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750 Best Quotes From Atomic Habits By James Clear (2023)

1. “Make the cue, routine, and reward so automatic that you don’t even have to think about it.”


2. “The process of behavior change always starts with awareness.”


3. THE 1ST LAW: Make It Obvious


4. True long-term thinking is goal-less thinking. It’s not about any single accomplishment. It is about the cycle of endless refinement and continuous improvement. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


5. Decide the type of person you want to be. Prove it to yourself with small wins.»


6. “For most of my young life, being an athlete was a major part of my identity. After my baseball career ended, I struggled to find myself. When you spend your whole life defining yourself in one way and that disappears, who are you now?”


7. “Most days, we’d rather be wrong with the crowd than be right by ourselves.”


8. “When scientists analyze people who appear to have tremendous self-control, it turns out those individuals aren't all that different from those who are struggling. Instead, 'disciplined' people are better at structuring their lives in a way that does not require heroic willpower and self-control. In other words, they spend less time in tempting situations. The people with the best self-control are typically the ones who need to use it the least. It's easier to practice self-restraint when you don't have to use it very often.”


9. What you crave is not the habit itself but the change in state it delivers.»


10. “We are so focused on figuring out the best approach that we never get around to taking action.”


11. “Quite literally, you become your habits.”


12. “Watching television makes you feel sluggish, so you watch more television because you don’t have the energy to do anything else.”


13. “Habits are the compound interest of self-development. The same way that money multiplies through compound interest, the effects of your habits multiply as you repeat them. They seem to make little difference on any given day and yet the impact they deliver over the months and years can be enormous. It is only when looking back, two, five, or perhaps ten years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones become strikingly apparent.”


14. The task of building a good habit is like cultivating a delicate flower one day at a time. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


15. “Some of our underlying motives include:fn1 ■ Conserve energy ■ Obtain food and water ■ Find love and reproduce ■ Connect and bond with others ■ Win social acceptance and approval ■ Reduce uncertainty ■ Achieve status and prestige”


16. “Your habits are modern-day solutions to ancient desires. The underlying motives behind human behavior remains the same.”


17. The purpose of setting goals is to win the game. The purpose of building systems is to continue playing the game.»


18. “A more reliable approach is to cut bad habits off at the source. One of the most practical ways to eliminate a bad habit is to reduce exposure to the cue that causes it.”


19. “This process, known as Pointing-and-Calling, is a safety system designed to reduce mistakes. It seems silly, but it works incredibly well. Pointing-and-Calling reduces errors by up to 85 percent and cuts accidents by 30 percent. The MTA subway system in New York City adopted a modified version that is “point-only,” and “within two years of implementation, incidents of incorrectly berthed subways fell 57 percent.”


20. “Your culture sets your expectation for what is “normal.” Surround yourself with people who have the habits you want to have yourself.”


21. “Al final obtienes lo que repites.”


22. “Every action you take is a vote for the type of person you wish to become.”


23. “The most practical thing a human being can do is to elevate their beliefs.”


24. “No matter how you use this strategy, the secret to creating a successful habit stack is selecting the right cue to kick things off. Unlike an implementation intention, which specifically states the time and location for a given behavior, habit stacking implicitly has the time and location built into it.”


25. “It is the anticipation of a reward—not the fulfillment of it—that gets us to take action. The greater the anticipation, the greater the dopamine spike.”


26. “Redesign your life so the actions that matter most are also the actions that are easiest to do.”


27. “Whenever you want to change your behavior, you can simply ask yourself: How can I make it obvious? How can I make it attractive? How can I make it easy? How can I make it satisfying?”


28. When you can’t win by being better, you can win by being different.»


29. If you want to master a habit, the key is to start with repetition, not perfection.»


30. “True behavior change is identity change. You might start a habit because of motivation, but the only reason you'll stick with one is that it becomes part of your identity.”


31. The costs of your good habits are in the present. The costs of your bad habits are in the future. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


32. “Habits are the compound interest of self-improvement”


33. “The more immediate the pain, the less likely the behavior. If you want to prevent bad habits and eliminate unhealthy behaviors, then adding an instant cost to the action is a great way to reduce their odds. We repeat bad habits because they serve us in some way, and that makes them hard to abandon. The best way I know to overcome this predicament is to increase the speed of the punishment associated with the behavior. There can’t be a gap between the action and the consequences.”


34. “Temptation bundling is one way to make your habits more attractive. The strategy is to pair an action you want to do with an action you need to do.”


35. “goal is not to read a book, the goal is to become a reader.”


36. “Many people think they lack motivation when what they really lack is clarity. It is not always obvious when and where to take action. Some people spend their entire lives waiting for the time to be right to make an improvement.”


37. “A goal is a specific objective that you either achieve or don’t. A system is something you do on a regular basis that increases your odds of happiness in the long run.”


38. “Anyone can listen. All you have to do is stop talking.


39. “What you really want is the outcome the habit delivers.”


40. “Environment design allows you to take back control and become the architect of your life.”


41. With outcome-based habits, the focus is on what you want to achieve. With identity-based habits, the focus is on who you wish to become. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


42. You should be far more concerned with your current trajectory than with your current results.»


43. “Once a habit has been encoded, the urge to act follows whenever the environmental cues reappear. This is one reason behavior change techniques can backfire. Shaming obese people with weight-loss presentations can make them feel stressed, and as a result many people return to their favorite coping strategy: overeating. Showing pictures of blackened lungs to smokers leads to higher levels of anxiety, which drives many people to reach for a cigarette. If you’re not careful about cues, you can cause the very behavior you want to stop.”


44. “Most people live in a world others have created for them.”


45. “Sometimes a habit will be hard to remember and you’ll need to make it obvious. Other times you won’t feel like starting and you’ll need to make it attractive. In many cases, you may find that a habit will be too difficult and you’ll need to make it easy. And sometimes, you won’t feel like sticking with it and you’ll need to make it satisfying.”


46. “When scientists analyze people who appear to have tremendous self-control, it turns out those individuals aren't all that different from those who are struggling. Instead, "disciplined" people are better at structuring their lives in a way that does not require heroic willpower and self-control.”


47. “I refer to this as the difference between being in motion and taking action. The two ideas sound similar, but they’re not the same. When you’re in motion, you’re planning and strategizing and learning. Those are all good things, but they don’t produce a result.”


48. “La fórmula de la estrategia de acumulación de hábitos es: «Después de [HÁBITO ACTUAL],


49. The human brain loves a challenge, but only if it is within an optimal zone of difficulty.»


50. “Becoming an Early Riser Phase 1: Be home by 10 p.m. every night. Phase 2: Have all devices (TV, phone, etc.) turned off by 10 p.m. every night. Phase 3: Be in bed by 10 p.m. every night (reading a book, talking with your partner). Phase 4: Lights off by 10 p.m. every night. Phase 5: Wake up at 6 a.m. every day.”


51. “Your identity emerges out of your habits. Every action is a vote for the type of person you wish to become. Becoming the best version of yourself requires you to continuously edit your beliefs, and to upgrade and expand your identity. The real reason habits matter is not because they can get you better results (although they can do that), but because they can change your beliefs about yourself.”


52. “Many people think they lack motivation but what they really lack is clarity.”


53. “Small wins are the building blocks of a successful life.”


54. “One of the deepest human desires is to belong. And this ancient preference exerts a powerful influence on our modern behaviour.”


55. “The 1st Law of Behavior Change is make it obvious. ■ The two most common cues are time and location. ■ Creating an implementation intention is a strategy you can use to pair a new habit with a specific time and location. ■ The implementation intention formula is: I will [BEHAVIOR] at [TIME] in [LOCATION]. ■ Habit stacking is a strategy you can use to pair a new habit with a current habit. ■ The habit stacking formula is: After [CURRENT HABIT], I will [NEW HABIT].”


56. “Achieving a goal only changes your life for the moment. That’s the counterintuitive thing about improvement. We think we need to change our results, but the results are not the problem. What we really need to change are the systems that cause those results. When you solve problems at the results level, you only solve them temporarily. In order to improve for good, you need to solve problems at the systems level. Fix the inputs and the outputs will fix themselves.”


57. Your actions reveal how badly you want something. If you keep saying something is a priority but you never act on it, then you don’t really want it. It’s time to have an honest conversation with yourself. Your actions reveal your true motivations. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


58. “If you’re going to rely on punishment to change behavior, then the strength of the punishment must match the relative strength of the behavior it is trying to correct. To be productive, the cost of procrastination must be greater than the cost of action. To be healthy, the cost of laziness must be greater than the cost of exercise.”


59. “Prove it to yourself with small wins.”


60. In fact, the tendency for one purchase to lead to another one has a name: the Diderot Effect. The Diderot Effect states that obtaining a new possession often creates a spiral of consumption that leads to additional purchases.»


