feel better, the worse we seem to feel.”


16. “Those who work hardest to help others succeed will be seen by the group as the leader or the “alpha” of the group. And being the alpha—the strong, supportive one of the group, the one willing to sacrifice time and energy so that others may gain—is a prerequisite for leadership.”


17. “I have no data to say exactly how long it takes to feel like we trust someone. I know it takes more than seven days and I know it takes fewer than seven years. I know it is quicker for some and slower for others. No one knows exactly how long it takes, but it takes patience.”


18. “Stress and anxiety at work have less to do with the work we do and more to do with weak management and leadership.”


19. “Let us all be the leaders we wish we had.” ― Simon Sinek, Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t


20. -Always try to understand the real meaning of leadership privilege which arrives at the cost of self-interest.


21. “You can easily judge the character of a man by how he treats those who can do nothing for him.”


22. “I know of no case study in history that describes an organization that has been managed out of a crisis. Every single one of them was led.”


23. “Leadership is not a rank worn on a collar. It is a responsibility that hinges almost entirely on character. Leadership is about integrity, honesty and accountability. All components of trust. Leadership comes from telling us not what we want to hear, but rather what we need to hear. To be a true leader, to engender deep trust and loyalty, starts with telling the truth.”


24. There’s lots of evidence that children who are deprived of human contact, deprived of sufficient doses of oxytocin, have trouble building trusting relationships later in life (Page 51). Oxytocin, released through physical contact (as well as healthy emotional environments), are absolutely critical for the well-being of children. Hold a child.


25. “When we do not have a sense of belonging, however, then we are forced to invest time and energy to protect ourselves from each other.”


26. “It is not the demands of the job that cause the most stress, but the degree of control workers feel they have throughout their day. The studies also found that the effort required by a job is not in itself stressful, but rather the imbalance between the effort we give and the reward we feel. Put simply: less control, more stress.”


27. Find Your Why: A Practical Guide for Discovering Purpose for You and Your Team. No ratings yet. View price on Amazon.com


28. “The number of leaders of companies who work hard to make their employees feel safe when they come in is, sadly, fewer than most of us would like to admit. Work is, well, work.”


29. Customers will never love a company until the employees love it first (Page 180). Such a great truth! If you’ve ever walked into a restaurant where the employees didn’t buy into the mission of the company, then you totally understand this.


30. “Si nos sentimos a salvo entre los nuestros, en nuestras propias tribus u organizaciones, nos relajamos y estamos más abiertos a la confianza y a la cooperación. Un”


31. “When the time is taken to build proper relationships and when leaders choose to put their people before their numbers, when we can actually feel a sense of trust for each other, the oxytocin released in our bodies can reverse many of the negative effects of operating in a high-stress, cortisol-soaked environment. In other words, it’s not the nature of the work we do or the number of hours we work that will help us reduce stress and achieve work-life balance; it’s increased amounts of oxytocin and serotonin. Serotonin boosts our self-confidence and inspires us to help those who work for us and make proud those for whom we work. Oxytocin relieves stress, increases our interest in our work and improves our cognitive abilities, making us better able to solve complex problems. It boosts our immune systems, lowers blood pressure, increases our libido and actually lessens our cravings and addictions. And best of all, it inspires us to work together.”


32. “Just because we become accustomed, just because it becomes normal, doesn’t mean it’s acceptable.”


33. “Some of us face the very real threat of losing our livelihoods if we try something new and lose the company some money. Politics also present a constant threat—the fear that others are trying to keep us down so that they may advance their own careers. Intimidation, humiliation, isolation, feeling dumb, feeling useless and rejection are all stresses we try to avoid inside the organization. But the danger inside is controllable and it should be the goal of leadership to set a culture free of danger from each other. And the way to do that is by giving people a sense of belonging. By offering them a strong culture based on a clear set of human values and beliefs. By giving them the power to make decisions. By offering trust and empathy. By creating a Circle of Safety.”


34. The unsatisfied feeling you get after a long hard working day is not because of the amount of effort you put into it. It is because there is no balance between your hard work and the outcome.


35. “Professor Grant arranged for students who received the scholarships to come to the office and spend five minutes describing to fund-raisers how the scholarship they received changed their lives. The students told them how much they appreciated the hard work of the fund-raising department. Even though the people impacted by the work of the fund-raisers were only there for a short time, the results were astounding. In the following month, the fund-raisers increased their average weekly revenue by more than 400 percent. In a separate similar study, callers showed an average increase of 142 percent in the amount of time they spent on the phone and a 171 percent increase in the amount of funds they raised.”


36. “To the men and women I’ve met in the United States Air Force— You have taught me more about what it means to be human than anyone who wears a suit ever did.”


37. -Always choose to sacrifice what is yours sooner and try to save what is your team members’.


38. ― Simon Sinek, Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don't


39. “As Bob Chapman, CEO of Barry-Wehmiller, is fond of saying, “No one wakes up in the morning to go to work with the hope that someone will manage us. We wake up in the morning and go to work with the hope that someone will lead us.”


40. Rick on Your Story: You May Start Slow…


41. “SuperSummary guides are very thorough, accurate, and easy to understand and navigate. The information is chapter specific and so it's easy to target certain things.”


42. “A story about tens of thousands of people struck down by their own military as they stood up for something noble does not have the same emotional impact on us as the story of one person does. We”


43. “Only when the Circle of Safety surrounds everyone in the organization, and not just a few people or a department or two, are the benefits fully realized.”


44. “The true price of leadership is the willingness to place the needs of others above your own. Great leaders truly care about those they are privileged to lead and understand that the true cost of the leadership privilege comes at the expense of self-interest.” ― Simon Sinek, Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t


45. “And that’s what trust is. We don’t just trust people to obey the rules, we also trust that they know when to break them.”


46. “Great leaders truly care about those they are privileged to lead and understand that the true cost of the leadership privilege comes at the expense of self-interest.”


47. Always try to be a great leader by thinking about others first and being willing to give up something that you wanted.


48. “when human beings, even engineers, are put in an environment for which we were designed. We stay. We remain loyal. We help each other and we do our work with pride and passion.”


49. “There was no “one thing” that Chapman did to transform his organization. It was a series of little things that, over time, dramatically affected how his company operates. Lots and lots of little things, some successful, some less so, but all focused on what he understood in his gut needed to happen.”


50. “What this means is that the converse is also true. A supportive and well-managed work environment is good for one’s health. Those who feel they have more control, who feel empowered to make decisions instead of waiting for approval, suffer less stress. Those only doing as they are told, always forced to follow the rules, are the ones who suffer the most. Our feelings of control, stress, and our ability to perform at our best are all directly tied to how safe we feel in our organizations. Feeling unsafe around those we expect to feel safe—those in our tribes (work is the modern version of the tribe)—fundamentally violates the laws of nature and how we were designed to live.”


51. “Simply stated, it is not enough to know “the Why” of your organization; you must know your people and realize that they are much more than an expendable resource. In short, professional competence is not enough to be a good leader; good leaders must truly care about those entrusted to their care.”


52. “A leader’s legacy is only as strong as the foundation they leave behind that allows others to continue to advance the organization in their name. Legacy is not the memory of better times when the old leader was there. That’s not legacy, that’s nostalgia. The founding fathers of the United States have a strong legacy because the United States was built to last long beyond their lifetimes.”


53. …To sacrifice the numbers to save the people, and not to sacrifice the people to save the numbers


54. “It is not the genius at the top giving directions that makes people great. It is great people that make the guy at the top look like a”


55. Nancy on Your Story: You May Start Slow…


56. “Leaders are the ones willing to look out for those to the left of them and those to the right of them. Leaders are the ones who are willing to give up something of their own for us. Their time, their energy, their money, maybe even the food off their plate. When it matters, leaders choose to eat last.”


57. “Leaders eat last” means that leaders first take care of their people, and only after they can think of themselves


58. “As leaders, it is our sole responsibility to protect our people and, in turn, our people will protect each other and advance the organization together. As employees or members of the group, we need the courage to take care of each other when our leaders don’t. And in doing so, we become the leaders we wish we had.”


59. “And that’s what trust is. We don’t just trust people to obey the rules, we also trust that they know when to break them. The rules are there for normal operations. The rules are designed to avoid danger and help ensure that things go smoothly.”


60. “The loan department of Wells Fargo Bank had a similar experience. When they invited a customer to come into the bank and describe how a loan had changed their life—how it allowed them to buy a house or pay off a debt—it had a dramatic effect on the motivation of bank employees to help more people do the same. They could see for themselves the impact their work was having in someone’s life. This is a significant shift in how the employees perceived their jobs and it is foundational to having a sense of purpose in the work we do. Without necessarily being aware of it, many of the employees stopped coming to work to sell loans and started coming to work to help people. Further proof of how much the quality of our work improves when we can attach a human being to the results was seen in a study that found that simply showing radiologists a photograph of a patient led to a dramatic improvement in the accuracy of their diagnostic findings. Adam Grant conducted another study on lifeguards at a community recreation center.”


61. “Why can’t we enjoy ourselves at work like we do when we’re not at work?”


62. A Zen Buddhist once said, how you do anything is how you do everything.


63. “Leaders Eat Last” starts with the difference between leaders and managers.


64. “unsure whether we will be thrown to the wolves, we become almost immobilized. It is the rustle in the grass, the fear of what may be lurking, that initiates the flow of cortisol into our bloodstreams. It is the cortisol that makes us as paranoid and focused on self-preservation”


65. “I heard a story about a former Under Secretary of Defense who gave a speech at a large conference. He took his place on the stage and began talking, sharing his prepared remarks with the audience. He paused to take a sip of coffee from the Styrofoam cup he’d brought on stage with him. He took another sip, looked down at the cup and smiled.


66. Building trust requires nothing more than telling the truth. That’s it. No complicated formula (Page 154). I love this simple definition.


67. – Treat your employees with respect and dignity and you’ll see the benefits (as results) in every dimension of your life and business.


68. “Our strength will come not from the sharpness of our spears, but from our willingness to offer others the protection of our shields.”


69. If you want to become a great leader, you need to actually think properly about the ones who are leading your organization.


70. “Destructive Abundance” is what I call the result of this imbalance. It is what happens when selfish pursuits are out of balance with selfless pursuits. When the levels of dopamine-incentivized behaviors overwhelm the social protections afforded by the other chemicals. When protecting the results is prioritized above protecting those who produce the results. Destructive Abundance happens when the players focus almost exclusively on the score and forget why they set out to play the game in the first place.”


71. “Not until those without information relinquish their control can an organization run better, smoother and faster and reach its maximum potential.”


72. “According to a Gallup poll conducted in 2013 called “State of the American Workplace,” when our bosses completely ignore us, 40 percent of us actively disengage from our work. If our bosses criticize us on a regular basis, 22 percent of us actively disengage. Meaning, even if we’re getting criticized, we are actually more engaged simply because we feel that at least someone is acknowledging that we exist! And if our bosses recognize just one of our strengths and reward us for doing what we’re good at, only 1 percent of us actively disengage from the work we’re expected to do.”


73. Always try to care about your people, not about the numbers. Only then everyone will solve problems, follow and see to it that your vision becomes reality in every way you wanted it to.


74. “Good leadership is like exercise. We do not see any improvement to our bodies with day-to-day comparisons. In fact, if we only compare the way our bodies look on a given day to how they looked the previous day, we would think our efforts had been wasted. It’s only when we compare pictures of ourselves over a period of weeks or months that we can see a stark difference. The impact of leadership is best judged over time.”


75. -Being a great leader means you have to take responsibility for all your team members for their successes and even their downfalls.


76. -Make your vision come alive stably and realistically, not in an expedient manner.


77. “As social animals, we feel stress when we feel unsupported. That subconscious unease, the feeling that we are responsible for ourselves and no one else is there to help, the feeling we get that most of the people with whom we work care primarily about themselves, is, to our primitive brain, quite scary. And the problem is not with the people, it is with the environment.”


78. “Leaps of greatness require the combined problem-solving ability of people who trust each other.”


79. ― Simon Sinek, Leaders Eat Last Deluxe: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don't


80. “It occurs to me,” he continued, “the ceramic cup they gave me last year . . . it was never meant for me at all. It was meant for the position I held. I deserve a Styrofoam cup.


81. “creating a culture in which the people naturally pull together to advance the business. And it is the ability to grow one’s people to do what needs to be done that creates stable, lasting success. It is not the genius at the top giving directions that makes people great. It is great people that make the guy at the top look like a genius.”


82. “It is not the demands of the job that cause the most stress, but the degree of control workers feel they have throughout their day.”


83. “Weak leaders are the ones who only extend the benefits of the Circle of Safety to their fellow senior executives and a chosen few others.”


84. “To sacrifice the numbers to save the people and not sacrifice the people to save the numbers.”


85. -Your rank in your office does not make you a leader. The way you work with others and handle situations speaks about the kind of leader that you are.


86. “But the myth of job stability may be the least of our concerns. A 2011 study conducted by a team of social scientists at the University of Canberra in Australia concluded that having a job we hate is as bad for our health and sometimes worse than not having a job at all. Levels of depression and anxiety among people who are unhappy at work were the same or greater than those who were unemployed. Stress and anxiety at work have less to do with the work we do and more to do with weak management and leadership. When we know that there are people at work who care about how we feel, our stress levels decrease. But when we feel like someone is looking out for themselves or that the leaders of the company care more about the numbers than they do us, our stress and anxiety go up. This is why we are willing to change jobs in the first place; we feel no loyalty to a company whose leaders offer us no sense of belonging or reason to stay beyond money and benefits.”


87. “In a weak culture, we veer away from doing “the right thing” in favor of doing “the thing that’s right for me.”


88. “Incluso el propio Welch acabaría admitiendo que poner la atención en el valor accionarial es «la idea más estúpida del mundo», insistiendo hasta el día de hoy que él siempre consideró ese valor un resultado, no una estrategia.”


89. “set out to change the conditions in which their employees operate. To create cultures that inspire people to give all they have to give simply because they love where they work.”


90. “Good leadership is like exercise. We do not see any improvement to our bodies with day-to-day comparisons. In fact, if we only compare the way our bodies look on a given day to how they looked the previous day, we would think our efforts had been wasted. It’s only when we compare pictures of ourselves over a period of weeks or months that we can see a stark difference. The impact of leadership is also best judged over time.”


91. Do not take the profit out of a rank you are in. Always think about the good of the people around you.


92. “Every single employee is someone’s son or someone’s daughter. Like a parent, a leader of a company is responsible for their precious lives.”


93. “Innovation is the result of a corporate culture of collaboration and sharing. In”


94. Great leaders give up the spotlight in order to focus on the things to be ahead in the future by spending a lot of time and energy with the help and support of their people.


95. Next Jump, which offers their employees lifetime employment – https://www.nextjump.com/


96. “But this year, as I stand here to speak to you, I am no longer the Under Secretary,” he continued. “I flew here coach class and when I arrived at the airport yesterday there was no one there to meet me. I took a taxi to the hotel, and when I got there, I checked myself in and went by myself to my room. This morning, I came down to the lobby and caught another taxi to come here. I came in the front door and found my way backstage. Once there, I asked one of the techs if there was any coffee. He pointed to a coffee machine on a table against the wall. So I walked over and poured myself a cup of coffee into this here Styrofoam cup,” he said as he raised the cup to show the audience.


97. “The more we give of ourselves to see others succeed, the greater our value to the group and the more respect they offer us. The more respect and recognition we receive, the higher our status in the group and the more incentive we have to continue to give to the group.”


98. “La serotonina aumenta nuestra confianza en nosotros mismos, y nos inspira a ayudar a quienes trabajan para nosotros y a hacer que nuestros jefes se enorgullezcan de nosotros. La oxitocina alivia el estrés, aumenta el interés que sentimos por nuestro trabajo y aumenta nuestra capacidad cognitiva, haciéndonos más capaces de resolver problemas complejos. Refuerza nuestro sistema inmunológico, reduce la tensión arterial, aumenta nuestra libido y reduce nuestros deseos intensos y nuestras adicciones. Y, lo mejor de todo, nos inspira a trabajar juntos.”


99. “Tal como lo resumió Goethe,9 el gran pensador del siglo XIX: «Podemos juzgar fácilmente el carácter de un hombre fijándonos en cómo trata a los que no pueden hacer nada por él».”


100. -The real deal for any leader is to think of efficient ways to put up with the team and bring them together to work as a good team.


101. “Trust is not formed through a screen, it is formed across a table. It takes a handshake to bind humans . . . and no technology yet can replace that. There is no such thing as virtual trust.”


102. “Whether you’re in a leadership role or not, the question is, how safe do you feel where you work?”


103. “This is the most important lesson I can impart to all of you,” he offered. “All the perks, all the benefits and advantages you may get for the rank or position you hold, they aren’t meant for you. They are meant for the role you fill. And when you leave your role, which eventually you will, they will give the ceramic cup to the person who replaces you. Because you only ever deserved a Styrofoam cup.”


104. All the perks, all the benefits and advantages you may get for the rank or position you hold, they aren’t meant for you. They are meant for the role you fill. And when you leave your role, which eventually you will, they will give the ceramic cup to the person who replaces you. Because you only ever deserved a Styrofoam cup.


105. “Leadership takes work. It takes time and energy. The effects are not always easily measured and they are not always immediate. Leadership is always a commitment to human beings.”


106. “By creating a Circle of Safety around the people in the organization, leadership reduces the threats people feel inside the group, which frees them up to focus more time and energy to protect the organization from the constant dangers outside and seize the big opportunities. Without a Circle of Safety, people are forced to spend too much time and energy protecting themselves from each other.”


107. “Generation Y is said to have a sense of entitlement. Many employers complain of the demands their entry-level employees often make. But I, as one observer, do not believe it is a sense of entitlement. This generation wants to work hard and is willing to work hard. What we perceive as entitlement is, in fact, impatience. An impatience driven by two things: First is a gross misunderstanding that things like success, money or happiness, come instantly. Even though our messages and books arrive the same day we want them, our careers and fulfillment do not. The second element is more unsettling. It is a result of a horrible short circuit to their internal reward systems. These Gen Yers have grown up in a world in which huge scale is normal, money is valued over service and technology is used to manage relationships. The economic systems in which they have grown up, ones that prioritize numbers over people, are blindly accepted, as if that’s the way it has always been.”


108. “Empathy would be injected into the company and trust would be the new standard. Preferring to see everyone as human instead of as a factory worker or office employee, Chapman made other changes so that everyone would be treated the same way.”


109. “As the Zen Buddhist saying goes, how you do anything is how you do everything.” ― Simon Sinek, Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t


110. “If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.”


111. Stress and anxiety at work have less to do with the work we do and more to do with weak management and leadership.


112. “Children are better off having a parent who works into the night in a job they love than a parent who works shorter hours but comes home unhappy. This is the influence our jobs have on our families. Working late does not negatively affect our children, but rather, how we feel at work does. Our jobs don’t just affect us. They affect our families.”


113. “This feeling of belonging, of shared values and a deep sense of empathy, dramatically enhances trust, cooperation and problem solving. United States Marines are better equipped to confront external dangers because they fear no danger from each other. They operate in a strong Circle of Safety.”


114. It is not the demands of the job that cause the most stress, but the degree of control workers feel they have throughout their day. The studies also found that the effort required by a job is not in itself stressful, but rather the imbalance between the effort we give and the reward we feel. Put simply: less control, more stress.


115. -Feeling content about your job is a natural human right that you are entitled to, but very few people get to feel it.


116. “Trust is like lubrication. It reduces friction and creates conditions much more conducive to performance.”


117. The true price of leadership is the willingness to place the needs of others above your own. Great leaders truly care about those they are privileged to lead and understand that the true cost of the leadership privilege comes at the expense of self-interest.


118. -A true leader always puts others’ needs above his own. This should be his volunteer willingness.


119. “Only 20 percent of Americans “love” their jobs.”


120. ———End of Preview———


121. “Everything about being a leader is like being a parent. It is about committing to the well-being of those in our care and having a willingness to make sacrifices to see their interests advanced so that they may carry our banner long after we are gone.”


122. “When we first show up to a new job, we’re excited, they’re excited, everything is perfect. But the trust we need to feel that our colleagues would watch our backs and help us grow, to really feel like we belong, takes time and energy.”


123. “We are not victims of our situation. We are the architects of it.”


124. ― Simon Sinek, Los líderes comen al final


125. Trust is not about knowing that your team follows the exact set of rules. Trusting means knowing that your team members are aware of when to disobey the rules and when not to.


126. “Our intelligence gives us ideas and instructions. But it is our ability to cooperate that actually helps us get those things done.”


127. “We need to know that the information we are given by others and especially our leaders, good or bad, is the truth. We need to know that when someone says something, they mean it. If we doubt their integrity, then we cannot trust them with our lives or the lives of those we love. If we doubt someone’s integrity, we would hesitate before jumping into a foxhole with them. The integrity of those in our community is, as our brain perceives it, a matter of life and death.”


128. “The leaders of great organizations do not see people as a commodity to be managed to help grow the money. They see the money as the commodity to be managed to help grow their people. This is why performance really matters.”


129. “Leadership, the Marines understand, is not about being right all the time. Leadership is not a rank worn on a collar. It is a responsibility that hinges almost entirely on character. Leadership is about integrity, honesty and accountability. All components of trust. Leadership comes from telling us not what we want to hear, but rather what we need to hear.”


130. “Being a leader is like being a parent, and the company is like a new family to join. One that will care for us like we are their own . . . in sickness and in health.”


131. “Selfish” chemicals: Endorphins and Dopamine. These work to help us get things done.


132. Never forget that your position in a company gives you all the advantages. It is not because of you. It is your position.


133. Every single employee is someone’s son or someone’s daughter. Like a parent, a leader of a company is responsible for their precious lives.”


134. “Strong leaders, in contrast, extend the Circle of Safety to include every single person who works for the organization. Self-preservation is unnecessary and fiefdoms are less able to survive. With”


135. “I have aced all my essays and writing assignments since using SuperSummary. The guide themes, chapter outlines and character summaries are more detailed than other sites.”


136. “A study by two researchers at the Graduate School of Social Work at Boston College found that a child’s sense of well-being is affected less by the long hours their parents put in at work and more by the mood their parents are in when they come home. Children are better off having a parent who works into the night in a job they love than a parent who works shorter hours but comes home unhappy. This is the influence our jobs have on our families. Working late does not negatively affect our children, but rather, how we feel at work does. Parents may feel guilty, and their children may miss them, but late nights at the office or frequent business trips are not likely the problem. Net-net, if you don’t like your work, for your kids’ sake, don’t go home.”


137. “Integrity is when our words and deeds are consistent with our intentions.” ― Simon Sinek, Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t


138. “Para obtener una sensación duradera de orgullo, debe existir la relación con un mentor/padre/jefe/entrenador/líder que la respalde.”


139. Southwest Airlines, where employees come first.


140. “For all the technology he has at his disposal, empathy, Johnny Bravo says, is the single greatest asset he has to do his job.”