61. “Small habits can make a meaningful difference by providing evidence of a new identity.”


62. “The lone wolf dies, but the pack survives.”fn1”


63. As a general rule, the more immediate pleasure you get from an action, the more strongly you should question whether it aligns with your long-term goals.»


64. “When I started my career as an entrepreneur, I would often work from my couch or at the kitchen table. In the evenings, I found it very difficult to stop working. There was no clear division between the end of work time and the beginning of personal time. Was the kitchen table my office or the space where I ate meals? Was the couch where I relaxed or where I sent emails? Everything happened in the same place.”


65. “A chain of habits is only as strong as its weakest link.”


66. “Habits are, simply, reliable solutions to recurring problems in our environment.”


67. “Our genes do not eliminate the need for hard work. They clarify it. They tell us what to work hard on.”


68. Goals are good for setting a direction, but systems are best for making progress. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


69. “Todos tenemos metas que nos gustaría lograr y sueños que queremos cumplir, pero sin importar en qué estás tratando de ser mejor, si solo te esfuerzas y haces el trabajo cuando te resulta conveniente y emocionante, entonces nunca serás lo suficientemente consistente como para alcanzar resultados destacados.”


70. “Life feels reactive, but it is actually predictive. All day long, you are making your best guess of how to act given what you’ve just seen and what has worked for you in the past.”


71. Our habits are not solely determined by our personalities, but there is no doubt that our genes nudge us in a certain direction. Our deeply rooted preferences make certain behaviors easier for some people than for others. You don’t have to apologize for these differences or feel guilty about them, but you do have to work with them.»


72. “You don’t have to build the habits everyone tells you to build. Choose the habit that best suits you, not the one that is most popular.”


73. “Reframing your habits to highlight their benefits rather than their drawbacks is a fast and lightweight way to reprogram your mind to make a habit more attractive.”


74. “Boiling water will soften a potato but harden an egg. You cant control whether you're a potato or an egg, but you can decide to play a game where it's better to be hard or soft. If you can find a more favorable environment, you can transform the situation from one where the odds are against you to one where they are in your favor. p226”


75. “This is the meaning of the phrase atomic habits—a regular practice or routine that is not only small and easy to do, but also the source of incredible power; a component of the system of compound growth.”


76. “Problem #2: Achieving a goal is only a momentary change.”


77. “Every action you take is a vote for the person you wish to become.”


78. Making it satisfying


79. “Behavior is a function of the Person in their Environment, or B = f (P,E).3”


80. “You don’t have to be the victim of your environment. You can also be the architect of it.”


81. “Your habits shape your identity and your identity shapes your habits.”


82. “When a measure becomes a target, it ceases to be a good measure.” Measurement is only useful when it guides you and adds context to a larger picture, not when it consumes you. Each number is simply one piece of feedback in the overall system.”


83. Success is the product of daily habits—not once-in-a-lifetime transformations. — James Clear /Atomic Habits


84. “True behavior change is identity change. You might start a habit because of motivation, but the only reason you’ll stick with one is that it becomes part of your identity.”


85. “Are you reading books and learning something new each day? Tiny battles like these are the ones that will define your future self.”


86. “With outcome-based habits, the focus is on what you want to achieve. With identity-based habits, the focus is on who you wish to become.”


87. “What was truly fascinating was that half of the people in the room had managed to quit smoking. Mike had been smoke-free for a few years at that point, and he swore up and down that he broke the habit because of a book called Allen Carr’s Easy Way to Stop Smoking.”


88. “It’s hard to change your habits if you never change the underlying beliefs that led to your past behavior. You have a new goal and a new plan, but you haven’t changed who you are.”


89. “Instead, “disciplined” people are better at structuring their lives in a way that does not require heroic willpower and self-control.”


90. …once you’ve started doing the right thing, it is much easier to continue doing it.»


91. “Being motivated and curious counts for more than being smart because it leads to action.”


92. “The more pride you have in a particular aspect of your identity, the more motivated you will be to maintain the habits associated with it. If you’re proud of how your hair looks, you’ll develop all sorts of habits to care for and maintain it. If you’re proud of the size of your biceps, you’ll make sure you never skip an upper-body workout. If you’re proud of the scarves you knit, you’ll be more likely to spend hours knitting each week. Once your pride gets involved, you’ll fight tooth and nail to maintain your habits.”


93. One of the most effective things you can do to build better habits is to join a culture where your desired behavior is the normal behavior. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


94. “Tiny changes. Remarkable results.”


95. “Now for the interesting question: If you completely ignored your goals and focused only on your system, would you still succeed? For example, if you were a basketball coach and you ignored your goal to win a championship and focused only on what your team does at practice each day, would you still get results? I think you would.”


96. You value the present more than the future.»


97. “Until you make the unconscious conscious, it will direct your life and you will call it fate.”9”


98. “the things you do often creates the things you believe”


99. “True long-term thinking is goal-less thinking. It’s not about any single accomplishment. It is about the cycle of endless refinement and continuous improvement. Ultimately, it is your commitment to the process that will determine your progress.”


100. “The process of habit formation begins with trial and error.”


101. “A habit is a routine or behaviour that is performed regularly and, in many cases, automatically.”


102. “Focus on whether you are fulfilling your own potential than comparing yourself to someone else. The fact that you have a natural limit to any specific ability has nothing too do with whether you are reaching the ceiling of your capabilities. People get so caught up in the fact that they have limits that they rarely exert the effort required to get close to them.


103. “Success is not a goal to reach or a finish line to cross. It is a system to improve, an endless process to refine.”


104. “never miss twice.”


105. “Habit tracking provides visual proof that you are casting votes for the type of person you wish to become, which is a delightful form of immediate and intrinsic gratification.”


106. “Habits thrive under predictable circumstances like these.”


107. “In any election, there are going to be votes for both sides. You don’t need a unanimous vote to win an election; you just need a majority. It doesn’t matter if you cast a few votes for a bad behavior or an unproductive habit. Your goal is simply to win the majority of the time.”


108. “Success is a product of daily habits – not once-in-a-lifetime transformations.”


109. “Identity sustains a habit.”


110. “A SYSTEM OF ATOMIC HABITS”


111. “At some point, success in nearly every field requires you to ignore an immediate reward in favor of a delayed reward.”


112. “Cravings are the second step, and they are the motivational force”


113. “Your behaviors are usually a reflection of your identity.”


114. “People think I work hard but I’m actually really lazy. I’m just proactively lazy. It gives you so much time back.”


115. “the two most common cues are time and location. Implementation intentions leverage both of these cues.”


116. “Another woman I came across in my research was a former preschool teacher who had switched to a corporate job. Even though she was now working with adults, her old habits would kick in and she kept asking coworkers if they had washed their hands after going to the bathroom.”


117. “Conventional wisdom holds that motivation is the key to habit change. Maybe if you really wanted it, you’d actually do it. But the truth is, our real motivation is to be lazy and to do what is convenient.”


118. “Behavior that is incongruent with the self will not last. You may want more money, but if your identity is someone who consumes rather than creates, then you’ll continue to be pulled toward spending rather than earning.”


119. “Identity is the north star of habit change.”


120. “At some point it comes down to who can handle the boredom of training every day, doing the same lifts over and over and over.”


121. Changes that seem small and unimportant at first will compound and turn into remarkable results if you’re willing to stick with them for years. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


122. “Every day, there are a handful of moments that deliver an outsized impact. I refer to these little choices as decisive moments. The moment you decide between ordering takeout or cooking dinner. The moment you choose between driving your car or riding your bike. The moment you decide between starting your homework or grabbing the video game controller. These choices are a fork in the road.”


123. “If you want better results, then forget about setting goals. Focus on your system instead.”


124. “las metas son los resultados que quieres obtener. Los sistemas son los procesos que sigues para alcanzar esos resultados.”


125. “Whenever you feel authentic and genuine, you are headed in the right direction.”


126. “Of course, it works the opposite way, too. Every time you choose to perform a bad habit, it’s a vote for that identity. The good news is that you don’t need to be perfect. In any election, there are going to be votes for both sides. You don’t need a unanimous vote to win an election; you just need a majority”


127. “Progress requires unlearning. Becoming the best version of yourself requires you to continuously edit your beliefs, and to upgrade and expand your identity.”


128. Goals are about the results you want to achieve. Systems are about the processes that lead to those results.»


129. “If motion doesn’t lead to results, why do we do it? Sometimes we do it because we actually need to plan or learn more. But more often than not, we do it because motion allows us to feel like we’re making progress without running the risk of failure.”


130. “The cue is about noticing the reward. The craving is about wanting the reward. The response is about obtaining the reward.”


131. “Each habit is like a suggestion, ‘Hey maybe this is who I am.’”


132. “it doesn’t matter how successful or unsuccessful you are right now. What matters is whether your habits are putting you on the path toward success. You should be far more concerned with your current trajectory than with your current results.”


133. “Naval Ravikant says, “The trick to doing anything is first cultivating a desire for it.”


134. “Reflection and review enables the long-term improvement of all habits because it makes you aware of your mistakes and helps you consider possible paths for improvement. Without reflection, we can make excuses, create rationalizations, and lie to ourselves. We have no process for determining whether we are performing better or worse compared to yesterday.”


135. “If you find yourself struggling to build a good habit or break a bad one, it is not because you have lost your ability to improve.”


136. “To build better habits, you need to join a culture where that habit is normal.”


137. “Just because you can measure something doesn’t mean it’s the most important thing.”


138. “when we repeat 1 percent errors, day after day, by replicating poor decisions, duplicating tiny mistakes, and rationalizing little excuses, our small choices compound into toxic results. It’s the accumulation of many missteps”


139. “The thoughts, feelings, and emotions of the observer are what transform a cue into a craving.”


140. “Surround yourself with people who have the habits you want to have yourself. You’ll rise together.”


141. “Being curious is better than being smart. Being motivated and curious counts for more than being smart because it leads to action. Being smart will never deliver results on its own because it doesn’t get you to act. It is desire, not intelligence, that prompts behavior.”


142. A commitment device is a choice you make in the present that controls your actions in the future. It is a way to lock in future behavior, bind you to good habits, and restrict you from bad ones.»


143. “The response is the actual habit you perform,”


144. “Habits are easier to perform, and more satisfying to stick with, when they align with your natural inclinations and abilities.”


145. “How to Break a Bad Habit Inversion of the 1st law (Cue): Make it invisible. Inversion of the 2nd law (Craving): Make it unattractive. Inversion of the 3rd law (Response): Make it difficult. Inversion of the 4th law (Reward): Make it unsatisfying.”


146. “Similarly, one study found that the higher your best friend’s IQ at age eleven or twelve, the higher your IQ would be at age fifteen, even after controlling for natural levels of intelligence. We soak up the qualities and practices of those around us.”


147. …a small change in what you see can lead to a big shift in what you do»


148. Your outcomes are a lagging measure of your habits. Your net worth is a lagging measure of your financial habits. Your weight is a lagging measure of your eating habits. Your knowledge is a lagging measure of your learning habits. Your clutter is a lagging measure of your cleaning habits. You get what you repeat.»


149. Agreeableness: friendly and compassionate to challenging and detached.


150. Becoming the type of person you want to become — someone who lives by a stronger standard, someone who believes in themselves, someone who can be counted on by the people that matter to them — is about the daily process you follow and not the ultimate product you achieve. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


151. “Our feelings and emotions tell us whether to hold steady in our current state or to make a change. They help us decide the best course of action. Neurologists have discovered that when emotions and feelings are impaired, we actually lose the ability to make decisions. We have no signal of what to pursue and what to avoid. As the neuroscientist Antonio Damasio explains, “It is emotion that allows you to mark things as good, bad, or indifferent.”


152. If you find yourself struggling to build a good habit or break a bad one, it is not because you have lost your ability to improve. It is often because you have not yet crossed the Plateau of Latent Potential.»


153. It is worth noting that it is important to select short-term rewards that reinforce your identity rather than ones that conflict with it.»


154. “His mantra was “A genius is not born, but is educated and trained.”


155. “the tendency for one purchase to lead to another one has a name: the Diderot Effect. The Diderot Effect states that obtaining a new possession often creates a spiral of consumption that leads to additional purchases.”


156. “Professionals stick to the schedule; amateurs let life get in the way. Professionals know what is important to them and work toward it with purpose; amateurs get pulled off course by the urgencies of life.”


157. Improving by 1% isn’t particularly notable, sometimes it isn’t even noticeable – but it can be far more meaningful, especially in the long run. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


158. If you want to predict where you’ll end up in life, all you have to do is follow the curve of tiny gains or tiny losses, and see how your daily choices will compound ten or twenty years down the line. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


159. “Happiness is simply the absence of desire.”


160. “The ultimate form of intrinsic motivation is when a habit becomes part of your identity. It’s one thing to say I’m the type of person who wants this. It’s something very different to say I’m the type of person who is this.”


161. Becoming the best version of yourself requires you to continuously edit your beliefs, and to upgrade and expand your identity. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


162. “a response occurs depends on how motivated you are and how much friction is associated with”


163. “I worked hard with honesty, persistence, and long haul. I have now reached the ultimate stage of life where I take my advice from the book.”


164. “You do not rise to the level of your goals. You fall to the level of your systems”


165. Our behavior is not defined by the objects in the environment but by our relationship to them. In fact, this is a useful way to think about the influence of the environment on your behavior. Stop thinking about your environment as filled with objects. Start thinking about it as filled with relationships.»


166. “Primero decide quién quieres ser. Esto se aplica a cualquier nivel —para un individuo, para un equipo, para una comunidad, para un país—. ¿Qué deseas representar? ¿Qué tipo de principios y valores quieres defender? ¿En quién quieres convertirte? Estas”


167. “But when we repeat 1 percent errors, day after day, by replicating poor decisions, duplicating tiny mistakes, and rationalizing little excuses, our small choices compound into toxic results. It’s the accumulation of many missteps—a 1 percent decline here and there—that eventually leads to a problem.”


168. “You can change your habits and, in turn, change your life.”


169. You should be far more concerned with your current trajectory than with your current results. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


170. “With a big enough why you can overcome any how.- If your motivation and desire are great enough (that is, why you are acting), you’ll take action even when it is quite difficult. Greta craving can be power great action- even when friction is high.”


171. “The Cardinal Rule of Behavior Change: What is immediately rewarded is repeated. What is immediately punished is avoided. You learn what to do in the future based on what you were rewarded for doing (or punished for doing) in the past. Positive emotion cultivate habits. Negative emotions destroy them.”


172. “Becoming the best version of yourself requires you to continuously edit your beliefs, and to upgrade and expand your identity.”


173. “Rewards are the end goal of every habit. The cue is about noticing the reward. The craving is about wanting the reward. The response is about obtaining the reward. We chase rewards because they serve two purposes: (1) they satisfy us and (2) they teach us.”


174. “And if you’re really hard-core, move the television out of the living room and into a closet after each use. You can be sure you’ll only take it out when you really want to watch something. The greater the friction, the less likely the habit.”


175. “When you fall in love with the process rather than the product, you don’t have to wait to give yourself permission to be happy. You can be satisfied anytime your system is running.”


176. “No single instance will transform your beliefs, but as the votes build up, so does the evidence of your new identity.”


177. “We all want better lives for our future selves. However, when the moment of decision arrives, instant gratification usually wins. You are no longer making a choice for Future You, who dreams of being fitter or wealthier or happier. You are choosing for Present You, who wants to be full, pampered, and entertained. As a general rule, the more immediate pleasure you get from an action, the more strongly you should question whether it aligns with your long-term goals.*”


178. We don’t choose our earliest habits, we imitate them.»


179. “Change is the product of many small actions repeated day-in and day-out.”


180. “Here’s the powerful part: there are many different ways to address the same underlying motive. One person might learn to reduce stress by smoking a cigarette. Another person learns to ease their anxiety by going for a run. Your current habits are not necessarily the best way to solve the problems you face; they are just the methods you learned to use. Once you associate a solution with the problem you need to solve, you keep coming back to it.”


181. “Over the long run, however, the real reason you fail to stick with habits is that your self-image gets in the way. This is why you can’t get too attached to one version of your identity. Progress requires unlearning. Becoming the best version of yourself requires you to continuously edit your beliefs, and to upgrade and expand your identity.”


182. Extroversion: outgoing and energetic to solitary and reserved (you likely know them as extroverts vs. introverts).


183. “How can I make it obvious? How can I make it attractive? How can I make it easy? How can I make it satisfying?”


184. Environment design allows you to take back control and become the architect of your life. Be the designer of your world and not merely the consumer of it.»


185. “It is often because you have not yet crossed the Plateau of Latent Potential. Complaining about not achieving success despite working hard is like complaining about an ice cube not melting when you heated it from twenty-five to thirty-one degrees. Your work was not wasted; it is just being stored. All the action happens at thirty-two degrees.”


186. “Sustaining an effort is the most important thing for any enterprise. The way to be successful is to learn how to do things right, then do them the same way every time.”


187. “Los negocios son la búsqueda incesante por dar el mismo resultado de una manera más sencilla.”


188. “changes that seem small and unimportant at first will compound into remarkable results if you’re willing to stick”


189. “As a general rule, the more immediate pleasure you get from an action, the more strongly you should question whether it aligns with your long-term goals.*”


190. “Pain is an effective teacher.”


191. “Success is the product of daily habits—not once-in-a-lifetime transformations”


192. “Furthermore, goals create an “either-or” conflict: either you achieve your goal and are successful or you fail and you are a disappointment. You mentally box yourself into a narrow version of happiness. This is misguided.”