141. “to confront external dangers because they fear no danger from each other. They operate in a strong Circle of Safety.”


142. “Truly human leadership protects an organization from the internal rivalries that can shatter a culture. When we have to protect ourselves from each other, the whole organization suffers. But when trust and cooperation thrive internally, we pull together and the organization grows stronger as a result.”


143. -A Zen Buddhist once said, how you do anything is how you do everything.


144. “When the people have to manage dangers from inside the organization, the organization itself becomes less able to face the dangers from outside.”


145. “the true price of leadership is the willingness to place the needs of others above your own.”


146. “If our leaders are to enjoy the trappings of their position in the hierarchy, then we expect them to offer us protection. The problem is, for many of the overpaid leaders, we know that they took the money and perks and didn’t offer protection to their people. In some cases, they even sacrificed their people to protect or boost their own interests. This is what so viscerally offends us. We only accuse them of greed and excess when we feel they have violated the very definition of what it means to be a leader.”


147. Bill Pence on Your Story: You May Start Slow…


148. “This is the reason we are so offended by the exorbitant and disproportionate compensations of some of the leaders of investment banks. It has nothing to do with the numbers. It has to do with this social contract deeply ingrained in what it means to be human. If our leaders are to enjoy the trappings of their position in the hierarchy, then we expect them to offer us protection. The problem is, for many of the overpaid leaders, we know that they took the money and perks and didn’t offer protection to their people. In some cases, they even sacrificed their people to protect or boost their own interests. This is what so viscerally offends us. We accuse them of greed and excess only when we feel they have violated the very definition of what it means to be a leader.”


149. “If good people are asked to work in a bad culture, one in which leaders do not relinquish control, then the odds of something bad happening go up. People will be more concerned about following the rules out of fear of getting in trouble or losing their jobs than doing what needs to be done. And when that happens, souls will be lost.”


150. The real deal for any leader is to think of efficient ways to put up with the team and bring them together to work as a good team.


151. “And when a leader embraces their responsibility to care for people instead of caring for numbers, then people will follow, solve problems and see to it that that leader’s vision comes to life the right way, a stable way and not the expedient way.”


152. “De hecho, nuestra capacidad para trabajar juntos, ayudarnos y protegernos mutuamente, funcionó tan bien que nuestras poblaciones hicieron algo más que sobrevivir: crecieron. Los elefantes también sobrevivieron, pero hoy día la vida de un elefante viene a ser en gran medida la misma que tenía hace millones de años. Pero nuestro caso es distinto. Nuestras vidas son totalmente diferentes a como lo eran hace cincuenta millones de años. Aunque nuestra especie fue diseñada para adaptarse a su entorno, se nos daba tan bien trabajar juntos y resolver problemas que encontramos maneras de moldear nuestro entorno de forma que se adaptase a nosotros. Cuanto mejor lo hacíamos, más mejoraba nuestra capacidad de alterar nuestras condiciones para satisfacer nuestras necesidades, en lugar de cambiar para adaptarnos a ellas. El problema es que nuestro código genético básico sigue siendo el mismo. Somos una raza anticuada que vive en un mundo moderno y lleno de recursos. Esto tiene ventajas evidentes, pero, como pasa con todo, también tiene un coste.”


153. You know you are a leader when everything you do inspires other people to learn, do, become and dream more.


154. “Many of us would say we’re not surprised by these findings. After all, it seems rather obvious. Or does it? Grant surveyed several thousand executives to find out how important it was to them that they feel their work has value. The results: only 1 percent of the executives said managers should bother showing employees that their work makes a difference. If anything, many companies try to explain the value our work will have in our own lives, the benefits we will reap if we hit a goal, as opposed to the benefit that others will derive. But remember our biology: we are naturally cooperative animals that are biologically more inspired and motivated when we know we are helping others. This”


155. “Los líderes débiles son aquellos que sólo ofrecen los beneficios propios del Círculo de Seguridad a sus compañeros ejecutivos y veteranos, y a unos pocos elegidos más. Cuidan unos de otros, pero no extienden la misma consideración a los que están fuera de su «círculo íntimo». Sin la protección de nuestros líderes, todos los que están fuera del círculo íntimo se ven obligados a trabajar solos o en pequeñas tribus para proteger y ampliar sus propios intereses. Al hacerlo, se forman camarillas, la política se anquilosa, los errores se ocultan en vez de exponerlos, se frena la transmisión de la información y la inquietud pronto sustituye todo sentido de cooperación y de seguridad.”


156. Build a team where everyone’s caliber matches one another. This will turn your vision into a remarkable reality with a well-put team.


157. -Be the leader that you once wished you had to guide you through in your life.


158. The importance for leaders to show empathy. Empathy is owed by leaders to everyone, all the time.


159. “These exceptional organizations all have cultures in which the leaders provide cover from above and the people on the ground look out for each other. This is the reason they are willing to push hard and take the kinds of risks they do. And the way any organization can achieve this is with empathy.”


160. “As nice as it sounds to build a company like Barry-Wehmiller, the reality is it’s just not happening. And without those companies it is going to be harder for us to find a job in a company that truly does care about our well-being.”


161. -If you want to become a great leader, you need to actually think properly about the ones who are leading your organization.


162. The demands of your work do not cause you stress. It is how you control your workers throughout the day and their feelings about it.


163. “Integrity is not about being honest when we agree with each other; it is also about being honest when we disagree or, even more important, when we make mistakes or missteps.”


164. “When our leaders give us something noble to be a part of, offer us a compelling purpose or reason why we should come to work, something that will outlive us, it seems to give us the power to do the right thing when called upon, even if we have to make sacrifices to our comfort in the short term.”


165. “Remember, these chemicals control our feelings. That’s why we can actually feel the weight of responsibility when others commit time and energy to support us. We want them to feel that the sacrifices they made for us were worth it. We don’t want to let them down. We want to make them proud. And if we are the ones giving the support, we feel an equal sense of responsibility. We want to do right by them so that they can accomplish all that they set out to do. It is because of serotonin that we can’t feel a sense of accountability to numbers; we can only feel accountable to people. This”


166. “All the perks, all the benefits and advantages you may get for the rank or position you hold, they aren’t meant for you. They are meant for the role you fill. And when you leave your role, which eventually you will, they will give the ceramic cup to the person who replaces you. Because you only ever deserved a Styrofoam cup.” ― Simon Sinek, Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t


167. -The real deal for any leader is to think of efficient ways to put up with the team and bring them together to work as a good team.


168. “When you are with Marines gathering to eat, you will notice that the most junior are served first and the most senior are served last. When you witness this act, you will also note that no order is given. Marines just do it. At the heart of this very simple action is the Marine Corps’ approach to leadership. Marine leaders are expected to eat last because the true price of leadership is the willingness to place the needs of others above your own. Great leaders truly care about those they are privileged to lead and understand that the true cost of the leadership privilege comes at the expense of self-interest.”


169. “The responsibility of leaders is to teach their people the rules, train them to gain competency and build their confidence.”


170. Do not sacrifice other’s interests to achieve yours’.


171. “It is because of serotonin that a college graduate feels a sense of pride and feels their confidence and status rise as they walk across the stage to receive their diploma. Technically, all a student needs to graduate is to pay their bills, fulfill their requirements and collect enough credits. But graduation probably wouldn’t feel the same if we received only an e-mail with a generic letter of congratulations and a downloadable attachment of the diploma.


172. “Customers will never love a company until the employees love it first.”


173. “Without the protection of our leaders, everyone outside the inner circle is forced to work alone or in small tribes to protect and advance their own interests. And in so doing, silos form, politics entrench, mistakes are covered up instead of exposed, the spread of information slows and unease soon replaces any sense of cooperation and security.”


174. “Leadership is the choice to serve others with or without any formal rank.”


175. “El liderazgo no es una licencia para hacer menos; es la responsabilidad de hacer más. Y ése es el problema. El liderazgo exige un trabajo. Requiere tiempo y energía. Los efectos no siempre se miden fácilmente, y no siempre son inmediatos. El liderazgo siempre es un compromiso con seres humanos”


176. -When it is required, leaders decide and determine to east last.


177. “Leadership, true leadership, is not the bastion of those who sit at the top. It is the responsibility of anyone who belongs to the group. Though those with formal rank may have authority to work at greater scale, each of us has a responsibility to keep the Circle of Safety strong. We must all start today to do little things for the good of others … one day at a time.”


178. “These exceptional organizations all have cultures in which the leaders provide cover from above and the people on the ground look out for each other. This is the reason they are willing to push hard and take the kinds of risks they do. And the way any organization can achieve this is with empathy.”


179. “Good Leadership Is Like Exercise. We Do Not See Any Improvement To Our Bodies With Day-To-Day Comparisons. In Fact, If We Only Compare The Way Our Bodies Look On A Given Day To How They Looked The Previous Day, We Would Think Our Efforts Had Been Wasted. It’s Only When We Compare Pictures Of Ourselves Over A Period Of Weeks Or Months That We Can See A Stark Difference. The Impact Of Leadership Is Best Judged Over Time.” – @Simonsinek


180. “When we opt to stay above the clouds, relying only on information fed to us instead of going down to see for ourselves, not only is it harder to make the right moral decisions, it makes it even harder to take responsibility when we fail to do so. The good news is, there are things we can do to help us manage the abstraction and keep our Circles strong.”


181. The impact of leadership is best seen over time.


182. A true leader always puts others’ needs above his own. This should be his volunteer willingness.


183. “Integrity is when our words and deeds are consistent with our intentions. A”


184. Being a great leader means you have to take responsibility for all your team members for their successes and even their downfalls.


185. “For most of us, we have warmer feelings for the projects we worked on where everything seemed to go wrong. We remember how the group stayed at work until 3:00 am, ate cold pizza and barely made the deadline. Those are the experiences we remember as some of our best days at work. It was not because of the hardship, per se, but because the hardship was shared. It is not the work we remember with fondness, but the camaraderie, how the group came together to get things done. And the reason is, once again, natural. In an effort to get us to help one another during times of struggle, our bodies release oxytocin. In other words, when we share the hardship, we biologically grow closer.”


186. “La serotonina aumenta nuestra confianza en nosotros mismos, y nos inspira a ayudar a quienes trabajan para nosotros y a hacer que nuestros jefes se enorgullezcan de nosotros. La oxitocina alivia el estrés, aumenta el interés que sentimos por nuestro trabajo y aumenta nuestra capacidad cognitiva, haciéndonos más capaces de resolver problemas complejos. Refuerza nuestro sistema inmunológico, reduce la tensión arterial, aumenta nuestra libido y reduce nuestros deseos intensos y nuestras adicciones. Y, lo mejor de todo, nos inspira a trabajar juntos.”


187. “When we cooperate or look out for others, serotonin and oxytocin reward us with the feelings of security, fulfillment, belonging, trust and camaraderie. When firing at the right times and for the right reasons, they can help turn any one of us into an inspiring leader, a loyal follower, a close friend, a trusted partner, a believer . . . a Johnny Bravo. And when that happens, when we find ourselves inside a Circle of Safety, stress declines, fulfillment rises, our want to serve others increases and our willingness to trust others to watch our backs skyrockets. When these social incentives are inhibited, however, we become more selfish and more aggressive. Leadership falters. Cooperation declines. Stress increases as do paranoia and mistrust.”


188. “true price of leadership is the willingness to place the needs of others above your own. Great leaders truly care about those they are privileged to lead and understand that the true cost of the leadership privilege comes at the expense of self-interest.”


189. A 2011 study conducted by a team of social scientists at the University of Canberra in Australia concluded that having a job we hate is as bad for our health and sometimes worse than not having a job at all (Page 27). Long story short, being in a job you hate is bad for your health.