193. “goals create an “either-or” conflict: either you achieve your goal and are successful or you fail and you are a disappointment.”


194. “This is the feedback loop behind all human behavior: try, fail, learn, try differently”


195. “In the beginning, repeating a habit is essential to build up evidence of your desired identity. As you latch on to that new identity, however, those same beliefs can hold you back from the next level of growth. When working against you, your identity creates a kind of “pride” that encourages you to deny your weak spots and prevents you from truly growing. This is one of the greatest downsides of building habits.”


196. THE 2ND LAW: Make It Attractive


197. “You need to know who you want to be.”


198. “Instead of trying to engineer a perfect habit from the start, do the easy thing on a more consistent basis. You have to standardize before you can optimize.”


199. “Once you fall into the habit of seeing people as angry, unjust, or selfish, you see those kind of people everywhere.”


200. Breakthrough moments are often the result of many previous actions, which build up the potential required to unleash a major change.»


201. “As the psychologist Carl Jung said, “Until you make the unconscious conscious, it will direct your life and you will call it fate.”


202. “We imitate the habits of three groups in particular: The close. The many. The powerful.”


203. “Most people live in a world others have created for them, but you can alter the spaces where you live and work to increase your exposure to positive cues and reduce your exposure to negative ones.”


204. If we interpret these feelings positively, then we can respond with fluidity and grace. You can reframe “I am nervous” to “I am excited and I’m getting an adrenaline rush to help me concentrate.”»


205. The effect of one-off experiences tends to fade away while the effect of habits gets reinforced with time, which means your habits contribute most of the evidence that shapes your identity. In this way, the process of building habits is actually the process of becoming yourself.»


206. “Sometimes motion is useful, but it will never produce an outcome by itself. It doesn’t matter how many times you go talk to the personal trainer, that motion will never get you in shape. Only the action of working out will get the result you’re looking to achieve.”


207. “The first mistake is never the one that ruins you.7 It is the spiral of repeated mistakes that follows. Missing once is an accident.8 Missing twice is the start of a new habit.”


208. “Good habits can make rational sense, but if they conflict with your identity, you will fail to put them into action.”


209. “What’s the difference between systems and goals? It’s a distinction I first learned from Scott Adams, the cartoonist behind the Dilbert comic. Goals are about the results you want to achieve. Systems are about the processes that lead to those results.”


210. “I once heard a story about a man who uses a wheelchair. When asked if it was difficult being confined, he responded, “I’m not confined to my wheelchair—I am liberated by it. If it wasn’t for my wheelchair, I would be bed-bound and never able to leave my house.” This shift in perspective completely transformed how he lived each day. Reframing your habits to highlight their benefits rather than their drawbacks is a fast and lightweight way to reprogram your mind and make a habit seem more attractive.”


211. “Habits are the compound interest of self-improvement.”


212. Here’s how the math works out: if you can get 1 percent better each day for one year, you’ll end up thirty-seven times better by the time you’re done. Conversely, if you get 1 percent worse each day for one year, you’ll decline nearly down to zero.»


213. “Motivation is what gets you started. Habit is what keeps you going.”


214. “Instead of summoning a new dose of willpower whenever you want to do the right thing, your energy would be better spent optimizing your environment. This is the secret to self-control. Make the cues of your good habits obvious and the cues of your bad habits invisible.”


215. “Behavior that is incongruent with the self will not last. You may want more money, but if your identity is someone who consumes rather than creates, then you’ll continue to be pulled toward spending rather than earning. You may want better health, but if you continue to prioritize comfort over accomplishment, you’ll be drawn to relaxing rather than training. It’s hard to change your habits if you never change the underlying beliefs that led to your past behavior.”


216. You are walking around with the same hardware as your Paleolithic ancestors.»


217. “you just need to get your reps in.”


218. “Inversion of the 1st law (Cue): Make it invisible. Inversion of the 2nd law (Craving): Make it unattractive. Inversion of the 3rd law (Response): Make it difficult. Inversion of the 4th law (Reward): Make it unsatisfying.”


219. “When you can’t win by being better, you can win by being different.”


220. The truth is, a habit must be established before it can be improved.»


221. THE FUNDAMENTALS: Why Tiny Changes Make a Big Difference


222. “People who are better at delaying gratification have higher SAT scores, lower levels of substance abuse, lower likelihood of obesity, better responses to stress, and superior social skills.”


223. “Until you make the unconscious conscious, it will direct your life and you will call it fate.”


224. “To write a great book, you must first become the book.”


225. …atomic habits —a regular practice or routine that is not only small and easy to do, but also the source of incredible power; a component of the system of compound growth.»


226. “It’s a hallmark of any compounding process: the most powerful outcomes are delayed.”


227. “The cue triggers your brain to initiate a behavior.”


228. “How to Create a Good Habit The 1st law (Cue): Make it obvious. The 2nd law (Craving): Make it attractive. The 3rd law (Response): Make it easy. The 4th law (Reward): Make it satisfying.”


229. But when we repeat 1 percent errors, day after day, by replicating poor decisions, duplicating tiny mistakes, and rationalizing little excuses, our small choices compound into toxic results».


230. …one of the deepest human desires is to belong.»


231. “The implicit assumption behind any goal is this: “Once I reach my goal, then I’ll be happy. The problem with goals-first mentality is that you’re continually putting happiness off until the next milestone…..


232. Be the designer of your world and not merely the consumer of it. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


233. “In the long history of humankind, those who learned to collaborate and improvise most effectively hav prevailed.”


234. “Missing once is an accident. Missing twice is the start of a new habit. This is a distinguishing feature between winners and losers. Anyone can have a bad performance, a bad workout, or a bad day at work. But when successful people fail, they rebound quickly. The breaking of a habit doesn’t matter if the reclaiming of it is fast. I think this principle is so important that I’ll stick to it even if I can’t do a habit as well or as completely as I would like.


235. “Does this behavior help me become the type of person I wish to be?”


236. “Whenever you’re looking to improve, you can rotate through the Four Laws of Behavior Change until you find the next bottleneck. Make it obvious. Make it attractive. Make it easy. Make it satisfying. Round and round. Always looking for the next way to get 1 percent better.”


237. “Imagine that you have an ice cube sitting on the table in front of you. The room is cold and you can see your breath. It is currently twenty-five degrees. Ever so slowly, the room begins to heat up. Twenty-six degrees. Twenty-seven. Twenty-eight. The ice cube is still sitting on the table in front of you. Twenty-nine degrees. Thirty. Thirty-one. Still, nothing has happened. Then, thirty-two degrees. The ice begins to melt. A one-degree shift, seemingly no different from the temperature increases before it, has unlocked a huge change.”


238. “Usaha itu tidak sia-sia, hanya ditabung. Mungkin agak lama kemudian nilai sejati usaha-usaha terdahulu itu tersingkap.”


239. “The purpose of setting goals is to win the game. The purpose of building systems is to continue playing the game. True long-term thinking is goal-less thinking. It’s not about any single accomplishment. It is about the cycle of endless refinement and continuous improvement. Ultimately, it is your commitment to the process that will determine your progress.”


240. Some people spend their entire lives waiting for the time to be right to make an improvement. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


241. “The purpose of setting goals is to win the game, the purpose of building system is to continue playing the game.”


242. “I didn’t start out as a writer. I became one through my habits.”


243. “A very small shift in direction can lead to a very meaningful change in destination”


244. “perseverance, grit, and willpower are essential to success, but the way to improve these qualities is not by wishing you were a more disciplined person, but by creating a more disciplined environment.”


245. “This is a distinguishing feature between winners and losers. Anyone can have a bad performance, a bad workout, or a bad day at work. But when successful people fail, they rebound quickly. The breaking of a habit doesn’t matter if the reclaiming of it is fast.”


246. “Remove friction associated with good behaviors. When friction is low, habits are easy. Increase the friction associated with bad behaviors. When friction is high, bad habits are difficult.”


247. “In practice, it doesn’t really matter how long it takes for a habit to become automatic. What matters is that you take the actions you need to take to make progress.”


248. “get around to taking action. As Voltaire once wrote, “The best is the enemy of the good.”2”


249. “The habit stacking + temptation bundling formula is: After [CURRENT HABIT], I will [HABIT I NEED]. After [HABIT I NEED], I will [HABIT I WANT].”


250. “Habit formation is incredibly useful because the conscious mind is the bottleneck of the brain. It can only pay attention to one problem at a time. As a result, your brain is always working to preserve your conscious attention for whatever task is most essential. Whenever possible, the conscious mind likes to pawn off tasks to the non conscious mind to do automatically. This is precisely what happens when a habit is formed. Habits reduce cognitive load and free up mental capacity, so you can allocate your attention other tasks.”


251. The problem with a goals-first mentality is that you’re continually putting happiness off until the next milestone. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


252. ADVANCED TACTICS: How to Go from Being Merely Good to Being Truly Great


253. Becoming separated from the tribe—or worse, being cast out—was a death sentence. “The lone wolf dies, but the pack survives.”»


254. “The more you think of yourself as worthless, stupid, or ugly, the more you condition yourself to interpret life that way.”


255. “Chapter Summary The inversion of the 4th Law of Behavior Change is make it unsatisfying. We are less likely to repeat a bad habit if it is painful or unsatisfying. An accountability partner can create an immediate cost to inaction. We care deeply about what others think of us, and we do not want others to have a lesser opinion of us. A habit contract can be used to add a social cost to any behavior. It makes the costs of violating your promises public and painful. Knowing that someone else is watching you can be a powerful motivator.”


256. “When you can't win by being better, you can win by being different. By combining your skills, you reduce the level of competition, which makes it easier to stand out. You can shortcut the need for a genetic advantage (or for years of practice) by rewriting the rules. A good player works hard to win the game everyone else is playing. A great player creates a new game that favors their strengths and avoids their weaknesses.”


257. “Habits reduce cognitive load and free up mental capacity, so you can allocate your attention to other tasks.10”


258. “Getting 1 percent better every day counts for a lot in the long-run.”


259. “You can graduate with the finest degrees. You can read the most useful books. You can enjoy the loving support of family and friends.


260. “Being smart will never deliver results on its own because it doesn’t get you to act. It is desire, not intelligence, that prompts behavior.”


261. “An identity is the set of habits that you believe define you.”


262. “There is tremendous internal pressure to comply with the norms of the group. The reward of being accepted is often greater than the reward of winning an argument, looking smart, or finding truth. Most days, we’d rather be wrong with the crowd than be right by ourselves.”


263. “When all of your hard work is focused on a particular goal, what is left to push you forward after you achieve it?”


264. “But there is a trick. We are not looking for just any type of satisfaction. We are looking for immediate satisfaction.”


265. “The first mistake is never the one that ruins you. It is the spiral of repeated mistakes that follow. Missing once is an accident. Missing twice is the start of a new habit.”


266. “Placing a high value on salt, sugar, and fat is no longer advantageous to our health, but the craving persists because the brain’s reward centers have not changed for approximately fifty thousand years.”


267. “When nothing seems to help, I go and look at a stonecutter hammering away at his rock, perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundred and first blow it will split in two, and I know it was not that last blow that did it— but all that had gone before.”


268. “Habits are the building blocks of mastery.”


269. “Measurement offers one way to overcome blindness to our own behavior and notice what’s really going on each day. When the evidence is right in front of you, you’re less likely to lie to yourself.”


270. “the conscious mind is the bottleneck of the brain.”


271. “You are what you repeatedly do. Excellence, therefore, is not an act but a habit.”


272. “The truth is, a habit must be established before it can be improved. If you can’t learn the basic skill of showing up, then you have little hope of mastering the finer details. Instead of trying to engineer a perfect habit from the start, do the easy thing on a more consistent basis. You have to standardize before you can optimize.”


273. Habits are the entry point, not the end point.»


274. “Be forgiving with your past self.


275. “Mastery requires patience. The San Antonio Spurs, one of the most successful teams in NBA history, have a quote from social reformer Jacob Riis hanging in their locker room: “When nothing seems to help, I go and look at a stonecutter hammering away at his rock, perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundred and first blow it will split in two, and I know it was not that last blow that did it—but all that had gone before.”


276. “Professionals stick to the schedule;


277. “Thus whoever is stiff and inflexible is a disciple of death. Whoever is soft and yielding is a disciple of life. The hard and stiff will be broken. The soft and supple will prevail. —LAO TZU”


278. “when you have your habits dialed in and the basics of life are handled and done, your mind is free to focus on new challenges and master the next set of problems. Building habits in the present allows you to do more of what you want in the future.”


279. “It’s easier to avoid temptation than resist it.”


280. “whatever habits are normal in your culture are among the most attractive behaviors you’ll find.”


281. The only way I made progress—the only choice I had—was to start small.»


282. “In order to improve for good, you need to solve problems at the systems level. Fix the inputs and the outputs will fix themselves.”


283. “Good habits make time your ally. Bad habits make time your enemy.”


284. “The first mistake is never the one that ruins you. It is the spiral of repeated mistakes that follows. Missing once is an accident. Missing twice is the start of a new habit.”


285. “In short: genes do not determine your destiny. They determine your areas of opportunity”


286. “Habits are easier to build when they fit into the flow of your life. You are more likely to go to the gym if it is on your way to work because stopping doesn’t add much friction to your lifestyle.”


287. “If you can’t find a game where the odds are stacked in your favor, create one. Scott Adams, the cartoonist behind Dilbert, says, “Everyone has at least a few areas in which they could be in the top 25% with some effort.”


288. “Periodic reflection and review are like viewing yourself in the mirror from a conversational distance. You can see the important changes you should make without losing sight of the bigger picture. You want to view the entire mountain range, not obsess over each peak and valley.”


289. “The hard and stiff will be broken. The soft and supple will prevail. —LAO TZU”


290. If you’re still having trouble determining how to rate a particular habit, here is a question I like to use: “Does this behavior help me become the type of person I wish to be?»


291. “In fact, the tendency for one purchase to lead to another one has a name: the Diderot Effect. The Diderot Effect states that obtaining a new possession often creates a spiral of consumption”


292. “When you have repeated a story to yourself for years, it is easy to slide into these mental grooves and accept them as a fact. In time, you begin to resist certain actions because “that’s not who I am.” There is internal pressure to maintain your self-image and behave in a way that is consistent with your beliefs. You find whatever way you can to avoid contradicting yourself.”


293. “Happiness is not about the achievement of pleasure (which is joy or satisfaction), but about the lack of desire. It arrives when you have no urge to feel differently. Happiness is the state you enter when you no longer want to change your state.”


294. In the last one hundred years, we have seen the rise of the car, the airplane, the television, the personal computer, the internet, the smartphone, and Beyoncé.»


295. The culture we live in determines which behaviors are attractive to us.»


296. “Habits are a dopamine-driven feedback loop.”


297. “Sasaran bicara tentang hasil yang ingin kita raih. Sistem adalah proses yang mengantar ke hasil-hasil itu.”


298. “Boiling water will soften a potato but harden an egg. You can’t control whether you’re a potato or an egg, but you can decide to play a game where it’s better to be hard or soft.”


299. The Goldilocks Rule states that humans experience peak motivation when working on tasks that are right on the edge of their current abilities. Not too hard. Not too easy. Just right.»


300. “In the early 1990s, the cleaning staff at Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam installed a small sticker that looked like a fly near the center of each urinal. Apparently, when men stepped up to the urinals, they aimed for what they thought was a bug. The stickers improved their aim and significantly reduced “spillage” around the urinals. Further analysis determined that the stickers cut bathroom cleaning costs by 8 percent per year.”


301. THE 4TH LAW: Make It Satisfying


302. “Fix the inputs and the outputs will fix themselves.”


303. “The human body has about eleven million sensory receptors.7 Approximately ten million of those are dedicated to sight. Some experts estimate that half of the brain’s resources are used on vision.8 Given that we are more dependent on vision than on any other sense, it should come as no surprise that visual cues are the greatest catalyst of our behavior.”


304. This is a distinguishing feature between winners and losers. Anyone can have a bad performance, a bad workout, or a bad day at work. But when successful people fail, they rebound quickly. The breaking of a habit doesn’t matter if the reclaiming of it is fast.»


305. The most effective way I know to counteract this tendency is to use the Two-Minute Rule , which states, “When you start a new habit, it should take less than two minutes to do.”»


306. “We do not change by snapping our fingers and deciding to be someone entirely new. We change bit by bit, day by day, habit by habit. We are continually undergoing microevolutions of the self.”


307. “Stop thinking about your environment as filled with objects. Start thinking about it as filled with relationships. Think in terms of how you interact with the spaces around you. For one person, her couch is the place where she reads for an hour each night. For someone else, the couch is where he watches television and eats a bowl of ice cream after work. Different people can have different memories—and thus different habits—associated with the same place.”


308. People who are better at delaying gratification have higher SAT scores, lower levels of substance abuse, lower likelihood of obesity, better responses to stress, and superior social skills.»


309. “The first mistake is never the one that ruins you. It’s the spiral of repeated mistakes that follows.


310. “Our environment determines the suitability of our genes and the utility of our natural talents. When our environment changes, so do the qualities that determine success.”


311. “Habit stacking is a special form of an implementation intention. Rather than pairing your new habit with a particular time and location, you pair it with a current habit. This method, which was created by BJ Fogg as part of his Tiny Habits program, can be used to design an obvious cue for nearly any habit.*”


312. “The human brain is a prediction machine”


313. “People get so caught up in the fact that they have limits that they rarely exert the effort required to get close to them.”