190. “Simply stated, it is not enough to know “the Why” of your organization; you must know your people and realize that they are much more than an expendable resource. In short, professional competence is not enough to be a good leader; good leaders must truly care about those entrusted to their care.”


191. “creating a Circle of Safety around the people in the organization, leadership reduces the threats people feel inside the group, which frees them up to focus more time and energy to protect the organization from the constant dangers outside and seize the big opportunities. Without a Circle of Safety, people are forced to spend too much time and energy protecting themselves from each other.”


192. “a Circle of Safety, when people trust and share their successes and failures, what they know and what they don’t know, the result is innovation. It’s just natural.”


193. “«Si tus actos inspiran a otros a soñar más, aprender más, hacer más y ser más, eres un líder».”


194. “they are offering an opportunity for lifetime employment for those who want it, then the leaders of the company have to work hard to bring in the right people. “Firing is an easy option,” Kim says. “Tough love, coaching, even a program to help people find a job somewhere else if they decide our company is not for them are all much more effective, but require much more time and attention from the company.”


195. “We need to build more organizations that prioritize the care of human beings. As leaders, it is our sole responsibility to protect our people and, in turn, our people will protect each other and advance the organization together. As employees or members of the group, we need the courage to take care of each other when our leaders don’t. And in doing so, we become the leaders we wish we had.”


196. Bob Chapman, Chairman and CEO of Barry-Wehmiller Companies – http://www.trulyhumanleadership.com/?page_id=36. He describes his obligation to his employees as leading the sons and daughters of parents who have entrusted them to him.


197. “As social animals, we feel stress when we feel unsupported. That subconscious unease, the feeling that we are responsible for ourselves and no one else is there to help, the feeling we get that most of the people with whom we work care primarily about themselves, is, to our primitive brain, quite scary. And the problem is not with the people, it is with the environment.”


198. “It’s like they are standing at the foot of a mountain looking at the effect they want to have or success they want to feel at the peak. There is nothing wrong with looking for a faster way to scale the mountain. If they want to take a helicopter or invent a climbing machine that gets them up there quicker, more power to them. What they seem to fail to notice, however, is the mountain.”


199. “As Goethe, the great nineteenth-century thinker, reportedly summed up, “You can easily judge the character of a man by how he treats those who can do nothing for him.” If character describes how an individual thinks and acts, then the culture of an organization describes the character of a group of people and how they think and act as a collective. A company of strong character will have a culture that promotes treating all people well, not just the ones who pay them or earn them money in the moment.”


200. It is not the genius at the top giving directions that makes people great. It is great people that make the guy at the top look like a genius.


201. “Those who have an opportunity to work in organizations that treat them like human beings to be protected rather than a resource to be exploited come home at the end of the day with an intense feeling of fulfillment and gratitude. This should be the rule for all of us, not the exception. Returning from work feeling inspired, safe, fulfilled and grateful is a natural human right to which we are all entitled and not a modern luxury that only a few lucky ones are able to find.”


202. -Do not sacrifice other’s interests to achieve yours’.


203. “A good vision statement, in contrast, explains, in specific terms, what the world would look like if everything we did was wildly successful.”


204. Only about 20% of employees truly love their work.


205. “One point of view or a single, uncontested power is rarely a good thing. Like the visionary and the operator inside a company, Democrats and Republicans in Congress, the Soviets and Uncle Sam in geopolitics, even mom and dad at home, the value of two opposing forces, the tension of push and pull actually keeps things more stable. It’s all about balance.”


206. -Great leaders run into danger first, before their team members.


207. “Our strength will come not from the sharpness of our spears, but from our willingness to offer others the protection of our shields.”


208. -Always try to care about your people, not about the numbers. Only then everyone will solve problems, follow and see to it that your vision becomes reality in every way you wanted it to.


209. -When you see how a person treats other people who do nothing for him, you get to know about the character of the person himself.


210. “numbers never save anyone in hard times. People do.”


211. “Leaders are to provide direction and intent and allow others to figure out what to do and how to get there.” And this is”


212. “Human resources consultancy Mercer LLC reported that between fourth quarter 2010 and first quarter 2011, one in three employees seriously considered leaving their jobs, up 23 percent from five years prior. The problem was that less than 1.5 percent of employees actually voluntarily left. This is one of the issues with a bad working environment. Like a bad relationship, even if we don’t like it, we don’t leave. Maybe it’s the feeling of the devil-you-know-is-better-than-the-devil-you-don’t or maybe it’s something else, but people seem to feel stuck in unhealthy work environments.”


213. “My favorite definition of love is giving someone the power to destroy us and trusting they won’t use it.”


214. -Build a team where everyone’s caliber matches one another. This will turn your vision into a remarkable reality with a well-put team.


215. When the people have to manage dangers from inside the organization, the organization itself becomes less able to face the dangers from outside.


216. “And when a leader embraces their responsibility to care for people instead of caring for numbers, then people will follow, solve problems and see to it that that leader’s vision comes to life the right way, a stable way and not the expedient way.” ― Simon Sinek, Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t


217. “Leadership is not a license to do less; it is a responsibility to do more.”


218. “Every single one of us should look at our managers or the leaders of the companies we work for and ask ourselves, “Would I want to be in a foxhole with you?” And the managers and the leaders of companies who rely on our hard work should, in turn, ask themselves, “How strong is our company if the answer is no?”


219. Taj Hotel in India, which put its customers ahead of the company.


220. “The leaders of great organizations do not see people as a commodity to be managed to help grow the money. They see the money as the commodity to be managed to help grow their people. This”


221. -Never forget that your position in a company gives you all the advantages. It is not because of you. It is your position.


222. “Building trust requires nothing more than telling the truth. That’s it.”


223. “You can easily judge the character of a man by how he treats those who can do nothing for him.” ― Simon Sinek, Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t


224. Bill Gore’s 150 person limit, which is the number of relationships that we can effectively manage.


225. “It is not the genius at the top giving directions that makes people great. It is great people that make the guy at the top look like a genius.” ― Simon Sinek, Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t


226. “This means that happy, inspired and fulfilled employees are the exception rather than the rule. According to the Deloitte Shift Index, 80 percent of people are dissatisfied with their jobs.”


227. “The studies also found that the effort required by a job is not in itself stressful, but rather the imbalance between the effort we give and the reward we feel.”


228. “true price of leadership is the willingness to place the needs of others above your own.”


229. “Push to Completion Responsibility or accountability isn’t about starting a task or a project. It happens when we carry it to completion. For example, every now and then I ask someone to help me find something or get a hold of someone. A few days go by and I don’t hear back, so I follow up on my request. “I looked it up but couldn’t find anything” is the answer I get, or “I e-mailed him but haven’t gotten a reply back yet.” Those who are brilliant at pushing to completion do all the things the rest of us do to start a task and when they run into a roadblock, figure out all the other ways they can continue to make progress. They don’t simply repeat what they’ve done. When asked about their progress they don’t reply, “I’ll try to e-mail him again.” The really gifted Completers start thinking about what workarounds they can use if whatever they tried before isn’t working well enough or quickly enough. Even if they never end up having to use that next step, it’s already been considered. The gift of this practice is that the next time a similar challenge comes up, ideas are already generated, and new relationships already exist thanks to the way they handled things the previous time. This is what makes them so resourceful. It’s not how they solved one problem, it’s how prepared they are to solve the next problem.”


230. “Anything that separates us from the impact our words and actions have on other people has the potential to lead us down a dangerous path.”


231. -Always do a job that you love so that when you return home after a long day, you feel inspired, fulfilled, grateful and safe, not stressed.


232. “Those who have an opportunity to work in organisations that treat them like human beings to be protected rather than a resource to be exploited come home at the end of the day with an intense feeling of fulfillment and gratitude. This should be the rule for all of us, not the exception. Returning from work feeling inspired, safe, fulfilled and grateful is a natural human right to which we are all entitled and not a modern luxury that only a few lucky ones are able to find.”


233. “Simply seeing or hearing about acts of human generosity actually inspires us to want to do the same. I”


234. -Great leaders give up the spotlight in order to focus on the things to be ahead in the future by spending a lot of time and energy with the help and support of their people.


235. “The only thing our leaders ever need to do is remember whom they serve and it will be our honor and pleasure to serve them back.”


236. “If the leaders of organizations give their people something to believe in, if they offer their people a challenge that outsizes their resources but not their intellect, the people will give everything they’ve got to solve the problem. And in the process, not only will they invent and advance the company, they may even change an industry or the world in the process (just as an early version of Microsoft did). But if the resources are vastly greater than the problem before us, then the abundance works against us. Though it may take small steps to make a big leap, it is the vision of the big leap and not the action of the small steps that inspires us. And only after we have committed ourselves to that vision can we look back at our lives and say to ourselves that the work we did mattered.”


237. “The rank of office is not what makes someone a leader. Leadership is the choice to serve others with or without any formal rank.” ― Simon Sinek, Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t


238. “Leadership is always a commitment to human beings.”


239. Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action. No ratings yet. View price on Amazon.com


240. “The cost of leadership,” explains Lieutenant General George Flynn of the United States Marine Corps, “is self-interest.”


241. “It turns out, even when offered big titles and bigger salaries, people would rather work at a place in which they feel like they belong. People would rather feel safe among their colleagues, have the opportunity to grow and feel a part of something bigger than themselves than work in a place that simply makes them rich. This is what happens when human beings, even engineers, are put in an environment for which we were designed. We stay. We remain loyal. We help each other and we do our work with pride and passion.”


242. “Leaders are the ones willing to look out for those to the left of them and those to the right of them. They are often willing to sacrifice their own comfort for ours, even when they disagree with us. Trust is not simply a matter of shared opinions. Trust is a biological reaction to the belief that someone has our well-being at heart. Leaders are the ones who are willing to give up something of their own for us. Their time, their energy, their money, maybe even the food off their plate. When it matters, leaders choose to eat last.”


243. -Always try to be a great leader by thinking about others first and being willing to give up something that you wanted.


244. Lead people, not the numbers


245. Feeling content about your job is a natural human right that you are entitled to, but very few people get to feel it.


246. When your words and works combine and mean the same as your intentions, that makes you a person with integrity.


247. -Managing your problems with your best people will make you good, but to become great as a leader, you have to build opportunities for them as well.


248. The Ralph Lauren Company which voluntarily owned up to a mistake.


249. “What makes a good leader is that they eschew the spotlight in favor of spending time and energy to do what they need to do to support and protect their people. And when we feel the Circle of Safety around us, we offer our blood and sweat and tears and do everything we can to see our leader’s vision come to life. The only thing our leaders ever need to do is remember whom they serve and it will be our honor and pleasure to serve them back.”


250. Returning from work feeling inspired, safe, fulfilled and grateful is a natural human right to which we are all entitled and not a modern luxury that only a few lucky ones are able to find. All the perks, all the benefits and advantages you may get for the rank or position you hold, they aren’t meant for you. They are meant for the role you fill. And when you leave your role, which eventually you will, they will give the ceramic cup to the person who replaces you. Because you. only ever deserved a Styrofoam cup.


251. -Judge a person by how he treats other people, not by how he treats you.


252. Get To Know Your “Happy Chemicals.”


253. “Empathy is not something we offer to our customers or our employees from nine to five... (it) is... "a second by second, minute by minute service that [we] owe to everyone if [we] want to call [ourselves] a leader.”


254. “There is a pattern that exists in the organizations that achieve the greatest success, the ones that outmaneuver and outinnovate their competitors, the ones that command the greatest respect from inside and outside their organizations, the ones with the highest loyalty and lowest churn and the ability to weather nearly every storm or challenge.”