314. Commitment devices increase the odds that you’ll do the right thing in the future by making bad habits difficult in the present.»


315. “Your current habits are not necessarily the best way to solve the problem you face, they are just the methods you learned to use. Once you associate a solution with the problem you need to solve, you keep coming back to it — an explanation for why habits are hard to break.”


316. “if you can get 1 percent better each day for one year, you’ll end up thirty-seven times better by the time you’re done.12 Conversely, if you get 1 percent worse each day for one year, you’ll decline nearly down to zero. What starts as a small win or a minor setback accumulates into something much more.”


317. “When you step outside your normal environment, you leave your behavioral biases behind. You aren’t battling old environment cues, which allows new habits to form without interruption.”


318. Mastery is the process of narrowing your focus to a tiny element of success, repeating it until you have internalized the skill, and then using this new habit as the foundation to advance to the next frontier of your development. Old tasks become easier the second time around, but it doesn’t get easier overall because now you’re pouring your energy into the next challenge. Each habit unlocks the next level of performance. It’s an endless cycle.»


319. “This a continuous process. There is no finish line. There is no permanent solution.”


320. “The work that hurts you less than it hurts others is the work you were made to do.”


321. “If you show up at the gym five days in a row—even if it’s just for two minutes—you are casting votes for your new identity. You’re not worried about getting in shape. You’re focused on becoming the type of person who doesn’t miss workouts. You’re taking the smallest action that confirms the type of person you want to be.”


322. “Every action you take is a vote for the type of person you wish to become. No single instance will transform your beliefs, but as the votes build up, so does the evidence of your new identity.”


323. “The process of building a habit can be divided into four simple steps: cue, craving, response, and reward.* Breaking it down into these fundamental parts can help us understand what a habit is, how it works, and how to improve it.”


324. We imitate the habits of three groups in particular: The close. The many. The powerful. — James Clear / Atomic Habits Quotes


325. “The road less traveled is the road of delayed gratification. If you’re willing to wait for the rewards, you’ll face less competition and often get a bigger payoff. As the saying goes, the last mile is always the least crowded.”


326. Anyone can work hard when they feel motivated. It’s the ability to keep going when work isn’t exciting that makes the difference.»


327. D. Salinger Quotes About Life (MEANINGFUL)


328. “The simple way to apply this strategy to your habits is to fill out this sentence: I will [BEHAVIOR] at [TIME] in [LOCATION].”


329. “Progress requires unlearning. Becoming best version of yourself requires you to continuously edit your beliefs, and to upgrade and expand your identity”


330. “Habits are attractive when we associate them with positive feelings, and we can use this insight to our advantage rather than to our detriment.”


331. This is one reason tidying up can feel so good: we are simultaneously moving forward and lightening the cognitive load our environment places on us.»


332. “The greatest threat to success is not failure but boredom. We get bored with habits because they stop delighting us. The outcome becomes expected. And as our habits become ordinary, we start derailing our progress to seek novelty.”


333. “La manera más práctica de cambiar quién eres, es cambiar lo que haces.”


334. “True long-term thinking is goal-less thinking. It’s not about any single accomplishment. It is about the cycle of endless refinement and continuous improvement.”


335. “When nothing seems to help, I go look at a stone cutter hammering away at his rock.


336. “A handful of problems arise when you spend too much time thinking about your goals and not enough time designing your systems.”


337. Making it obvious


338. “It almost always happens that when the immediate consequence is favorable, the later consequences are disastrous, and vice versa… often, the sweeter the first fruit of a habit, the more bitter are its later fruits.”


339. “In this way, the process of building habits is actually the process of becoming yourself.”


340. “While my peers stayed up late and played video games, I built good sleep habits and went to bed early each night.”


341. “La felicidad no consiste en alcanzar placer (lo cual es alegría o satisfacción), sino en una falta de deseo. La felicidad llega cuando no sientes la urgencia de sentirte de manera distinta. La felicidad es el estado en el que entras cuando ya no quieres cambiar de estado.”


342. “Your habits shape your identity, and your identity shapes your habits.”


343. As mathematician and philosopher Alfred North Whitehead wrote, “ Civilization advances by extending the number of operations we can perform without thinking about them.”»


344. “Every action you take is a vote for the type of person you wish to become. No single instance will transform your beliefs, but as the votes build up, so does the evidence of your new identity. This is one reason why meaningful change does not require radical change.”


345. “The amount of time you have been performing a habit is not as important as the number of times you have performed it.”


346. “habits make time your ally. Bad habits make time your enemy.”


347. Mastery requires patience.»


348. “Every action is a vote for the type of person you wish to become.”


349. “These are big questions, and many people aren’t sure where to begin—but they do know what kind of results they want: to get six-pack abs or to feel less anxious or to double their salary. That’s fine. Start there and work backward from the results you want to the type of person who could get those results. Ask yourself, “Who is the type of person that could get the outcome I want?”


350. “We change bit by bit, day by day, habit by habit. We are continually undergoing microevolutions of the self.”


351. Habits are the compound interest of self-improvement. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


352. “It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis. Too”


353. “Being specific about what you want and how you will achieve it helps you say no to things that derail progress, distract your attention, and pull you off course”


354. “The most powerful outcomes are delayed.”


355. “Research has shown that people who track their progress on goals like losing weight, quitting smoking, and lowering blood pressure are all more likely to improve than those who don’t.”


356. “The process of behavior change always starts with awareness. You need to be aware of your habits before you can change them.”


357. When you fall in love with the process rather than the product, you don’t have to wait to give yourself permission to be happy. You can be satisfied anytime your system is running. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


358. The human brain evolved to prioritize immediate rewards over delayed rewards.»


359. “The most practical way to change who you are is to change what you do.”


360. “I know of executives and investors who keep a “decision journal” in which they record the major decisions they make each week, why they made them, and what they expect the outcome to be. They review their choices at the end of each month or year to see where they were correct and where they went wrong.”


361. “Breakthrough moments are often the result of many previous actions, which build up the potential required to unleash a major change. This pattern shows up everywhere. Cancer spends 80 percent of its life undetectable, then takes over the body in months.18 Bamboo can barely be seen for the first five years as it builds extensive root systems underground before exploding ninety feet into the air within six weeks.”


362. “If we have hope, we have a reason to take action.”


363. “Military veterans and former entrepreneurs report similar feelings. If your identity is wrapped up in a belief like “I’m a great soldier,” what happens when your period of service ends? For many business owners, their identity is something along the lines of “I’m the CEO” or “I’m the founder.” If you have spent every waking moment working on your business, how will you feel after you sell the company?”


364. “Mastery requires patience.”


365. “Success is the product of daily habits—not once-in-a-lifetime transformations.”


366. “Goals are good for setting a direction, but systems are best for making progress. A handful of problems arise when you spend too much time thinking about your goals and not enough time designing your systems.”


367. “Time magnifies the margin between success and failure. It will multiply whatever you feed it. Good habits make time your ally. Bad habits make time your enemy.”


368. “Habits like “read more” or “eat better” are worthy causes, but these goals do not provide instruction on how and when to act.”


369. “All big things come from small beginnings.”


370. “There are three levels of change: outcome change, process change, and identity change. The most effective way to change your habits is to focus not on what you want to achieve, but on who you wish to become”


371. “What feels like fun to me, but work to others? The mark of whether you are made for a task is not whether you love it but whether you can handle the pain of the task easier than most people. When are you enjoying yourself while other people are complaining? The work that hurts you less than it hurts others is the work you were made to do.”


372. “Habits are like the atoms of our lives. Each one is a fundamental unit that contributes to your overall improvement.”


373. “Extroversion, for instance, can be tracked from birth. If scientists play a loud noise in the nursing ward, some babies turn toward it while others turn away. When the researchers tracked these children through life, they found that the babies who turned toward the noise were more likely to grow up to be extroverts. Those who turned away were more likely to become introverts.”


374. “Small habits can lead to remarkable results.”


375. “Relationships compound. People reflect your behavior back to you. The more you help others, the more others want to help you. Being a little bit nicer in each interaction can result in a network of broad and strong connections over time.”


376. “Your outcomes are a lagging measure of your habits.”


377. “Construir hábitos en el presente te permite hacer más en el futuro.”


378. “Your brain has far more neural circuitry allocated for wanting rewards than for liking them.”


379. “Habits are mental shortcuts learnt from experience.”


380. “The secret to maximizing your odds of success is to choose the right field of competition”


381. Life feels reactive, but it is actually predictive.»


382. “Ultimately, your habits matter because they help you become the type of person you wish to be. They are the channel through which you develop your deepest beliefs about yourself. The process of building habits is actually the process of becoming yourself.”