255. “Los líderes de las mejores organizaciones no consideran a sus trabajadores un material que deben manipular para contribuir a ganar más dinero. Entienden que el dinero es el material que hay que gestionar para ayudar a su gente a crecer. Por eso el rendimiento es tan importante. Cuanto mejor funcione una empresa, más combustible habrá para construir una organización más grande y robusta, que alimente los corazones y las mentes de quienes trabajan en ella. A su vez, las personas dan todo lo que tienen para ver a su empresa crecer… y crecer… y crecer. Considerar”


256. “Welch and others, through the 1980s, pioneered using people as an expendable resource to the benefit of investors. Since then, it has become increasingly more common for companies to use layoffs to beef up their bottom line. It is considered an acceptable business practice today to lay off people, often ending their careers, simply to balance the books for the quarter or the year. If careers are to be ended, it should be for negligence or incompetence or as a last resort to save the company. But in our twenty first-century version of capitalism, the expectation that we are working in meritocracies seems false. In many cases, it doesn’t matter how hard we’ve worked; if the company falls a little short, people will have to be laid off. No hard feelings, it’s just business. Can you imagine getting rid of one of your children because you made less money than you expected last year? Imagine how your kids would feel if that were the plan. Well, that’s how it is in too many companies today.”


257. “The goal of a leader is to give no orders,” Captain Marquet explains. “Leaders are to provide direction and intent and allow others to figure out what to do and how to get there.”


258. Abundance can be destructive because it abstracts the value of things. The more we have, the less we seem to value what we’ve got. And if the abstraction of stuff makes us value it less, imagine what it does to our relationships (Page 96). Abstraction is incredibly unhealthy, when people become numbers on a spreadsheet. Where relationships become less face-to-face and more about ‘likes’ and ‘retweets.’ Abstraction is dangerous.


259. A close study of high-performing organizations, the ones in which the people feel safe when they come to work, reveals something astounding. Their cultures have an eerie resemblance to the conditions under which the human animal was designed to operate (Page 14). The premise of his book is that any organization (whether for-profit or non-profit) operates best when the conditions are optimal. These conditions are the same ones that allow the human body to thrive. Fascinating premise.


260. “Simon would like to make the world a better place for all of us. His vision is simple: to create a new generation of men and women who understand that an organization’s success or failure is based on leadership excellence and not managerial acumen.”


261. Dopamine, which creates the feeling of satisfaction we get after we have completed a task. The flood of dopamine on a brain can operate as an incentive for progress, but there is downside – it is addictive. If an organization is heavily focused on performance, meaning dopamine is the primary means of the reward (you hit the goal, you get the bonus), we can become addicted to the numbers rather than the thing that matters most: the people.


262. “There’s a growing body of evidence that the companies that are most successful at maximizing shareholder value over time are those that aim toward goals other than maximizing shareholder value, Justin Fox and Jay Lorsch wrote in the July–August 2012 issue of the Harvard Business Review. Employees and customers often know more about and have more of a long-term commitment to a company than shareholders do.”


263. “When we feel like we belong to the group and trust the people with whom we work, we naturally cooperate to face outside challenges and threats. When we do not have a sense of belonging, however, then we are forced to invest time and energy to protect ourselves from each other.”


264. “Leaders Eat Last” is a great-sounding book.


265. You have to lead your organization out of a crisis. No organization was handled in a crisis, it was led. Be the leader that leads everyone out of trouble.


266. “if we are able to physically see what we are setting out to accomplish or clearly imagine it, then we are indeed, thanks to the powers of dopamine, more likely to accomplish that goal.”


267. Try being a parent who works late but is happy with the job than being someone who comes home early but is unhappy. This will affect your children.


268. “Just as a parent can’t buy the love of their children with gifts, a company can’t buy the loyalty of their employees with salaries and bonuses. What produces loyalty, that irrational willingness to commit to the organization even when offered more money elsewhere, is the feeling that the leaders of the company would be willing, when it matters, to sacrifice their time and energy to help us. We will judge a boss who spends time after hours to help us as more valuable than a boss who simply gives us a bonus when we hit a target.”


269. There is another thing to add to that list of things that can hijack our dopamine reward system: social media (Page 43). Sinek is in the midst of a detailed explanation how addictions (like alcohol and tobacco) short-circuit our reward systems to trigger a release of dopamine, the high we feel in any addiction. Research is finding that social media does the exact same thing. Social media is addictive.


270. Great leaders run into danger first, before their team members.


271. “La responsabilidad no consiste en hacer lo que nos mandan, eso es la obediencia. La responsabilidad es hacer lo que está bien.”


272. When you are a great leader, it requires the combined problem of solving the ability of people who trust each other.


273. “Working with a sense of obligation is replaced by working with a sense of pride. And coming to work for the company is replaced by coming to work for each other. Work is no longer a place to dread. It is a place to feel valued.”


274. “exceptional organizations all have cultures in which the leaders provide cover from above and the people on the ground look out for each other. This is the reason they are willing to push hard and take the kinds of risks they do. And the way any organization can achieve this is with empathy.”


275. “Selfless” chemicals: Serotonin and Oxytocin. These work to help strengthen our social bonds, fostering connection and collaboration.


276. Children are better off having a parent who works into the night in a job they love than a parent who works shorter hours but comes home unhappy.


277. “If the trusty hunters gave up at any time simply because they were exhausted, then they, and those in their tribe, would not eat very often and would eventually die off. And so Mother Nature designed a clever incentive to encourage us to keep going—a little endorphin rush.”


278. “It is because of dopamine that, in our modern day, we like shopping or collecting things—though there is no rational benefit to most of our hobbies, we enjoy them because they satisfy our prehistoric foraging desires.”


279. -Trust is not about knowing that your team follows the exact set of rules. Trusting means knowing that your team members are aware of when to disobey the rules and when not to.


280. “One of my favorite examples comes from the heady days of America Online (AOL). The company would routinely send out CDs in an attempt to get people to sign up for its product. One group within the company, responsible for acquisitions, was given financial incentives for hitting subscription goals. And so all tactics were designed to do just that: sign people up. There were offers of 100 free hours in the first month, which became 250 free hours, then even 700 hours. I remember when the offer got to 1,000 free hours, as long as they were used in the first 45 days (which left 1.7 hours of sleep per night for anyone who could take advantage of the promotion). It worked. Whatever tactics the acquisition group members developed were designed to do one thing and one thing only—maximize their bonus. The problem was there was another group responsible for retention; they had to find ways to get all the people who had canceled their


281. If our leaders are to enjoy the trappings of their position in the hierarchy, then we expect them to offer us protection. The problem is, for many of the overpaid leaders, we know that they took the money and perks and didn’t offer protection to their people. In some cases, they even sacrificed their people to protect or boost their own interests. This is what so viscerally offends us. We only accuse them of greed and excess when we feel they have violated the very definition. of what it means to be a leader.


282. “Simon would like to make the world a better place for all of us. His vision is simple: to create a new generation of men and women who understand that an organization’s success or failure is based on leadership excellence and not managerial acumen.”


283. “Leaps of greatness require the combined problem-solving ability of people who trust each other.” ― Simon Sinek, Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t


284. “To a social animal, trust is like lubrication. It reduces friction and creates conditions much more conducive to performance,”


285. “This is what happens when the leaders of an organization listen to the people who work there. Without coercion, pressure or force, the people naturally work together to help each other and advance the company.”


286. “Captain Marquet came to understand that the role of the leader is not to bark commands and be completely accountable for the success or failure of the mission. It is a leader’s job instead to take responsibility for the success of each member of his crew. It is the leader’s job to ensure that they are well trained and feel confident to perform their duties. To give them responsibility and hold them accountable to advance the mission. If the captain provides direction and protection, the crew will do what needs to be done to advance the mission.”


287. “As leaders, it is our sole responsibility to protect our people and, in turn, our people will protect each other and advance the organization together.”


288. 3M, which has a culture of sharing, innovation and collaboration.


289. “You know,” he said, interrupting his own speech, “I spoke here last year. I presented at this same conference on this same stage. But last year, I was still an Under Secretary,” he said. “I flew here in business class and when I landed, there was someone waiting for me at the airport to take me to my hotel. Upon arriving at my hotel,” he continued, “there was someone else waiting for me. They had already checked me into the hotel, so they handed me my key and escorted me up to my room. The next morning, when I came down, again there was someone waiting for me in the lobby to drive me to this same venue that we are in today. I was taken through a back entrance, shown to the greenroom and handed a cup of coffee in a beautiful ceramic cup.”


290. “when the leaders of an organization listen to the people who work there. Without coercion, pressure or force, the people naturally work together to help each other and advance the company. Working with a sense of obligation is replaced by working with a sense of pride. And coming to work for the company is replaced by coming to work for each other. Work is no longer a place to dread. It is a place to feel valued.”


291. “Professor Grant arranged for students who received the scholarships to come to the office and spend five minutes describing to fund-raisers how the scholarship they received changed their lives. The students told them how much they appreciated the hard work of the fund-raising department. Even though the people impacted by the work of the fund-raisers were only there for a short time, the results were astounding. In the following month, the fund-raisers increased their average weekly revenue by more than 400 percent.”


292. “As Bob Chapman, CEO of Barry-Wehmiller, is fond of saying, “No one wakes up in the morning to go to work with the hope that someone will manage us. We wake up in the morning and go to work with the hope that someone will lead us.” The problem is, for us to be led, there must be leaders we want to follow.”


293. Be the leader that you once wished you had to guide you through in your life.


294. “Intimidation, humiliation, isolation, feeling dumb, feeling useless and rejection are all stresses we try to avoid inside the organization. But the danger inside is controllable and it should be the goal of leadership to set a culture free of danger from each other. And the way to do that is by giving people a sense of belonging. By offering them a strong culture based on a clear set of human values and beliefs. By giving them the power to make decisions. By offering trust and empathy. By creating a Circle of Safety.”


295. “The Whole Purpose Of Maintaining The Circle Of Safety Is So That We Can Invest All Our Time And Energy To Guard Against The Dangers Outside. It’s The Same Reason We Lock Our Doors At Night.” – @Simonsinek


296. “When you have people who trust you, they’re going to do a better job for you to earn or keep that trust.” In the more than ten years since the chain-link fence came down, there has been almost no theft. And if an employee has a personal problem, they know the leaders of the company—and their fellow employees—will be there for them.”


297. “Civilizations don’t usually die from murder, to paraphrase the famous British historian Arnold Toynbee. Civilizations die from suicide. It is increasing dangers inside our organizations that threaten us most. And fortunately, those dangers are well within our control.”


298. “Instead, managers must become leaders in their own right, which means they must take responsibility for the care and protection of those in their charge, confident that their leaders will take care of them.”


299. “Some Believe We Should Always Put Others First—That If We Don’t Look Out For The Group, The Group Won’t Look Out For Us. Others Believe We Should Always Put Ourselves First And That If We Don’t Take Care Of Ourselves First, Then We Would Be Of No Use To Anyone Else. The Fact Is, Both Are True.” – @Simonsinek


300. “Seamos esos líderes que deseamos tener.”


301. “No one wakes up in the morning to go to work with the hope that someone will manage us. We wake up in the morning and go to work with the hope that someone will lead us.”


302. “So when our boss comes down hard on us and we don’t know the reason, it is equally our responsibility to express concern for their well-being. That’s how the Circle of Safety stays strong.”


303. -When your words and works combine and mean the same as your intentions, that makes you a person with integrity.


304. And when a leader embraces their responsibility to care for people instead of caring for numbers, then people will follow, solve problems and see to it that that leader’s vision comes to life the right way, a stable way and not the expedient way. It is not the genius at the top giving directions that makes people great. It is great people that make the guy at the top look like a genius.


305. “However, when those inside the bureaucracy work primarily to protect themselves, progress slows and the entire organization becomes more susceptible to external threats and pressures. Only when the Circle of Safety surrounds everyone in the organization, and not just a few people or a department or two, are the benefits fully realized. Weak leaders are the ones who only extend the benefits of the Circle of Safety to their fellow senior executives and a chosen few others. They look out for each other, but they do not offer the same considerations to those outside their “inner circle.” Without the protection of our leaders, everyone outside the inner circle is forced to work alone or in small tribes to protect and advance their own interests. And in so doing, silos form, politics entrench, mistakes are covered up instead of exposed, the spread of information slows and unease soon replaces any sense of cooperation and security.”


306. “When the people have to manage dangers from inside the organization, the organization itself becomes less able to face the dangers from outside. Truly”


307. We often see our best days at work as those in which we had a shared hardship and how the group came together. We share the hardship as we grow closer.


308. “To Kim, raising children has many lessons for running a company. Both require a balancing of short-term needs and long-term goals. “First and foremost, your commitment to them is for life,” Kim says. “Ultimately, you want them to become better people.” Kim thinks of his employees exactly the same way. He knows most people would never get rid of their children during hard times, so “how can we lay off our people under the same conditions?” he asks. “Despite how much we may fight with our siblings, we can’t get rid of family. We have to make it work.”


309. Your commitment to people is a major part of leadership.


310. “Leaders are the ones who are willing to give up something of their own for us. Their time, their energy, their money, maybe even the food off their plate. When it matters, leaders choose to eat last.”


311. Always choose to sacrifice what is yours sooner and try to save what is your team members’.


312. Managing your problems with your best people will make you good, but to become great as a leader, you have to build opportunities for them as well.


313. “In short, professional competence is not enough to be a good leader; good leaders must truly care about those entrusted to their care.”


314. “Children are better off having a parent who works into the night in a job they love than a parent who works shorter hours but comes home unhappy.”


315. “This is the reason we like to be given a clear goal to achieve to receive a bonus instead of being given some amorphous instructions. It’s not very motivating or helpful to be told that we will receive a performance bonus if we achieve “more.” How much more? Give us something specific to set our sights on, something we can measure our progress toward, and we are more likely to achieve it.”


316. -Energy and time, will be consumed when you are giving your best to be a leader.


317. Cultivate Your “Circle Of Safety.”


318. “If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.” ― Simon Sinek, Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t


319. “Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. told us that he had a dream. That one day, “little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.” We can imagine that; we can see what that looks like. And if we find that vision inspiring and worthy of our time and energy, then we can more easily plan the steps we need to take to achieve that vision. Short or long term, the clearer we can see what we are setting out to achieve, the more likely we are to achieve it. It’s exciting, thanks to dopamine. This is why the best visions offer us something that, for all practical purposes, we will never actually reach, but for which we would gladly die trying. Each point in our journey is an opportunity to feel like we’re making progress toward something bigger than ourselves.”


320. -When you are a great leader, it requires the combined problem of solving the ability of people who trust each other.


321. “AS IF THE abstracting qualities of numbers and scale aren’t enough to deal with when trying to run an organization, these days we have the added complication of the virtual world. The Internet is nothing short of awe inspiring. It gives the power to operate at scale or spread ideas to anyone, be it a small business or a social movement. It gives us the ability to find and connect with people more easily. And it is incredible at speeding the pace of commercial transactions. All of these things are good. But, just as money was developed to help expedite and simplify transactions by allowing payment to be rendered without barter, we often use the Internet as a means to expedite and simplify communication and the relationships we build. And just as money can’t buy love, the Internet can’t buy deep, trusting relationships. What makes a statement like that somewhat tricky or controversial is that the relationships we form online feel real. We can, indeed, get bursts of serotonin when people “like” our pictures, pages or posts or when we watch ourselves go up in a ranking (you know how much serotonin loves a ranking). The feelings of admiration we get from virtual “likes” or the number of followers we have is not like the feelings of admiration we get from our children, or that a coach gets from their players. It is simply a public display of “like” with no sacrifice required—a new kind of status symbol, if you will. Put simply, though the love may feel real, the relationship is still virtual. Relationships can certainly start online, but they only become real when we meet face-to-face.”


322. Good leadership is like exercise. We do not see any improvement to our bodies with day-to-day comparisons. In fact, if we only compare the way our bodies look on a given day to how they looked the previous day, we would think our efforts had been wasted. It’s only when we compare pictures of ourselves over a period of weeks or months that we can see a stark difference. The impact of leadership is best judged over time (Page 175). Good leadership takes time. It can never be rushed.


323. Product. Rating


324. -Efforts do not give immediate results and neither are they easily measurable.


325. “Leaders Eat Last” starts with the difference between leaders and managers.


326. “a child’s sense of well-being is affected less by the long hours their parents put in at work and more by the mood their parents are in when they come home. Children are better off having a parent who works into the night in a job they love than a parent who works shorter hours but comes home unhappy. This is the influence our jobs have on our families.”


327. “As the Zen Buddhist saying goes, how you do anything is how you do everything.”


328. “When you are with Marines gathering to eat, you will notice that the most junior are served first and the most senior are served last. When you witness this act, you will also note that no order is given. Marines just do it.”


329. “Every single employee is someone’s son or someone’s daughter. Parents work to offer their children a good life and a good education and to teach them the lessons that will help them grow up to be happy, confident and able to use all the talents they were blessed with. Those parents then hand their children over to a company with the hope the leaders of that company will exercise the same love and care as they have. “It is we, the companies, who are now responsible for these precious lives,” says Chapman, as he balls his hands into fists with the conviction of a devoted preacher. This is what it means to be a leader. This is what it means to build a strong company.”


330. “It is a leader’s job instead to take responsibility for the success of each member of his crew. It is the leader’s job to ensure that they are well trained and feel confident to perform their duties. To give them responsibility and hold them accountable to advance the mission.”


331. All the components of trust are what leadership is all about: integrity, honesty, accountability.


332. -You know you are a leader when everything you do inspires other people to learn, do, become and dream more.


333. “The ability of a group of people to do remarkable things hinges on how well those pull together as a team.”


334. “When we feel safe among the people with whom we work, the more likely we are to survive and thrive. That’s just the way it is.”


335. “What makes a good leader is that they eschew the spotlight in favor of spending time and energy to do what they need to do to support and protect their people.”


336. “The responsibility of a leader is to provide cover from above for their people who are working below. When the people feel that they have the control to do what’s right, even if it sometimes means breaking the rules, then they will more likely do the right thing. Courage comes from above. Our confidence to do what’s right is determined by how trusted we feel by our leaders.”


337. “And that’s what trust is. We don’t just trust people to obey the rules, we also trust that they know when to break them. The rules are there for normal operations. The rules are designed to avoid danger and help ensure that things go smoothly. And though there are guidelines for how to deal with emergencies, at the end of the day, we trust the expertise of a special few people to know when to break the rules.”


338. A study by two researchers at the Graduate School of Social Work at Boston College found that a child’s sense of well-being is affected less by the long hours their parents put in at work and more by the mood their parents are in when they come home. Children are better of having a parent who works into the night in a job they love than a parent who works shorter hours but comes home unhappy. This is the influence our jobs have on our families. Working late does not negatively affect our children, but rather, how we feel at work does (Page 31). Our jobs don’t just affect us. They affect our families.


339. “Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. told us that he had a dream. That one day, “little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.” We can imagine that; we can see what that looks like. And if we find that vision inspiring and worthy of our time and energy, then we can more easily plan the steps we need to take to achieve that vision. Short or long term, the clearer we can see what we are setting out to achieve, the more likely we are to achieve it. It’s exciting, thanks to dopamine. This is why the best visions offer us something that, for all practical purposes, we will never actually reach, but for which we would gladly die trying. Each point in our journey is an opportunity to feel like we’re making progress toward something bigger than ourselves.”


340. “Unless someone is willing to make personal sacrifices for the good of others to earn their place in the hierarchy, they aren’t really “alpha material.” Simply acting the part is not enough.”


341. “Leaders Eat Last” wants to change that paradigm.


342. “Responsibility is not doing as we are told, that's obedience. Responsibility is doing what is right.”


343. If our leaders are to enjoy the trappings of their position in the hierarchy, then we expect them to offer us protection. The problem is, for many of the overpaid leaders, we know that they took the money and perks and didn’t offer protection to their people. In some cases, they even sacrificed their people to protect or boost their own interests. This is what so viscerally offends us. We only accuse them of greed and excess when we feel they have violated the very definition. of what it means to be a leader.


344. “But when the conditions are more subtle, things like office politics, opportunism, occasional rounds of layoffs and a general lack of trust among colleagues, we adapt. Like being at base camp on Everest, we believe that we are fine and can cope. However, the fact remains that the human animal is not built for these conditions. Even though we may think we’re comfortable, the effects of the environment still take their toll. Just because we become accustomed, just because it becomes normal, doesn’t mean it’s acceptable. On Everest, even after we’ve adapted, if we spend too long on the mountain, our internal organs start to break down. In an unhealthy culture, it’s the same. Even though we can get used to living with stress and low, regular levels of cortisol in our bodies, that doesn’t mean we should. A constant flow of cortisol isn’t just bad for organizations. It can also do serious damage to our health. Like the other selfish chemicals, cortisol can help us survive, but it isn’t supposed to be in our system all the time. It wreaks havoc with our glucose metabolism. It also increases blood pressure and inflammatory responses and impairs cognitive ability. (It’s harder to concentrate on things outside the organization if we are stressed about what’s going on inside.) Cortisol increases aggression, suppresses our sex drive and generally leaves us feeling stressed out. And here’s the killer—literally. Cortisol prepares our bodies to react suddenly—to fight or run as circumstances demand. Because this takes a lot of energy, when we feel threatened, our bodies turn off nonessential functions, such as digestion and growth. Once the stress has passed, these systems are turned on again. Unfortunately, the immune system is one of the functions that the body deems nonessential, so it shuts down during cortisol bursts. In other words, if we work in environments in which trust is low, relationships are weak or transactional and stress and anxiety are normal, we become much more vulnerable to illness.”


345. “Our intelligence gives us ideas and instructions. But it is our ability to cooperate that actually helps us get those things done.”


346. The concept of shareholder value. Maximizing shareholder value has failed. People and customers are put second.


347. Costco, which treats employees like family.


348. We do not see any improvement to our bodies with day-to-day comparisons. I know of no case study in history that describes an organization that has been managed out of a crisis. Every single one of them was led.


349. “La empatía, como explica Johnny Bravo, es «un servicio segundo a segundo, minuto a minuto, que debemos a todo el mundo si queremos llamarnos líderes».”


350. -Always remember that you are the architect of the problem ahead of you. Do not be a victim of the situation.


351. Make your vision come alive stably and realistically, not in an expedient manner.


352. “Leaders Eat Last” by Simon Sinek is a book about how people have gone wrong in the ways of making themselves leaders. Simon Sinek tries to put in an urgent effort to make real leaders realize that they need to step forward to make a positive impact on the world.


353. “new culture of caring allowed the people and strategies to flourish.”


354. When it is required, leaders decide and determine to east last.


355. “For most of us, we have warmer feelings for the projects we worked on where everything seemed to go wrong. We remember how the group stayed at work until 3 a.m., ate cold pizza and barely made the deadline. Those are the experiences we remember as some of our best days at work. It was not because of the hardship, per se, but because the hardship was shared. It is not the work we remember with fondness, but the camaraderie, how the group came together to get things done. And the reason is, once again, natural. In an effort to get us to help one another during times of struggle, our bodies release oxytocin. In other words, when we share the hardship, we biologically grow closer.”