383. “Decisive moments set the options available to your future self. For instance, walking into a restaurant is a decisive moment because it determines what you’ll be eating for lunch.”


384. If you can make your good habits more convenient, you’ll be more likely to follow through on them.»


385. “The people with the best self-control are typically the ones who need to use it the least. It’s easier to practice self-restraint when you don’t have to use it very often. So, yes, perseverance, grit, and willpower are essential to success, but the way to improve these qualities is not by wishing you were a more disciplined person, but by creating a more disciplined environment.”


386. “When you make your bed each day, you embody the identity of an organized person. When you write each day, you embody the identity of a creative person. When you train each day, you embody the identity of an athletic person.”


387. The more you repeat an activity, the more the structure of your brain changes to become efficient at that activity. Neuroscientists call this long-term potentiation , which refers to the strengthening of connections between neurons in the brain based on recent patterns of activity. With each repetition, cell-to-cell signaling improves and the neural connections tighten.»


388. “The best way to predict your future is to create it.”


389. There have been a lot of sets that I haven’t felt like finishing, but I’ve never regretted doing the workout. There have been a lot of articles I haven’t felt like writing, but I’ve never regretted publishing on schedule. There have been a lot of days I’ve felt like relaxing, but I’ve never regretted showing up and working on something that was important to me.»


390. “Maquiavelo: «Los hombres desean novedad a tal grado que aquellos a quienes les va bien, desean un cambio tanto como aquellos a los que les está yendo mal.”


391. “What comes naturally to me? For just a moment, ignore what you have been taught. Ignore what society has told you. Ignore what others expect of you. Look inside yourself and ask, “What feels natural to me? When have I felt alive? When have I felt like the real me?” No internal judgments or people-pleasing. No second-guessing or self-criticism. Just feelings of engagement and enjoyment. Whenever you feel authentic and genuine, you are headed in the right direction.”


392. “Does this behavior help me become the type of person I wish to be? Does this habit cast a vote for or against my desired identity?” Habits that reinforce your desired identity are usually good. Habits that conflict with your desired identity are usually bad.”


393. The more pride you have in a particular aspect of your identity, the more motivated you will be to maintain the habits associated with it. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


394. “Suddenly, you are not only failing to uphold your promise to yourself, but you are failing to uphold your promise to others.”


395. These are the supernormal stimuli of our modern world. They exaggerate features that are naturally attractive to us, and our instincts go wild as a result, driving us into excessive shopping habits, social media habits, porn habits, eating habits, and many others.»


396. “Most people live in a world others have created for them. But you can alter the spaces where you live and work to increase your exposure to positive cues and reduce your exposure to negative ones. Environment design allows you to take back control and become the architect of your life. Be the designer of your world and not merely the consumer of it.”


397. “Be the designer of your world and not merely the consumer of it.”


398. “Never underestimate the power of a single habit in shaping your life.”


399. “Habits are the atoms of our lives. They are small and may seem inconsequential, but over time, they shape our identity.”


400. “We all face challenges in life. This injury was one of mine, and the experience taught me a critical lesson: changes that seem small and unimportant at first will compound into remarkable results if you’re willing to stick with them for years. We all deal with setbacks but in the long run, the quality of our lives often depends on the quality of our habits. With the same habits, you’ll end up with the same results. But with better habits, anything is possible.”


401. “Your outcomes are a lagging measure of your habits. Your net worth is a lagging measure of your financial habits. Your weight is a lagging measure of your eating habits. Your knowledge is a lagging measure of your learning habits. Your clutter is a lagging measure of your cleaning habits. You get what you repeat.”


402. “Done” App Review: My Favorite Habit Tracker


403. “Unfortunately, the slow pace of transformation also makes it easy to let a bad habit slide.”


404. “Whenever possible, avoid mixing the context of one habit and another. When you start mixing contexts, you’ll start mixing habits – and the easier ones will usually win out.”


405. “The most proven scientific analysis of personality traits is known as the "Big Five", which breaks them down into five spectrums of behavior.


406. “Whenever you face a problem repeatedly, your brain begins to automate the process of solving it. Your habits are just a series of automatic solutions that solve the problems and stresses you face regularly. As behavioral scientist Jason Hreha writes, “Habits are, simply, reliable solutions to recurring problems in our environment.” As habits are created, the level of activity in the brain decreases. You learn to lock in on the cues that predict success and tune out everything else. When”


407. “Your outcomes are a lagging measure of your habits. Your net worth is a lagging measure of your financial habits. Your weight is a lagging measure of your eating habits. Your knowledge is a lagging measure of your learning habits.”


408. Openness to experience: From curious and inventive on one end to cautious and consistent on the other.


409. “When scientists analyze people who appear to have tremendous self-control, it turns out those individuals aren’t all that different from those who are struggling. Instead, “disciplined” people are better at structuring their lives in a way that does not require heroic willpower and self-control. In other words, they spend less time in tempting situations.”


410. “Business is a never-ending quest to deliver the same result in an easier fashion.”


411. “Environment design allows you to take back control and become the architect of your life. Be the designer of your world and not merely the consumer of it.”


412. “Decide the type of person you want to be.”


413. If you want better results, then forget about setting goals. Focus on your system instead.»


414. “Your habits shape your identity, and your identity shapes your habits. It’s a two-way street. The formation of all habits is a feedback loop”


415. “Compared to nature, these pleasure-packed experiences are hard to resist. We have the brains of our ancestors but temptations they never had to face.”


416. “Once we fit in, we start looking for ways to stand out.”


417. “The implicit assumption behind any goal is this: “Once I reach my goal, then I’ll be happy.” The problem with a goals-first mentality is that you’re continually putting happiness off until the next milestone. I’ve slipped into this trap so many times I’ve lost count. For years, happiness was always something for my future self to enjoy. I promised myself that once I gained twenty pounds of muscle or after my business was featured in the New York Times, then I could finally relax.”


418. “Complaining about not achieving success despite working hard is like complaining about an ice cube not melting when you heated it from twenty-five to thirty-one degrees. Your work was not wasted; it is just being stored. All the action happens at thirty-two degrees.”


419. “Happiness is simply the absence of desire. When you observe a cue, but do not desire to change your state, you are content with the current situation. Happiness is not about the achievement of pleasure (which is joy or satisfaction), but about the lack of desire. It arrives when you have no urge to feel differently.”


420. “Peace occurs when you don’t turn your observations into problems. The first step in any behavior is observation. You notice a cue, a it of information, an event. If you do not desire to act on what you observe , then you are at peace.


421. “Doing the right thing is easy. After all, when your behavior and your identity are fully aligned, you are no longer pursuing behavior change. You are simply acting like the type of person you already believe yourself to be.”


422. “Outrage compounds. Riots, protests, and mass movements are rarely the result of a single event. Instead, a long series of microaggressions and daily aggravations slowly multiply until one event tips the scales and outrage spreads like wildfire.”


423. “The upside of habits is that we can do things without thinking. The downside of habits is that you get used to doing things a certain way and stop paying attention to little errors. You assume you’re getting better because you’re gaining experience. In reality, you are merely reinforcing your current habits—not improving them. In fact, some research has shown that once a skill has been mastered there is usually a slight decline in performance over time.”


424. “It is easier to associate a new habit with a new context than to build a new habit in the face of competing cues.”


425. “Problem #1: Winners and losers have the same goals.”


426. “Habits do not restrict freedom. They create it. In fact, the people who don’t have their habits handled are often the ones with the least amount of freedom.”


427. “Estamos tan enfocados en descubrir la mejor manera de hacer algo que en realidad nunca ponemos manos a la obra. Como dijo alguna vez Voltaire: «Lo mejor es enemigo de lo bueno».2”


428. “Change can take years—before it happens all at once.”


429. Ultimately, it is your commitment to the process that will determine your progress. — James Clear / Atomic Habits Quotes


430. “It is a lot easier for people to adopt a product that provides a strong positive sensory signal, for example the mint taste of toothpaste, than it is to adopt a habit that does not provide pleasurable sensory feedback, like flossing one’s teeth.


431. “The whole principle came from the idea that if you broke down everything you could think of that goes into riding a bike, and then improve it by one percent, you will get a significant increase when you put them all together.”


432. “Habits are the compound interest of self-improvement. The same way that money multiplies through compound interest, the effects of your habits multiply as you repeat them. They seem to make little difference on any given day and yet the impact they deliver over the months and years can be enormous. It is only when looking back two, five, or perhaps ten years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”


433. “but it’s important to let your values, principles, and identity drive the loop rather than your results. The focus should always be on becoming that type of person, not getting a particular outcome.”


434. “It is easy to get bogged down trying to find the optimal plan for change: the fastest way to lose weight, the best program to build muscle, the perfect idea for a side hustle. We are so focused on figuring out the best approach that we never get around to taking action. As Voltaire once wrote, “The best is the enemy of the good.”