356. “AUGUST 5, 1981. That’s the date it became official. It’s rare that we can point to an exact date when a business theory or idea becomes an accepted practice. But in the case of mass layoffs, we can. August 5, 1981, was the day President Ronald Reagan fired more than 11,000 air traffic controllers.”


357. When you see how a person treats other people who do nothing for him, you get to know about the character of the person himself.


358. Not until those without information relinquish their control can an organization run better, smoother and faster and reach its maximum potential.


359. -Try being a parent who works late but is happy with the job than being someone who comes home early but is unhappy. This will affect your children.


360. Efforts do not give immediate results and neither are they easily measurable.


361. “In physics, the definition of power is the transfer of energy. We measure the power of a lightbulb in watts. The higher the wattage, the more electricity is transferred into light and heat and the more powerful the bulb. Organizations and their leaders operate exactly the same way. The more energy is transferred from the top of the organization to those who are actually doing the job, those who know more about what’s going on on a daily basis, the more powerful the organization and the more powerful the leader.”


362. “Nuestro éxito como especie no fue cuestión de suerte: nos lo ganamos. Trabajamos mucho para llegar a donde estamos hoy, y lo hicimos juntos. Estamos diseñados para trabajar juntos. En un nivel profundamente arraigado y biológico, somos máquinas sociales. Y cuando trabajamos para ayudarnos mutuamente, nuestros cuerpos nos recompensan por nuestro esfuerzo para que sigamos haciéndolo.”


363. Endorphins, which mask physical pain with pleasure


364. ― Simon Sinek, Los lideres comen al final


365. “There’s a growing body of evidence that the companies that are most successful at maximizing shareholder value over time are those that aim toward goals other than maximizing shareholder value,” Justin Fox and Jay Lorsch wrote in the July–August 2012 issue of the Harvard Business Review. “Employees and customers often know more about and have more of a long-term commitment to a company than shareholders do.”


366. “The leaders of great organizations do not see people as a commodity to be managed to help grow the money. They see the money as the commodity to be managed to help grow their people.”


367. “Being a leader is like being a parent, and the company is like a new family to join. One that will care for us like we are their own . . . in sickness and in health. And if we are successful, our people will take on our company’s name as a sign of the family to which they are loyal.”


368. If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.


369. “huge conference called BlogWorld? Why don’t they meet online? Because nothing can replace face-to-face meetings for social animals like us. A live concert is better than the DVD and going to a ball game feels different from watching on TV, even though the view is better on television. We like to actually be around people who are like us. It makes us feel like we belong. It is also the reason a video conference can never replace a business trip. Trust is not formed through a screen, it is formed across a table. It takes a handshake to bind humans . . . and no technology yet can replace that. There is no such thing as virtual trust.”


370. “La manera de conseguirlo es haciendo que la gente se sienta parte de un todo, ofreciéndoles una cultura sólida basada en un conjunto claro de valores humanos y creencias. Dándoles la capacidad de tomar decisiones, ofreciéndoles confianza y empatía; creando un Círculo de Seguridad. Al”


371. “Destructive Abundance happens when the players focus almost exclusively on the score and forget why they set out to play the game in the first place.”


372. “Los líderes de las mejores organizaciones no consideran a sus trabajadores un material que deben manipular para contribuir a ganar más dinero. Entienden que el dinero es el material que hay que gestionar para ayudar a su gente a crecer.”


373. “cuando los burócratas procuran sobre todo protegerse a sí mismos, el progreso se ralentiza y toda la organización se vuelve más susceptible a las amenazas y las presiones externas.”


374. -A great leader needs to assure that all his team members are confident and trained fine to act on their jobs.


375. Always remember that you are the architect of the problem ahead of you. Do not be a victim of the situation.


376. “It’s not how smart the people in the organization are; it’s how well they work together that is the true indicator of future success or the ability to manage through struggle.”


377. Follow the Leader - a Collection of the Best Lectures on Leadership. No ratings yet. View price on Amazon.com


378. “It is not the genius at the top giving directions that makes people great. It is great people that make the guy at the top look like a genius.”


379. 2011 study conducted by a team of social scientists at the University of Canberra in Australia concluded that having a job we hate is as bad for our health and sometimes worse than not having a job at all.


380. – When the environment at work is one of encouragement, and one that meets the basic human needs to live, to learn, to feel valued and significant, we do more than just survive — we thrive. We soar higher than expected. It’s the leadership’s responsibility to set up the right conditions/environment for this to happen. We do not have the power to “change people”. We must enhance the environment. “Change” —whether good or bad — is the result of environment. And if we want to see “change” — we need to focus less on ourselves and more on others/“the team”/organization/etc…


381. Energy and time, will be consumed when you are giving your best to be a leader.


382. – A core tenet of workplace management, human relations, leadership, and basically everything else in life, is that when we feel hopeless and devastated (like many of us do with our work situation) about some area of life, and we feel like we have no control, then the result is rarely positive (at least until we overcome it).


383. “The biggest thing the self-help industry seems to have helped is itself.”


384. “You can’t laugh and be afraid at the same time,” he said. And he’d be right. Laughing actually releases endorphins. They are released to mask the pain we’re causing to ourselves as our organs are being convulsed.”


385. Always remember that you are the architect of the problem ahead of you. Do not be a victim of the situation.


386. “Building trust requires nothing more than telling the truth.”


387. “the role of the leader is not to bark commands and be completely accountable for the success or failure of the mission. It is a leader’s job instead to take responsibility for the success of each member of his crew. It is the leader’s job to ensure that they are well trained and feel confident to perform their duties. To give them responsibility and hold them accountable to advance the mission.”


388. “This is what happens when the leaders of an organization listen to the people who work there. Without coercion, pressure or force, the people naturally work together to help each other and advance the company. Working with a sense of obligation is replaced by working with a sense of pride. And coming to work for the company is replaced by coming to work for each other. Work is no longer a place to dread. It is a place to feel valued.”


389. -All the components of trust are what leadership is all about: integrity, honesty, accountability.


390. “Marine leaders are expected to eat last because the true price of leadership is the willingness to place the needs of others above your own. Great leaders truly care about those they are privileged to lead and understand that the true cost of the leadership privilege comes at the expense of self-interest.”


391. “Teams led by a directive leader initially outperform those led by an empowering leader. However, despite lower early performance, teams led by an empowering leader experience higher performance improvement over time because of higher levels of team-learning, coordination, empowerment and mental model development.”


392. “Even though we can indeed raise our status with material goods, the feeling doesn’t last. There is no social relationship associated with that burst of serotonin. Again, the selfless chemicals are trying to help us strengthen our communities and social bonds. To find a lasting sense of pride, there must be a mentor/parent/boss/coach/leader relationship to back it up.”


393. “Returning from work feeling inspired, safe, fulfilled and grateful is a natural human right to which we are all entitled and not a modern luxury that only a few lucky ones are able to find.” ― Simon Sinek, Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t


394. Weak leadership and management can affect the morale of the people.


395. “The rank of office is not what makes someone a leader. Leadership is the choice to serve others with or without any formal rank. There are people with authority who are not leaders and there are people at the bottom rungs of an organization who most certainly are leaders.”


396. -Feeling stressed and anxious speaks more about management and leadership, not what work you are engaged in.


397. “The rank of office is not what makes someone a leader. Leadership is the choice to serve others with or without any formal rank.”


398. “Good leadership is like exercise. We do not see any improvement to our bodies with day-to-day comparisons. In fact, if we only compare the way our bodies look on a given day to how they looked the previous day, we would think our efforts had been wasted. It’s only when we compare pictures of ourselves over a period of weeks or months that we can see a stark difference. The impact of leadership is best judged over time”


399. “As President Ronald Reagan famously joked with the chief surgeon on March 30, 1981, as he was wheeled into the operating room at George Washington University Hospital, after being shot by John Hinckley Jr., “I hope you’re all Republicans.” (To which the surgeon, a self-described liberal Democrat, replied, “We’re all Republicans today, Mr. President.”)”


400. And when a leader embraces their responsibility to care for people instead of caring for numbers, then people will follow, solve problems and see to it that that leader’s vision comes to life the right way, a stable way and not the expedient way.


401. -The unsatisfied feeling you get after a long hard working day is not because of the amount of effort you put into it. It is because there is no balance between your hard work and the outcome.


402. “2011 study conducted by a team of social scientists at the University of Canberra in Australia concluded that having a job we hate is as bad for our health and sometimes worse than not having a job at all.”


403. “Leaders are the ones willing to look out for those to the left of them and those to the right of them. They are often willing to sacrifice their own comfort for ours, even when they disagree with us. Trust is not simply a matter of shared opinions. Trust is a biological reaction to the belief that someone has our well-being at heart. Leaders are the ones who are willing to give up something of their own for us. Their time, their energy, their money, maybe even the food off their plate. When”


404. “This is the basis of what Chapman calls truly human leadership. When the people have to manage dangers from inside the organization, the organization itself becomes less able to face the dangers from outside.”


405. -Your commitment to people is a major part of leadership.


406. “In time, as if by magic, we will realize that we have developed a deep bond with this person. The madness and excitement and spontaneity of the dopamine hit is replaced by a more relaxed, more stable, more long-term oxytocin-driven relationship. A vastly more valuable state if we have to rely on someone to help us do things and protect us when we’re weak. My favorite definition of love is giving someone the power to destroy us and trusting they won’t use it.”


407. “Leadership, true leadership, is not the bastion of those who sit at the top. It is the responsibility of anyone who belongs to the group. Though those with formal rank may have authority to work at greater scale, each of us has a responsibility to keep the Circle of Safety strong. We must all start today to do little things for the good of others … one day at a time. Let us all be the leaders we wish we had.”


408. “As employees or members of the group, we need the courage to take care of each other when our leaders don’t. And in doing so, we become the leaders we wish we had.”


409. Oxytocin is responsible for the feeling of love, friendship and deep trust. Oxytocin is also contagious.


410. “Leaders East Last” deals with the ethics, morality, and responsibilities of leadership.


411. “Cigarettes are out. Social media is in. It’s the drug of the twenty-first century. (At least people who smoke stand outside together.)”


412. Being a great leader means you have to face the danger first, totally unknown to what’s coming.


413. “When we don’t have a sense of belonging, we wear a T-shirt stamped with the company logo to sleep in or while painting the house. When we have a sense of belonging, however, we wear the company schwag in public and with pride.”


414. “It turns out, even when offered big titles and bigger salaries, people would rather work at a place in which they feel like they belong. People would rather feel safe among their colleagues, have the opportunity to grow and feel a part of something bigger than themselves than work in a place that simply makes them rich.”


415. “As social animals, it is imperative for us to see the actual, tangible impact of our time and effort for our work to have meaning and for us to be motivated to do it even better. The logic seems to follow Milgram’s findings, except in this case, it’s positive. When we are able to physically see the positive impact of the decisions we make or the work we do, not only do we feel that our work was worth it, but it also inspires us to work harder and do more.”


416. Those who have an opportunity to work in organizations that treat them like human beings to be protected rather than a resource to be exploited come home at the end of the day with an intense feeling of fulfillment and gratitude. This should be the rule for all of us, not the exception. Returning from work feeling inspired, safe, fulfilled and grateful is a natural human right to which we are all entitled and not a modern luxury that only a few lucky ones are able to find.


417. -Weak leadership and management can affect the morale of the people.


418. “the will to succeed and the desire to do things that advance the interests of the organization aren’t just motivated by recognition from above; they are integral to a culture of sacrifice and service, in which protection comes from all levels of the organization.”


419. “If Marines told to obey their officer suspect for a second that the officer would avoid the truth or not take responsibility for their actions, simply to cover their own tail or make themselves look better, then the Circle of Safety shrinks and the entire fabric and efficacy of the group of Marines decays. The Marines are as good as they are not simply because they are big, strong and fearless. They are also good at what they do because they trust each other and believe, without a doubt, that the Marine to the left of them and the Marine to the right of them, regardless of rank, will do what needs to be done. This is the reason Marines are so effective as a group.”


420. “The goal of a leader is to give no orders,” Captain Marquet explains. “Leaders are to provide direction and intent and allow others to figure out what to do and how to get there.” And this is the challenge most organizations face. “We train people to comply, not to think,” Captain Marquet goes on. If people only comply, we can’t expect people to take responsibility for their actions. The chain of command is for orders, not information. Responsibility is not doing as we are told, that’s obedience. Responsibility is doing what is right.”


421. “the bigger the goal, the more effort it requires, the more dopamine we get. This is why it feels really good to work hard to accomplish something difficult, while doing something quick and easy may only give us a little hit if anything at all. In other words, it feels good to put in a lot of effort to accomplish something. There is no biological incentive to do nothing.”


422. “A good number of our educational institutions and training programs today are focused not on developing great leaders, but on training effective managers. Short-term gains are viewed as the mark of success and long-term organizational growth and viability are simply the bill payers. Leaders Eat Last is an effort to change this paradigm. [Sinek’s] vision is simple: to create a new generation of men and women who understand that an organization’s success or failure is based on leadership excellence and not managerial acumen.”


423. Leaders should serve employees first and they will then serve the organization’s customers and stakeholders


424. Our brains are wired to release oxytocin when in the presence of our tribe and cortisol, the chemical that produces the feeling of anxiety, when we feel vulnerable and alone (Page 50). When we’re in a healthy work or home environment, oxytocin is released, the chemical that makes us feel loved and appreciated. When we’re in a toxic environment, cortisol is released, which is harmful to our body over the long-term.


425. “Leadership is about integrity, honesty and accountability. All components of trust.”


426. “is a given that profit is the goal of any business, but to suggest it is the primary responsibility of a business is misguided. It is the leaders of companies that see profit as fuel for their cultures that will outlast their dopamine-addicted, cortisol-soaked competitors.”


427. -Do not take the profit out of a rank you are in. Always think about the good of the people around you.


428. “Building trust requires nothing more than telling”


429. “If”


430. “Integrity is when our words and deeds are consistent with our intentions.”


431. “Good leadership is like exercise. We do not see any improvement to our bodies with day-to-day comparisons.”


432. “Few if any of the alcoholics enrolled in AA will find sobriety until they complete Step Twelve. Even if they make it through all the other eleven steps, those who do not complete Step Twelve are very likely to drink again. It is those who complete Step Twelve who overcome the addiction.


433. “Weak leaders are the ones who extend the benefits of the Circle of Safety only to their fellow senior executives and a chosen few others. They look out for each other, but they do not offer the same considerations to those outside their “inner circle.” Without the protection of our leaders, everyone outside the inner circle is forced to work alone or in small tribes to protect and advance their own interests. And in so doing, silos form, politics entrench, mistakes are covered up instead of exposed, the spread of information slows and unease soon replaces any sense of cooperation and security.”


434. August 5, 1981. That’s the date it became official. It’s rare that we can point to an exact date when a business theory or idea becomes an accepted practice. But in the case of mass layoffs, we can. August 5, 1981, was the day President Ronald Reagan fired more than 11,000 air traffic controllers.


435. “The time we spend getting to know people when we’re not working is part of what it takes to form bonds of trust. It’s the exact same reason why eating together and doing things as a family really matters. Equally as important are conferences, company picnics and the time we spend around the watercooler. The more familiar we are with each other, the stronger our bonds. Social interaction is also important for the leaders of an organization. Roaming the halls of the office and engaging with people beyond meetings really matters.”


436. “Before there was empathy at the company, going to work felt like, well, work.”


437. “What too many leaders of organizations fail to appreciate is that it’s not the people that are the problem. The people are fine. Rather, it’s the environment in which the people operate that is the problem. Get that right and things just go.”


438. “leadership reduces the threats people feel inside the group, which frees them up to focus more time and energy to protect the organization from the constant dangers outside and seize the big opportunities.”


439. “Goethe, the great nineteenth-century thinker, reportedly summed up, “You can easily judge the character of a man by how he treats those who can do nothing for him.”


440. “As long as there are human beings brought together for a common cause, leaders can choose to set any kind of culture they want.”


441. “la capacidad de inducir a las personas, mediante su crecimiento, a hacer lo que haga falta es lo que crea un éxito estable y duradero.”


442. When your teammates feel safe around you, they will start doing things that are right for the organization and things that will help your vision be executed.


443. “Letting someone into an organization is like adopting a child.”


444. “Weak leaders are the ones who only extend the benefits of the Circle of Safety to their fellow senior executives and a chosen few others. They look out for each other, but they do not offer the same considerations to those outside their “inner circle.” Without the protection of our leaders, everyone outside the inner circle is forced to work alone or in small tribes to protect and advance their own interests. And in so doing, silos form, politics entrench, mistakes are covered up instead of exposed, the spread of information slows and unease soon replaces any sense of cooperation and security.”


445. “Whereas money has relative value ($100 to a college student is a lot, $100 to a millionaire is a little), time and effort have an absolute value.”


446. “Whether the danger is real or imagined, the stress we feel is real. Unlike our rational minds, our bodies do not try to assess what the danger is. We simply react to the chemicals flowing through our bloodstreams to prepare us for what might be lurking.”


447. “The Paradox of Being Human HUMAN BEINGS EXIST as individuals and as members of groups at all times. I am one and I am one of many . . . always. This also creates some inherent conflicts of interest. When we make decisions, we must weigh the benefits to us personally against the benefits to our tribe or collective. Quite often, what’s good for one is not necessarily good for the other. Working exclusively to advance ourselves may hurt the group, while working exclusively to advance the group may come at a cost to us as individuals.”


448. “John Quincy Adams would have understood Simon’s message because he clearly understood what it was to be a leader when he stated: “If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.”


449. “Misery may love company, but it is the companies that love misery that suffer the most.”


450. “Leadership, true leadership, is not the bastion of those who sit at the top. It is the responsibility of anyone who belongs to the group.”


451. “the true price of leadership is the willingness to place the needs of others above your own. Great leaders truly care about those they are privileged to lead and understand that the true cost of the leadership privilege comes at the expense of self-interest.”


452. “And it’s not just time. The energy we give also matters. If a parent goes to watch their kid’s soccer game but looks up from their mobile device only when there is cheering, they may have given their time, but they haven’t given their energy. The kid will look over to see their parent’s head down most of the game, busy texting or e-mailing the office or something.”


453. “Stress and anxiety at work have less to do with the work we do and more to do with weak management and leadership.” ― Simon Sinek, Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t


454. “This is an important point. We cannot tell people to trust us. We cannot instruct people to come up with big ideas. And we certainly can’t demand that people cooperate. These are always results—the results of feeling safe and trusted among the people with whom we work.”


455. “A 2011 study conducted by a team of social scientists at the University of Canberra in Australia concluded that having a job we hate is as bad for our health and sometimes worse than not having a job at all.”


456. Serotonin, the leadership chemical, is the feeling of pride we get when we feel that others like or respect us.


457. “Leaders are the ones who run headfirst into the unknown. They rush toward the danger. They put their own interests aside to protect us or to pull us into the future. Leaders would sooner sacrifice what is theirs to save what is ours. And they would never sacrifice what is ours to save what is theirs. This is what it means to be a leader. It means they choose to go first into danger, headfirst toward the unknown. And when we feel sure they will keep us safe, we will march behind them and work tirelessly to see their visions come to life and proudly call ourselves their followers.”


458. “Like the Spartans, we will have to learn that our strength will come not from the sharpness of our spears but from our willingness to offer others the protection of our shields.”


459. – When the environment at work is one of encouragement, and one that meets the basic human needs to live, to learn, to feel valued and significant, we do more than just survive — we thrive. We soar higher than expected. It’s the leadership’s responsibility to set up the right conditions/environment for this to happen. We do not have the power to “change people”. We must enhance the environment. “Change” —whether good or bad — is the result of environment. And if we want to see “change” — we need to focus less on ourselves and more on others/“the team”/organization/etc…


460. Always try to understand the real meaning of leadership privilege which arrives at the cost of self-interest.


461. ― Simon Sinek, Leaders Eat Last


462. “The more we give of ourselves to see others succeed, the greater our value to the group and the more respect they offer us. The more respect and recognition we receive, the higher our status in the group and the more incentive we have to continue to give to the group. At least that’s how it’s supposed to work. Whether we are a boss, coach or parent, serotonin is working to encourage us to serve those for whom we are directly responsible. And if we are the employee, player or the one being looked after, the serotonin encourages us to work hard to make them proud.”


463. -Leadership does not mean assigning work to the team and sitting and doing less than before. It means you have to start doing more and manage the whole team.


464. Always do a job that you love so that when you return home after a long day, you feel inspired, fulfilled, grateful and safe, not stressed.


465. “Inside a Circle of Safety, when people trust and share their successes and failures, what they know and what they don’t know, the result is innovation. It’s just natural.”


466. Feeling stressed and anxious speaks more about management and leadership, not what work you are engaged in.


467. “There are fates worse than death,” he will tell you. “One fate worse than death is accidentally killing your own men. Another fate worse than death is going home alive when twenty-two others don’t.”


468. “They can even end up pitting coworkers against one another, accidentally promoting behaviors that undermine the progress of the group as a whole. One of my favorite examples comes from the heady days of America Online (AOL). The company would routinely send out CDs in an attempt to get people to sign up for its product. One group within the company, responsible for acquisitions, was given financial incentives for hitting subscription goals. And so all tactics were designed to do just that: sign people up. There were offers of 100 free hours in the first month, which became 250 free hours, then even 700 hours. I remember when the offer got to 1,000 free hours, as long as they were used in the first 45 days (which left 1.7 hours of sleep per night for anyone who could take advantage of the promotion). It worked. Whatever tactics the acquisition group members developed were designed to do one thing and one thing only—maximize their bonus. The problem was there was another group responsible for retention; they had to find ways to get all the people who had canceled their subscriptions to come back. By creating a system in which each group was preoccupied with its own metrics without concern for anyone else’s or even what would serve the company best, the leaders of AOL had effectively incentivized their people to find ways to cost the company more money.”


469. -Being a great leader means you have to face the danger first, totally unknown to what’s coming.


470. “Cooperation doesn’t mean agreement, it means working together to advance the greater good, to serve those who rely on our protection, not to rack up wins to serve the party or ourselves.”


471. “Truly human leadership protects an organization from the internal rivalries that can shatter a culture. When we have to protect ourselves from each other, the whole organization suffers.”


472. “The strength of the culture, and not its size or resources, determines an organization’s ability to adapt to the times, overcome adversity and pioneer new innovations.”


473. “All the perks, all the benefits and advantages you may get for the rank or position you hold, they aren’t meant for you. They are meant for the role you fill. And when you leave your role, which eventually you will, they will give the ceramic cup to the person who replaces you. Because you only ever deserved a Styrofoam cup.”


474. Your rank in your office does not make you a leader. The way you work with others and handle situations speaks about the kind of leader that you are.


475. A great leader needs to assure that all his team members are confident and trained fine to act on their jobs.