435. “you can imagine how important it is to live and work in environments that are filled with productive cues and devoid of unproductive ones.”


436. A slight change in your daily habits can guide your life to a different destination. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


437. “The backbone of this book is my four-step model of habits—cue, craving, response, and reward—and the four laws of behavior change that evolve out of these steps.”


438. “Habits deliver numerous benefits, but the downside is that they can lock us into our previous patterns of thinking and acting – even when the world around us is shifting.


439. “A habit is a routine or behavior that is performed regularly—and, in many cases, automatically.”


440. Making it easy


441. Behind every system of actions, are a system of beliefs. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


442. “If you’re having trouble changing your habits, the problem isn’t you. The problem is your system.”


443. “You do not rise to the level of your goals. You fall to the level of your systems.”


444. “No behavior happens in isolation.”


445. “Motivation is overrated, environment often matters more.”


446. “When a measure becomes a target, it ceases to be a good measure.”


447. “Happiness is simply the absence of desire.- When you observe a cue, but do not desire to change your state, you are content with the current situation. Happiness is not about the achievement of pleasure, but about the lack of desire. It arrives when you have no urge to feel differently. Happiness is the state you enter when you no longer want to change your state.


448. “Habit formation is the process by which a behavior becomes progressively more automatic through repetition.”


449. Decide the type of person you want to be. Prove it to yourself with small wins. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


450. “Tak penting seberapa sukses atau seberapa gagal Anda saat ini. Yang penting adalah apakah kebiasaan-kebiasaan Anda menempatkan Anda pada jalur menuju kesuksesan atau tidak. Anda harus jauh lebih peduli pada arah tujuan Anda saat ini daripada hasil-hasil saat ini.”


451. “You should be far more concerned with your current trajectory than with your current results.”


452. “Your current habits are not necessarily the best way to solve the problems you face; they are just the methods you learned to use.”


453. “Showing pictures of blackened lungs to smokers leads to higher levels of anxiety, which drives many people to reach for a cigarette.”


454. “Until you work as hard as those you admire, don't explain away their success as luck.”


455. You don’t have to build the habits everyone tells you to build. Choose the habit that best suits you, not the one that is most popular. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


456. “It is the anticipation of a reward—not the fulfillment of it—that gets us to take action.”


457. “This is why you can’t get too attached to one version of your identity. Progress requires unlearning. Becoming the best version of yourself requires you to continuously edit your beliefs, and to upgrade and expand your identity.”


458. However, the benefits of habits come at a cost. At first, each repetition develops fluency, speed, and skill. But then, as a habit becomes automatic, you become less sensitive to feedback. You fall into mindless repetition. It becomes easier to let mistakes slide. When you can do it “good enough” on autopilot, you stop thinking about how to do it better.»


459. But just because you can measure something doesn’t mean it’s the most important thing. And just because you cannot measure something doesn’t mean it’s not important at all. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


460. “the long history of humankind, those who learned to collaborate and improvise most effectively have prevailed.”


461. Getting 1 percent better every day counts for a lot in the long-run. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


462. “the aggregation of marginal gains,” which was the philosophy of searching for a tiny margin of improvement in everything you do.”


463. “The more you let a single belief define you, the less capable you are of adapting when life challenges you.”


464. “There is tremendous internal pressure to comply with the norms of the group. The reward of being accepted is often greater than the reward of winning an argument, looking smart, or finding truth.”


465. Behavior is a function of the Person in their Environment, or B = f (P,E).»


466. “Every action you take is a vote for the type of person you wish to become. No single instance will transform your beliefs, but as the votes build up, so does the evidence of your new identity. This is one reason why meaningful change does not require radical change. Small habits can make a meaningful difference by providing evidence of a new identity. And if a change is meaningful, it actually is big. That’s the paradox of making small improvements.”


467. Making it attractive


468. “The problem with a goals-first mentality is that you’re continually putting happiness off until the next milestone.”


469. “Habits matter because they help you become the person you wish to be.”


470. “Y tuve la certeza de que si las cosas iban a mejorar, yo sería el único responsable de lograrlo.”


471. “The greatest threat to success is not failure but boredom. We get bored with habits because they stop delighting us. The outcome becomes expected. And as our habits become ordinary, we start detailing our progress to seek novelty.”


472. “The Goldilocks Rule states that humans experience peak motivation when working on tasks that are right on the edge of their current abilities. Not too hard. Not too easy. Just right.”


473. “As Caed Budris says, “Happiness is the space between one desire being fulfilled and a new desire forming.” Likewise, suffering is the space between craving a change in state and getting it.”


474. “In short: genes do not determine your destiny. They determine your areas of opportunity.”


475. “You’re exploring, exploring, exploring and then BAM! You get a reward.”


476. We are so focused on figuring out the best approach that we never get around to taking action. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


477. “Don't break the chain" makes a lot of sense for me. To keep in mind in every single initiative the we get involved. Thanks for sharing Ahmed


478. “Research has shown that once a person believes in a particular aspect of their identity, they are more likely to act in alignment with that belief.”


479. “But perhaps the best way to measure your progress is with a habit tracker.”


480. “Self-control is only a short term strategy. You may be able to resist temptation once or twice, but it’s unlikely you can muster the willpower to override your desires every time. This practice is exhausting and your energy would be better spent optimizing your environment and removing cues for bad behavior.”


481. “We don’t choose our earliest habits, we imitate them.”


482. “If I outline twenty ideas for articles I want to write, that’s motion. If I actually sit down and write an article, that’s action.”


483. “Breakthrough moments are often the result of many previous actions, which build up the potential required to unleash a major change. This pattern shows up everywhere.”


484. “Over the long run, however, the real reason you fail to stick with habits is that your self-image gets in the way. This is why you can't get too attached to one version of your identity. Progress requires unlearning. Becoming the best version of yourself requires you to continuously edit your beliefs, and to upgrade and expand your identity.”


485. “In the beginning, repeating a habit is essential to build up evidence of your desired identity. As you latch on to that new identity, however, those same beliefs can hold you back from the next level of growth. When working against you, your identity creates a kind of "pride" that encourages you to deny your weak spots and prevents you from truly growing. This is one of the greatest downsides of building habits...


486. “Habits are mental shortcuts learned from experience.”


487. “It’s one thing to say I’m the type of person who wants this. It’s a very different thing to say I’m the type of person who is this.”


488. “We all deal with setbacks but in the long run, the quality of our lives often depends on the quality of our habits. With the same habits, you’ll end up with the same results. But with better habits, anything is possible.”


489. Success is the product of daily habits—not once-in-a-lifetime transformations.»


490. “Once you have adopted an identity, it can be easy to let your allegiance to it impact your ability to change.”


491. “Given that we are more dependent on vision than on any other sense, it should come as no surprise that visual cues are the greatest catalyst of our behavior. For this reason, a small change in what you see can lead to a big shift in”


492. “The more pride you have in a particular aspect of your identity, the more motivated you will be to maintain the habits associated with it.”


493. “I made a point to keep my room neat and tidy.”


494. “There are three layers of behavior change: a change in your outcomes, a change in your processes, or a change in your identity.”


495. “If you find yourself struggling to build a good habit or break a bad one, it is not because you have lost your ability to improve. It is often because you have not yet crossed the Plateau of Latent Potential. Complaining about not achieving success despite working hard is like complaining about an ice cube not melting when you heated it from twenty-five to thirty-one degrees. Your work was not wasted; it is just being stored. All the action happens at thirty-two degrees.”


496. “Finances. When I want to buy something over $100, I will wait twenty-four hours before purchasing.”


497. “We often seem to dismiss small changes because they don’t seem to matter very much in the moment.”


498. “I know now, after fifty years, that the finding/losing, forgetting/remembering, leaving/returning, never stops. The whole of life is about another chance, and while we are alive, till the very end, there is always another chance.”


499. “One of the most common questions I hear is, “How long does it take to build a new habit?” But what people really should be asking is, “How many does it take to form a new habit?” That is, how many repetitions are required to make a habit automatic?”


500. “Complaining about not achieving success despite working hard is like complaining about an ice cube not melting when you heated it from 25 to 31 degrees. All the action happens at 32 degrees.”


501. With the same habits, you’ll end up with the same results. But with better habits, anything is possible. — James Clear / Atomic Habits


502. Ask yourself, “Who is the type of person that could get the outcome I want?”»


503. “Finance. Saving money is often associated with sacrifice. However, you can associate it with freedom rather than limitation if you realize one simple truth: living below your current means increases your future means. The money you save this month increases your purchasing power next month.”


504. But this coach was saying that really successful people feel the same lack of motivation as everyone else. The difference is that they still find a way to show up despite the feelings of boredom.»


505. “All big things come from small beginnings. The seed of every habit is a single, tiny decision.”


506. Your habits shape your identity, and your identity shapes your habits. — James Clear / Atomic Habits